Courses

FIN 5501 Economics For Administration Credits: 3

This course is designed for graduate students in the School of Business and Public Administration. Topics include the theory and determination of national income, fiscal policy, monetary theory and policy, production and cost theory, and market structure.

FIN 5502 Corporate Financial Management I Credit: 1.5

This course provides a rigorous distillation of time value of money analysis techniques, methods which form the basic quantitative approach used in corporation finance. The three main topic areas covered during the course are the principles of time value of money analysis itself, its application to the valuation of corporate bond and equity securities, and the quantitative decision making rules utilized in corporate capital budgeting analysis.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5501.

FIN 5504 Managerial Economics Credit: 1.5

This course applies microeconomic principles to for-profit and not-for-profit enterprises. Topics include: supply, demand, elasticity, equilibrium, cost and production theory, factor pricing, market structure and pricing and public policy toward business.

FIN 5505 Global Macroeconomics Credit: 1.5

Global Macroeconomics examines fiscal and monetary policies in the US as well as other countries. It considers issues of international trade, exchange rates and coordination of economic policies as well as economic integration and fiscal and financial crisis management.

FIN 5507 Corporate Financial Management II Credit: 1.5

This course provides a continuation of the study of corporate financial management principles introduced in FIN 5502. Specific topics covered in this course include the study of detailed corporate capital budgeting problems, the fundamental risk versus return paradigm encountered in financial markets, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, and the cost of investment capital for a business enterprise.

FIN 5515 Managerial Economics Credits: 2

This course studies the relationships between the economic theory and system as a whole and the ways in which their functioning is affected by the behavior of the interdependent sectors of which they are composed. Students will explore the major factors and determinants of economic prospects relevant to profit-maximizing production and pricing decisions for the firm.

Prerequisites: admission to executive MBA program.

FIN 5532 Financial Management Credits: 3

An introduction to the role of financial management through the development of a conceptual framework appropriate for financial decision making. Generally, financial management is charged with the responsibility for obtaining and effectively utilizing the funds necessary for the operation of an enterprise. As such, the conceptual framework includes elements of financial planning (financial analysis, cash budgeting and profit planning), capital budgeting (rate of return and cost of capital), and basic considerations of alternative sources of funds.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5517, DSOM 5508, and FIN 5501 (or equivalents).

FIN 5534 Thinking Critically: The Role of Incentives and Human Behavior Credits: 2

An overview of the economics of rational decision-making drawing on recent developments in behavioral economics and theory. Students learn how human beings make decisions in the presence of uncertainty, limited information and the crucial role of human resourcefulness, incentives, and trade-offs in predicting the ultimate effects of decision-making outcomes.

FIN 5535 Contemporary Techniques of Financial Analysis Credits: 2

Students learn to effectively analyze crucial financial decisions involving asset allocation and valuation. Time value of money, capital budgeting techniques, cash flow estimation, risk and return, and the calculation of a company's cost-of-capital are taught through hands-on analysis of real-world problems.

FIN 5536 The New Corporate Finance: Where Theory Meets Practice Credits: 2

Focusing on critical developments in finance theory and practice from an upper-level or “boardroom” perspective. Emphasis is on the critical financial decisions made at the highest levels of an enterprise such as agency conflicts, signaling theory, derivatives, and capital structure and dividend decisions.

FIN 5537 Enterprise Risk Management Credits: 2

Students conduct a comprehensive assessment of the physical, reputation, emotional, financial, and facilities risks associated with an organization and its events. They must also assess each risk based on its probability of occurrence and severity of consequences and make decisions about accepting, modifying, transferring, and/or eliminating risks based on those assessments.

FIN 5550 Advanced Financial Management Theory And Policies Credits: 3

Advanced financial management covering topics such as working capital, financial structure, cost of capital, dividend policy and valuation. Discussions include both financial theory as well as financial policy. Includes exposure to literature central to the development of finance theory.

