Dean's Office, Scofield Hall
711 E. 51st Street
(816) 235-1136
Fax: (816) 235-5191
college@umkc.edu
http://cas.umkc.edu/

Dean:
Wayne Vaught

Associate Deans:
John Herron

Jennifer Lundgren

Kati Toivanen

Statement of Purpose

The primary academic missions of the College of Arts and Sciences are teaching, research and service. Through these functions, the College serves the community, the state and society at large. The research and scholarship of the College's faculty not only expand the body of knowledge generally, but also enrich and enhance its teaching and instructional programs.

Most departments of the College offer both undergraduate and graduate study. The College enables students to develop the creative, analytical and communication skills which sustain a lifelong educational process. In addition to serving its own students, the College provides instruction in the liberal arts and sciences for students in the UMKC professional schools. Through its continuing education division and certificate programs, the College also serves individuals and groups in the community.

The College's degree requirements, in coordination with the UMKC general education core, give students a breadth of knowledge, enabling them to understand and appreciate the many facets of human experience, to make meaningful relationships between the various fields of knowledge, and to increase their understanding of themselves, their interests and special abilities. The general requirements and introductory courses allow for maximum freedom in selection of a field of study and provide the basic knowledge for that particular program.

Work in a field of study provides students with a comprehensive and systematic introduction that prepares them to function in the professional fields of their choice. The objective of the total academic program of the College is to engage students in study that will enable them to work competently in their chosen fields or pursue graduate work, while at the same time developing a breadth of knowledge in the arts and sciences. In that way, students can understand their specializations in the larger context of the intellectual and social life of the community.

Graduate-level studies provide students with advanced instruction and/or independent research in a major field of study. Students pursuing master's-level work in a major field or a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology are directed to the relevant department or program listing in the Arts and Sciences section of this catalog and to the General Graduate Academic Regulations and Information section of this catalog. Those planning other Ph.D.-level studies are directed to UMKC's Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program listing in the School of Graduate Studies section of this catalog.

Arts & Sciences Courses

A&S 100 Methodologies In Liberal Arts & Sciences: Theories & Application Credits: 3

This three hour course is designed for freshmen and transfer students, to be taken during their first semester of study at UMKC. The curriculum provides students an introduction to the major disciplines and methodologies of the liberal arts and sciences (the humanities, social sciences, and sciences), including sessions on choosing majors and careers. Additional emphases will include learning to use the library, writing and computational skills, oral presentations, cultural diversity, stress management, and study strategies.

A&S 115 Career Possibilities Credit: 1

This course introduces career development as a complex process of self-assessment and decision-making. Students analyze their personal interests & motivation, conduct self-assessment, identify their personal values, and discuss ethical considerations as they relate to possible career choices. Visiting professionals will provide insight into career options as students explore possible career paths.

A&S 210 Cross-Cultural Interaction: Experience and Understanding Credits: 3

This course focuses on the social and cultural context of interactional patterns. U.S. and international students are paired in academic activities to encourage mutual understanding and self-awareness. They will draw on a variety of resources and learning modalities to examine aspects of their own and one another's societies, cultures, religions, and family relations. Making use of intercultural theories, students will reflect upon and explore cultural myths and stereotypes and develop a general understanding of cultural similarities and differences.

A&S 215 Career Explorations Credit: 1

The primary focus of this course is to complete an in-depth self-assessment and the generation of personalized list of career paths. Personal values will inform these possibilities, which are then explored through job shadowing, informational interviews, visiting lecturers, and independent career research. Ethical considerations of chosen career paths are explored. Students reflect on the professional experiences of others and relate them to their own personal values.

Prerequisites: A&S 115.

A&S 310 Cross-Cultural Interaction II: Social Relations Credits: 3

This course will match international students with U.S. students to prepare them to interact more effectively in multilingual and/or intercultural settings. Students learn through readings on cultural theory and cultural relations, in-class small group activities, discussions and lectures, how issues of identity, such as age, sexual orientation, and ethnicity; impact cross-cultural interaction. Papers written for this course will help students integrate theory with previous experience, leading to an understanding of oppression in cross-cultural interaction.

Prerequisites: A&S 210.

