Cockefair Hall, Room 106
5121 Rockhill Road
(816) 235-1305 or (816) 235-1307
Fax: (816) 235-1308
umkc-english@umkc.edu
http://cas.umkc.edu/english

Mailing Address
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Department of English Language and Literature
Cockefair Hall 106
5121 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110-2499

Chair: Virginia Blanton
Associate Chair: Jennifer Phegley

Professors:
Hadara Bar-Nadav, Virginia Blanton, Michelle Boisseau, Joan F. Dean, Stephen Dilks, Jane Greer, Christie Hodgen, James McKusick, Jennifer Phegley, Jeffrey Rydberg-Cox

Associate Professors:
John Barton, Laurie Ellinghausen, Jennifer Frangos, Daniel Mahala, Michael Pritchett, Anthony Shiu, Jacqueline Wood

Assistant Professors:
Whitney Terrell

Associate Teaching Professors:
Crystal Gorham Doss

Associate Research Professors:
Robert Stewart

Full-time Lecturers:
Sheila Honig, Cynthia Jones

Professors Emeriti:
Robert M. Farnsworth, Moira Ferguson, Daniel F. Jaffe, James McKinley, David Ray, Lois Spatz, Thomas Stroik, Linda Voigts, David Weinglass, Robert Willson

Associate Professors Emeriti:
Ralph Berets, James A. Reeds, Jonas Spatz

Department Description

The Department of English Language and Literature offers programs of study that lead to the Bachelor of Arts, the Master of Arts, the Master of Fine Arts, and the Interdisciplinary Doctor of Philosophy degrees. In the undergraduate program, students may pursue a general English program, or they may select an emphasis in Classical, Medieval and Early Modern Literature; Language and Rhetoric; or Creative Writing. Four minors in English are offered: Creative Writing, Language and Literature; Manuscript, Print Culture, Editing; and Writing. Master's in English students may focus their studies on Literature, or may select from two emphases: Language and Literature or Manuscript, Print Culture, and Editing. The M.F.A. in Creative Writing and Media Arts is an interdisciplinary program leading to a terminal degree. English is an academic discipline eligible for full participation in the University's Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program.

The Department of English includes faculty who have a broad range of professional competence in the study of literature and language, and who are trained to teach courses in British and American literature, linguistics, American culture, film, creative writing, and composition. The department believes the study and teaching of literature and language to be an important means of preserving and vitalizing our humanistic tradition.

Publications

The Department of English and the College of Arts and Sciences publish New Letters, a continuation of The University Review, which for over 50 years published the works of new and distinguished writers. New Letters continues to provide a medium for the best imaginative writing available.

The Department of English sponsors the publication of Number One, a magazine of student poetry and fiction, and The Sosland Journal, a collection of award-winning student essays from the Ilus W. Davis contest.

BkMk Press, operated under the auspices of the College of Arts and Sciences and housed in the Department of English, publishes books of high-quality poetry and prose by professional writers.

Related Information, Opportunities, and Conferences

The Department of English sponsors undergraduate and graduate student conferences, a writers' reading series, summer creative writing workshops, and annual contests in creative and expository writing. The Department offers additional scholarships for creative writers and students in literature, including the Diversity in English Scholarship for undergraduates. Graduate students are also eligible for the Farnsworth Fellowship. Interdisciplinary Ph.D. students can apply for the Ilus Davis Doctoral Teaching Fellowship. The Department also offers courses and an annual conference for English teachers as part of its continuing education function. Four student groups provide social and literary activities for majors and interested others: Undergraduate English Council, English Graduate Student Association, Graduate Students in Creative Writing, and Sigma Tau Delta (the international English honor society).

Career Implications of the Undergraduate Degree

The English major is recommended for students interested in a broad, general background in the humanities and in the skills of analysis, synthesis, and self-expression. It is excellent preparation for medicine, business, and law, as well as for further literary study in graduate school.

In addition to careers in education, writing, and editing, English majors with writing and editorial skills find that they are desirable candidates for positions in businesses where effective communication and written evaluation are required.

Advising System

All undergraduate English majors are assigned to the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Internships and Other Opportunities

Through the resources of the metropolitan media and publishing houses, as well as the on-campus facilities of the national literary journal New Letters, the literary publisher BkMk Press, and the academic journal, Eighteenth Century Theory & Interpretation, students may gain experience in writing and editing. With the approval of the supervising faculty, as well as the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students may intern with these media for credit. In addition, a number of other on- and off-campus internships are available for writers and editors.