Prerequisites: Six hours of finance coursework beyond FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5551 International Financial Management Credits: 3

This course analyzes present and future international financial market conditions and extends the decision-making tasks of financial management into the context of problems of the international and foreign financial systems. The financial constraints of the international business environment and their effect on standard concepts of financial management are studied along with international currency flows, capital structure problems, working capital management, foreign investment, and international banking practices.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5552 Global Financial Markets and Institutions Credits: 3

Students are introduced to global financial markets and institutions. Topics include equity, debt, commodity, housing, and foreign exchange markets both in the U.S. and globally. The course explores the effects of monetary and fiscal policy, with emphasis on past and current global financial crises, financial restructuring and reforms, as well as the interrelationships between financial and real economies.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5553 Investment Analysis Credits: 3

Development of a theoretical framework applicable to the solution of problems related to creation and management of the investment portfolio. Consideration is given to the analysis of risk, functions of security markets, sources of information, evaluation of securities, and measurement of investment return.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5556 Management Of Financial Intermediaries Credits: 3

This course addresses the management operations of selected financial intermediaries including commercial banks and thrift institutions. Attention is given to asset-liability structure, the development and delivery of financial services, institutional structure, legal and regulatory factors, and the dynamics of the competitive environment.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5557 Derivative Securities Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of financial risk management. The student should develop a working knowledge of issues regarding both the theoretical valuation and application of derivative securities. Applications will focus on techniques designed to manage financial risks in the corporate environment. Specifically, the course will focus on using futures, options, and swaps to hedge financial risks. Valuation issues will be explored to identify theoretical pricing fundamentals that can be applied toward valuing newly developed securities.

Prerequisites: FIN 5501, FIN 5532, DSOM 5508, and ACCTNG 5517, or equivalents.

FIN 5559 Strategic Financial Management Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of financial risk management. The student should develop a working knowledge of issues regarding both the theoretical valuation and application of derivative securities. Applications will focus on techniques designed to manage financial risks in the corporate environment. Specifically, the course will focus on using futures, options, and swaps to hedge financial risks. Valuation issues will be explored to identify theoretical pricing fundamentals that can be applied toward valuing newly developed securities.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5517, DSOM 5508, FIN 5501, and FIN 5532 (or equivalents).

FIN 5560 Financial Modeling Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to some of the fundamental quantitative methods used in investment analysis. The student should develop a working knowledge of measuring risk and return, probability theory, sampling and estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, regression and time series analysis, The course will emphasize experimental learning by applying these concepts to real data in a spreadsheet environment.

Prerequisites: Completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics and finance.

FIN 5561 Financial Statement Analysis Credits: 3

Students will take an in-depth look at the external financial statements that are prepared by corporations, including the tools needed to organize, summarize, and understand corporate financial data for use in decision making. Ratio analysis, trend analysis, earnings forecasting, bankruptcy predictors statistical methods important to finance, and financial data bases are among the topics that will be covered.

Prerequisites: Completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics, and finance.

FIN 5562 Fixed Income Analysis Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to provide an overall view of the role of debt markets in the modern economy. The course will cover the characteristics of instruments traded in money and capital markets; determinants of and the relationships between different security prices; and international aspects of financial markets. Topics include: valuing fixed income securities, managing interest rate risk, interest rate theory, the organization of bond markets and the structure and pricing theory underlying the mortgage-related fixed income market.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Bloch School, FIN 5502 (or equivalent).

FIN 5563 Valuation/Mergers and Acquisitions Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to techniques used to value both exchange-traded and private firms. Students should apply these techniques to cases involving mergers and acquisitions, initial public offerings private firm valuation and the valuation of a publicly traded stock.

Prerequisites: completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics and finance.

FIN 5564 Portfolio Management Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to some of the fundamental portfolio management tools used by practicing investment professionals. The student should develop a working knowledge of issues regarding portfolio construction, asset allocation, mean-variance optimization, performance measurement, and client relationship management.

Prerequisites: completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics and finance.