A&S 315 Career Methods Credit: 1

In this course students begin to map out the realization of their career paths. They analyze their career choices, how these choices inform their life plans, articulate the ethical and moral requirements of these careers, and understand how their personal values and strengths match these requirements. Independent career research and entry preparation along with job shadowing, informational interviews, mock interviews, and other preparations required for the selected career choices are included in this class.

Prerequisites: A&S 215.

A&S 341 Union Leadership and Administration Credits: 3

This course focuses on the roles and challenges of union leadership in a changing environment. Topics include the union leaders' role as a representative, organizer and educator as well as administrative responsibilities within the union and the relationship with enterprise management in both adversarial and participatory situations. Options for leadership styles and organizational models will be discussed and explored in both theory and practice. Leaders will develop their skills of motivation, speaking, strategic planning and managing complex campaigns and diverse organizations. This course is part of the Certificate Program in Labor Studies and is offered on the University of Missouri Interactive Video Network at UMKC, UMSL, and UMC.

A&S 350 Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 350A Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 350B Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 350H Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 350R Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 365P Introduction To Substance Abuse Counseling: Theory And Practice Credits: 3

This course will introduce the student to the problems of substance abuse and the methods/techniques used in treatment. The course will explore theories of personality and belief systems of the chemically dependent or alcoholic individual. The course will also review the impact of the disease on the family system

A&S 400B Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-6

A&S 400E Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-6

A&S 400G Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 400H Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 400PD Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-6

A&S 400RR Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 400SA Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-6

A&S 400SB Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 400SS Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 415 The Aging Body: Causes and Consequences Credits: 3

This course will explore biological changes that occur with aging. Plasticity, frailty, stress, coping, and chronic illness will be viewed through the bio-psycho-social lens. Biomedical discoveries and implications for the future of aging will be discussed.

A&S 490B Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 490PB Special Topics Credits: 1-3

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor.

A&S 490S Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 490SA Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 490SB Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 490W Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 492 Field Practicum In Aging Credits: 3-8

Students spend 180-480 contact hours in a field placement with supervision in a community agency or organization which services or advocates for older persons, and keep a journal documenting and reflecting on the practicum activities and experiences particularly as they relate to gerontological theory and research.

A&S 5500 Interdisciplinary Colloquium On Aging Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to gerontology as a field of study and as a profession. The context for the emergence of the field is set in important demographic transitions of the 20th century. Identification and understanding of major issues and controversies in the field will help locate the contributions of a range of disciplines to aging studies. The connection of these issues with the development of social policies will be discussed.

A&S 5500C Interdisciplinary Colloquium On Aging III Credits: 1-2

A&S 5500L Special Readings Topics/Philosophy Credits: 1-3

A&S 5500P Special Topics-Readings Psychology Credits: 1-3

A&S 5500Q Special Readings/Topics Theatre Credits: 1-3

A&S 5501 Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

This is a designated Arts and Sciences course which gives all departments in the College the flexibility to offer, on demand and as the need arises, a graduate-level readings course in a particular area of specialization in any discipline in the College. The individual departments determine the content of the course in any given semester in the same manner as any reading course, special topics, or independent study is presently handled. The departments are responsible for approving individuals or groups for the course and determine whether or not the course will be included as a part of a post-baccalaureate degree in their disciplines.

A&S 5501B Special Topics: Critical Thinking In Social Studies Credits: 1-3

A&S 5501D Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 5501E Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 5501K Special Topics Credits: 1-4

A&S 5502 Introduction To African American Studies Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to the contexts, theories, and methodologies that undergird African American studies. In addition to substantial time spent covering particular research skills and resources, students will also be introduced to African American culture and the issues related to African studies from several perspectives: history, literature, sociology, communication studies, and the like. Influences and perspectives from Africa, the Caribbean, and South America will also be covered. The course will thus provide a broad background in African American culture and history, an introduction to the methodologies of several disciplines, and discussion of particular contemporary and historical issues such as slavery, segregation and integration, the Civil Rights Movement, Pan-Africanism, Afrocentrism, and current political debates.

A&S 5505 Career Education And Transition In Special Education Credits: 3

This course is designed to increase awareness and knowledge about current disabilities legislation, vocational education, vocational rehabilitation, quality transition programs, school to work, self advocacy, workplace accommodations and comprehensive life skills learning.

Prerequisites: EDUC-SP 407 (or equivalent).

A&S 5509 Methods Of Inq: Research Issues And Methods In The Liberal Arts Credits: 3

This course serves as an introduction to various methods of inquiry and research in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. This course includes graduate level instruction in library research use of computer generated research tools and a strong emphasis on academic writing.

A&S 5515 The Aging Body: Causes and Consequences Credits: 3

This course will explore biological changes that occur with aging. Plasticity, frailty, stress, coping, and chronic illness will be viewed through the bio-psycho-social lens. Biomedical discoveries and implications for the future of aging will be discussed.

A&S 5520 Critical Choices: Final Research Project And Capstone Seminar Credits: 3

This seminar is designed as a capstone experience for students in the last semester of their studies in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program. Each student defines a final research project, spends the semester developing it, and presents his or her findings to the seminar at the conclusion of the course. Each project is intended to be thought-provoking and to be researched from an interdisciplinary point of view.

A&S 5535 Directed Studies In Liberal Arts Credits: 1-3

Open to students in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program, this course offers students the opportunity to pursue independent work at the graduate level on selected topics of an interdisciplinary nature, working with faculty members from at least two different departments. The course may not be repeated beyond a total of three credit hours.

A&S 5540 Liberal Arts Thesis Credits: 1-3

Open to students in the Masters of Arts in Liberal Studies Program who wish to include a written thesis in their program of studies. The course may not be repeated beyond a total of three credit hours.

A&S 5550 Seminar In Social Science Perspectives Study Of Community Credits: 3

A&S 5571A Seminar In The Social Sciences Credits: 1-6

This is a designated Arts and Sciences course which gives all departments in the College the flexibility to offer, on demand and as the need arises, a graduate level seminar in a particular area of specialization in any discipline in the college. The individual departments determine the content of the course in any given term in the same manner as any seminar is currently handled.

A&S 5572 Seminar In Philosophy Of Science I Credits: 3

A&S 5591 Practicum In Community Social Science Research Credits: 3

A&S 5592 Field Practicum In Aging Credits: 3-8

Students spend 180-480 hours in a field placement with the supervision in a community agency or organization which services or advocated for older persons and keep a journal documenting and reflecting on the practicum activities and experiences, particularly as related to gerontological theory and research. Students will study a particular subject relevant to their placement and describe this in a written project.

A&S 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Communication & Technology Courses

CIT 105P Foundations Of Computing And Problem Solving Credits: 4

This course covers the fundamentals of computer use, problem solving, and programming. Specific topics include: the general use of micro and mainframe computers, algorithm design, the relation of algorithms to programs, the fundamentals of programming in the PASCAL language, and program debugging techniques. This course is presented only in a PACE program format.

Co-requisites: MATH 110.

CIT 106P Computers: Their Uses And Impact Credits: 4

This course covers the history of computing, concepts in and classes of computer hardware and software, classes of computer application, economic issues in the development of computer hardware and software products, and philosophical, social and legal issues in the use (and abuse) of computer technology. This course is presented only in a PACE program format.

CIT 310P Web Design & Development Credits: 3

This three hour course, Web Design and Development, is designed to introduce the student to the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) and its use for the development of web pages. This course is offered online and no scheduled classroom attendance will be required. Correspondence through emails and the class forum is strongly encouraged.

Prerequisites: CIT 105P.

CIT 315P Web Graphics & Multimedia Credits: 3

This three hour course, Web Graphics and Multimedia, is a continuation to Web Design and Development. The course material will cover different development tools used to incorporate graphics, sounds, and videos into web pages. This course is offered online and no scheduled classroom attendance will be required. Correspondence through emails and the class forum is required.

Prerequisites: CIT 105P.

Pace - Interdiscip Studies Courses

INT-DISC 380P People With Special Needs: Education Planning Credits: 4

This course will address educational and psychological assessment strategies that result in a diagnosis of disability. Various specific disabilities and legal parameters for public education of people with disabilities will be discussed. Students will learn how to read and understand various educational and psychological assessment reports and will become knowledgeable about how to access community supports and services to address special needs in an education setting. By the end of the course students will have created a personal notebook of educational planning and accommodations for use as a resource for parents, teachers, or students in educational settings.