FIN 5565 Alternative Investments Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to investing in alternative assets. The student should develop a working knowledge of various types of alternative investments and how they impact the risk-return profile of a portfolio. The course will cover investments in hedge funds, private equity, real estate, commodities, real assets, energy, and infrastructure.

Prerequisites: completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics and finance.

FIN 5566 Financial Plan Development Credits: 3

Personal financial planning differs for each of us for a variety of reasons including age, family, wealth, needs, income, and personalities to name a few. Nonetheless the tax, financial, and risk environments which inspire us to set goals are similar for all of us. Financial planners must take all of these financial and nonfinancial factors into consideration as they devise a plan for their clients. Our objectives, therefore, are to study the personal financial planning process and environment, examine the questions of financial planning, learn financial planning techniques, and develop the ability to prepare integrated financial plans for our clients.

FIN 5567 Payment Systems Credits: 3

Payment systems are central to modern economies, underpinning nearly all economic exchange among consumers, businesses, and government entities. Payment systems in the U.S. have undergone fundamental changes recently. yet, these systems are among the least studied and least understood components of our economy. The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth knowledge of U.S. payment systems and an analytical framework for evaluating and responding to ongoing changes in the payments landscape..

FIN 5568 Organizational Finance Credits: 2

Gives students a thorough introduction to financial management that blends appropriate amounts of relevant theory with practical application.Topics include discounting techniques and applications, evaluating capital expenditures, estimating cost of capital, and valuing stocks and bonds.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Executive MBA program.

FIN 5570 Introduction to Personal Financial Planning Credits: 3

Personal financial planning differs for each of us for a variety of reasons including age, family, wealth, needs, income, and personalities to name a few. Nonetheless the tax, financial, and risk environments which inspire us to set goals are similar for all of us. Financial planners must take all of these financial and nonfinancial factors into consideration as they devise a plan for their clients. Our objectives, therefore, are to study the personal financial planning process and environment, examine the questions of financial planning, learn financial planning techniques, and develop the ability to prepare integrated financial plans for our clients.

FIN 5571 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits Credits: 3

A study of retirement and employee benefits planning, with consideration of Social Security and Medicare planning.

Prerequisites: FIN 5570 or equivalent.

FIN 5572 Income Tax Planning Credits: 3

A study of taxation, with an emphasis on federal, state, and local income taxation, as part of the financial planning process.

FIN 5573 Estate Planning Credits: 3

This course applies the principles of estate planning to real-world situations using the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations and develops strategic decision making skills in the estate, gift, and trust areas.

FIN 5574 Student Investment Fund I Credit: 1.5

In the first semester, students will help actively manage our student investment fund portfolio and will be responsible for analyzing the investment policy statement, generating performance reports and identifying assets to recommend for the portfolio. During this time students will act as industry analysts for specific portions of the portfolio.

Prerequisites: FIN 5553

FIN 5575 Student Investment Fund II Credit: 1.5

In the second semester, students will take a leadership role in managing our student investment fund portfolio and will be responsible for updating the investment policy statement, presenting performance reports and evaluating asset recommendations for the portfolio. In addition, students will actively participate in researching potential new investments.

Prerequisites: FIN 5574

FIN 5580 Organizational Valuation & Financial Modeling I Credits: 2

This course will cover the concept of risk and reward and that to eliminate risk is to eliminate reward. We will delve into how management considers the entity's risk appetite in evaluating strategic alternatives, setting related objectives and developing mechanisms to manage related risks.

Prerequisites: Admission to Executive MBA program.

FIN 5582 Seminar In Finance Credits: 3

Advanced work in financial management, investment analysis, and financial markets and institutions will form the basis for the Seminar. Each topic selected will provide the opportunity for an investigative study on the part of the student. Major problems, hypotheses, and cases, together with the literature addressing the specific topic, will serve as the springboard for classroom activity. Both written and oral reports are required.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5587 Special Topics Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possible only offering of new topics.

FIN 5595 Internship Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community.

FIN 5597 Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

FIN 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1