INT-DISC 381P People With Special Needs: Career Exploration Credits: 4

This course will address the issues that arise in career exploration and planning for people with a disability diagnosis. Students will become familiar with the philosophy of community inclusion and will learn how to plan based upon the unique strengths and interest of the individual. Career exploration tools will be explored in class and as assigned, and students will create a personal notebook to be used as a resource tool of accommodation materials and aides.

INT-DISC 382P People With Special Needs: Disability Service Settings Credits: 4

Independent study course: Students will meet at specific times as a group with the instructor, will write a term paper, and complete a 20 hour practicum in a pre-approved disability service setting.

INT-DISC 482P The Meanings Of Masculinity In Contemporary U.S. Culture Credits: 4

Topics include: Perspectives on Masculinity; Boyhood; Collegiate Masculinities: Privilege and Peril; Men and Work; Men and Health: Body & Mind; Men in Relationships; Male Sexualities; Men in Families; Masculinities in the Media; Men, Movements, and the Future. Small and large group discussions are anticipated in the classroom. Outside of the classroom, students will be expected to complete a series of assignments that are relevant to the topics at hand. This course would ideally incorporate UMKC faculty/staff and individuals/groups outside of the university who have completed research/work that seeks to understand men's lives better.

INT-DISC 483P Artful Man Embodied: Cultural Icons of Masculinity Credits: 4

This course will examine a variety of mediums used to "embody" meanings of masculinity (with special attention paid to shifting settings for one media source can alter its meaning drastically simple by being located in a different venue and/or time). This course will incorporate tours of, and works from, the Nelson-Atkins and Kemper Museums. Images by/of "men" to be examined include those found in the work of selected "masculine icon" authors; those found in popular culture; and those found in the everyday (seemingly mundane) worlds of family, work, and medicine. As the title of the course implies, students will explore historical ideas about bodies/embodiment (be they scientific, religious, social, etc.) into their image exploration.

Pace - Integrated Studies Courses

INTGR 200 Intermediate Pre-Hospital Life Support Credits: 4

This course is designed to increase the scope of practice for the Emergency Medical Technician who is considering becoming a paramedic. It encompasses EMS operations, and the management of various medical and trauma emergencies at the Intermediate level. Note: Admitted students in the UMKC Paramedic Program.

INTGR 200L Intermediate Pre-Hospital Life Support Laboratory Credits: 2

Laboratory applications for emergency medical science.

Prerequisites: Admitted student in the UMKC Emergency Medical Services Paramedic Program.

INTGR 201 Advanced Pre-Hospital Life Support I Credits: 4

This course encompasses EMS operations, as well as roles and responsibilities. Airway management, IV therapy, and management of various medical emergencies will be addressed. Students acquire the skills necessary to perform paramedic-level skills. These skills are practiced in the laboratory and clinical setting under close supervision.

Prerequisites: INTGR 200.

INTGR 202 Advanced Pre-Hospital Life Support II Credits: 4

This course encompasses the management of patients in the prehospital setting. Students acquire skills to perform interventions in the paramedic scope of practice. Skills are practiced in the laboratory and clinical settings under supervision, and during field internship with an ambulance provider. Note: Admitted students in the UMKC Paramedic Program.

Prerequisites: INTGR 201.

Natural Science, General Courses

NAT-SCI 101P Changing Life On Earth Credits: 4

This course presents an overview of issues relating to our ever changing world. It is research oriented with papers required on topics dealing with behavior, environmental issues, and aspects of evolution.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 102P.

NAT-SCI 102P Fundamentals Of Life Science Credits: 4

This course emphasizes the essential properties of biological systems through four major themes: diversity, the chemical and physical basis of life, continuity, and the organismal nature of life.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 103P.

NAT-SCI 103P Applications Of Life Sciences Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide students with laboratory exercises, field trips, films and discussions that help apply biological principles from 102P. New concepts are introduced throughout the course.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 102P.

NAT-SCI 130 Physics of Sports Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the physics involved in different sports. Physical laws and technological developments that impact sports will be studied.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 130, PHY-SCI 130.

NAT-SCI 140 How Things Work Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the principles of operations, histories, and relationships of objects from our daily environment. The areas of investigation include mechanical and thermal objects, electromagnetism, light, special materials and nuclear energy.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 140L.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 140, PHY-SCI 140.

NAT-SCI 140L How Things Work Laboratory Credit: 1

Simple experiments based on everyday experiences are analyzed in terms of conceptual physics. The material includes elements of mechanics of a rigid body, elastic properties of matter, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics and modern physics.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 140.

Cross Listings: Physics 140L and Phy-Sci 140L.

NAT-SCI 150 Astronomy: Motions of the Cosmos Credits: 3

An introductory exploration of modern topics in astronomy with an emphasis on developing conceptual models for the fundamental laws of gravity and motion crucial to the formation of stars and planetary systems, the growth of black holes and galaxies, and the evolution of cosmic structure.

Cross Listings: ASTR 150, PHYSICS 150, PHY-SCI 150.

NAT-SCI 153L Introductory Astronomy Laboratory Credits: 2

An introductory exploration of astronomical phenomena and concepts through quantitative laboratory activities requiring data collection, analysis and interpretation. This course is open to students from all majors. Concurrent enrollment in either Nat-Sci 150 or Nat-Sci 155 is encouraged but not required.

Cross Listings: Phy-Sci 153L and Physics 153L.

NAT-SCI 155 Astronomy: Starlight and Star Stuff Credits: 3

An introductory exploration of modern topics in astronomy with an emphasis on developing conceptual models for the interactions between light and matter crucial to the life and death of stars, the analysis of starlight and interstellar chemistry, and the interpretation of cosmic history.

Cross Listings: ASTR 155, PHYSICS 155, PHY-SCI 155.

NAT-SCI 171 Physics For Future Presidents Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the physics they need to be informed citizens in a democracy. Energy, global warming, terrorism, and health are examples of the important topics examined from the perspective of how science should inform policy.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 171, PHY-SCI 171.

NAT-SCI 375P Nature Of Science Credits: 4

Selected topics from the natural sciences. Provides students fundamental principles and concepts of various physical and mathematical sciences. Lectures, demonstrations and discussions provide an integrated approach to the natural sciences.

NAT-SCI 425P Introduction To Quantitative Methods Credits: 3

Topics addressed are the scientific approach to study of behavior (goals of science, research terminology, variables, distributions, measures of central tendency, confidence intervals, use of research methods and ethics in research), experimental design (validity, reliability, design and sampling techniques), and interpretation of research results. Course includes in-class computer data entry and analysis.

Prerequisites: COMP-SCI 101 and MATH 110 or MATH 116

Physical Science Courses

PHY-SCI 110 Foundations Of Physical Sciences I Credits: 4

Fundamental principles and concepts of the various physical and mathematical sciences, integrated by the history and philosophy of science.

PHY-SCI 110L Foundations Of Physical Sciences, Laboratory I Credit: 1

General laboratory and discussion sessions on various topics in the physical and mathematical sciences.

PHY-SCI 130 Physics of Sports Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the physics involved in different sports. Physical laws and technological developments that impact sports will be studied.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 130 and NAT-SCI 130.

PHY-SCI 140 How Things Work Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the principles of operations, histories, and relationships of objects from our daily environment. The areas of investigation include mechanical and thermal objects, electromagnetism, light, special materials and nuclear energy.

Co-requisites: PHY-SCI 140L.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 140, NAT-SCI 140.

PHY-SCI 140L How Things Work Laboratory Credit: 1

Simple experiments based on everyday experiences are analyzed in terms of conceptual physics. The material includes elements of mechanics of a rigid body, elastic properties of matter, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics and modern physics.

Co-requisites: PHY-SCI 140.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 140L and NAT-SCI 140L.

PHY-SCI 150 Astronomy: Motions of the Cosmos Credits: 3

An introductory exploration of modern topics in astronomy with an emphasis on developing conceptual models for the fundamental laws of gravity and motion crucial to the formation of stars and planetary systems, the growth of black holes and galaxies, and the evolution of cosmic structure.

Cross Listings: ASTR 150, PHYSICS 150, NAT-SCI 150.

PHY-SCI 153L Introductory Astronomy Laboratory Credits: 2

An introductory exploration of astronomical phenomena and concepts through quantitative laboratory activities requiring data collection, analysis and interpretation. This course is open to students from all majors. Concurrent enrollment in either PHY-SCI 150 or PHY-SCI 155 is encouraged but not required.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 153L and PHY-SCI 153L.

PHY-SCI 155 Astronomy: Starlight and Star Stuff Credits: 3

An introductory exploration of modern topics in astronomy with an emphasis on developing conceptual models for the interactions between light and matter crucial to the life and death of stars, the analysis of starlight and interstellar chemistry, and the interpretation of cosmic history.

Cross Listings: ASTR 155, PHYSICS 155, NAT-SCI 155.

PHY-SCI 171 Physics For Future Presidents Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the physics they need to be informed citizens in a democracy. Energy, global warming, terrorism, and health are examples of the important topics examined from the perspective of how science should inform policy.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 171, NAT-SCI 171.

PHY-SCI 410A Selected Topics In Contemporary Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 410B Selected Topics In Contemporary Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 410C Selected Topics in Contemporary Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 410P Selected Topics In Contemporary Science Credits: 3

Selected Topics In Contemporary Science

PHY-SCI 410PF Selected Topics In Contemporary Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 435 Selected Topics In The History Of Science Credits: 3

Selected Topics In The History Of Science

PHY-SCI 435P Selected Topics In The History Of Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 435PF Selected Topics In The History Of Science Credits: 3

Social Science Courses

SOC-SCI 301P Varieties - People and Society Credits: 4

This course will entail an intensive study of the sociocultural patterns in a selected nation. The discussions will focus on ethnic, racial and religious diversity in various national settings integrated with material in Soc Sci 303P.

Prerequisites: Block XVI or equivalent.

SOC-SCI 302P Power and Authority Credits: 4

This weeknight course is intended to deal with the issues of power and authority as they bear on people at the individual, family, social and political levels. The intent of the course is to discuss the issues of control, power, authority and the limits of obedience.

SOC-SCI 395C Economics Of Energy Credit: 1

See ECON 395C.

SOC-SCI 465P Human Resources In The Service Industry Credits: 4

This course will trace the historical development, and examine current policies and procedures of human resources in service organizations. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the evolving importance of employees in developing systems to meet operational goals. Management and labor perspectives on legal employment issues, compensations issues, and team development strategies will be examined.

SOC-SCI 5610 Philosophy Of Social Science Credits: 3

This course examines the development of the philosophy of science since the end of the 19th century. In this regard, Positivism, Conventionalism, and Realism as the three major conceptions of science will be studied and their significance as philosophical foundations of the social sciences will be assessed. Particular attention will be given to the emerging philosophy of science (i.e., Scientific Realism) which has profoundly challenged the more established Positivism.

SOC-SCI 5621 Consensus Social Theory Credits: 3

This course explicates the connections between mainstream (or orthodox) approaches in the various social sciences, which can be collectively viewed as Capitalist interdisciplinary social theory, Explication entails positivist philosophy of science, classic liberal political philosophy, neo-classical economics, pluralist political science, human ecology and functionalist sociology.

Prerequisites: SOC-SCI 5610.

SOC-SCI 5622 Pragmatism & Evolutionary Social Theory Credits: 3

Drawing on the classical pragmatism of Peirce and Dewey as the philosophical framework for inquiry, and the institutional economics of Veblen, Commons, Mitchell, and Ayres, this course develops Evolutionary Social Theory as a paradigm for interdisciplinary social science.

SOC-SCI 5630 Seminar in Research Methodology Credits: 3

This course assists students with the establishment of a framework for their dissertation research that represents a substantive integration of their coordination discipline with the SSC program. The ultimate goal of the seminar is a defensible dissertation proposal for each student. Includes opportunity for participation by supervisory committee members.

Prerequisites: SOC-SCI 5610, SOC-SCI 5621, and 1 Critical Theory course.

SOC-SCI 5641 History of a Social Science Discipline Econ Credits: 3

The course examines the social and political development of economics that underpins the development of economic theory in the 20th century.

Prerequisites: SOC-SCI 5610.

SOC-SCI 5690 Special Doctoral Reading in Social Science Credits: 1-3

Special Research Topic in Interdisciplinary Social Science at The Doctoral Level

SOC-SCI 5690A Special Topics Credits: 1-3

SOC-SCI 5690B Special Topics Credits: 1-3

SOC-SCI 5690C Special Topics Credits: 1-3

SOC-SCI 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1