Graduate Degrees

The Department of English offers three graduate programs: the Master of Arts: English; the Master of Fine Arts: Creative Writing and Media Arts; and the Interdisciplinary Ph.D.

Hadara Bar-Nadav2,3 Contact Information; professor of English; B.A. (William Paterson College); M.A. (Montclair State University); Ph.D. (University of Nebraska-Lincoln).

John C. Barton2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of English; B.A. (University of California-Berkeley); M.A., Ph.D. (University of California-Irvine).

Ralph A. Berets associate professor emeritus of English; B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Michigan).

Virginia Blanton2,3 Contact Information; professor of English; B.A. (Southwestern College); M.A., Ph.D. (Binghamton University).

Joan F. Dean2,3 Contact Information; curators' distinguished teaching professor of English; A.B. (Canisius College); M.A., Ph.D. (Purdue University).

Stephen Dilks2,3 Contact Information; professor of English; B.A. (University of Stirling, Scotland); M.A., Ph.D. (Rutgers University).

Crystal Gorham Doss Contact Information; associate teaching professor in English; B.A. (William Jewell College); M.A. (University of Kansas); Ph.D. (University at Buffalo).

Laurie Ellinghausen2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of English; B.A. (University of Houston), M.A. (Ohio State University), Ph.D. (University of California-Santa Barbara).

Robert M. Farnsworth professor emeritus of English; B.A. (University of Michigan); M.S. (University of Connecticut); Ph.D. (Tulane University).

Moira Ferguson professor emerita of English; B.A. (University of London, Birkbeck College); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Washington, Seattle).

Jennifer Frangos2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of English; B.A. (Vassar College); M.A. (State University of New York-Buffalo), Ph.D. (State University of New York-Stony Brook).

Jane Greer2,3 Contact Information; professor of English; B.A. (Hanover College); M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State University).

Christie Hodgen2,3 Contact Information; professor of English; B.A. (University of Virginia, Charlottesville); M.F.A. (Indiana University, Bloomington), Ph.D. (University of Missouri, Columbia).

Sheila Honig Contact Information; lecturer in English; B.A., M.A. (University of Missouri, Columbia).

Daniel Freeman Jaffe professor emeritus of English; B.A. (Rutgers University); M.A. (University of Michigan).

Cynthia Jones Contact Information; lecturer in English & Classics; B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Missouri-Kansas City).

Daniel Mahala2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of English; B.A. (State University of New York at Binghamton); M.A. (New York University); D.A. (State University of New York at Albany).

James C. McKinley Contact Information; professor emeritus of English; B.J., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Missouri, Columbia).

James McKusick2,3 Contact Information; professor of English; B.A. (Dartmouth College); M.A. (Yale University); M.Phil. (Yale University); Ph.D. (Yale University).

Jennifer Phegley2,3 Contact Information; professor of English; B.A. (Southwest Texas State University); M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State University).

Michael Pritchett2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of English; B.J. (University of Missouri, Columbia); M.F.A (Warren Wilson College).

David Ray professor emeritus of English; B.A., M.A. (University of Chicago).

James A. Reeds associate professor emeritus of English and linguistics; B.A., M.A. (University of Iowa); A.M., Ph.D. (University of Michigan).

Jeffrey A. Rydberg-Cox2,3 Contact Information; curators' distinguished professor of English and classics; B.A. (Colorado College); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago).

Anthony Shiu2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of English; B.A. (Ohio University); M.A. (University of Vermont), Ph.D. (Michigan State University).

Robert Stewart1 Contact Information; associate research professor of English and editor of New Letters; B.A. (University of Missouri-St. Louis), M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City).

Thomas Stroik2,3 Contact Information; curators' distinguished professor emeritus of English; B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

Whitney Terrell2,3 Contact Information; assistant professor of English; B.A., (Princeton University); M.F.A. (University of Iowa).

Linda E. Voigts Contact Information; curators' distinguished professor emerita of English; B.A. (William Jewell College); M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City); Ph.D. (University of Missouri, Columbia).

David H. Weinglass professor emeritus of English; B.A., M.A. (St. Catherine's College-University of Cambridge); Ph.D. (Kansas State University).

Robert F. Willson, Jr. Contact Information; professor emeritus of English; B.A. (Wayne State University); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin).

Jacqueline Wood2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of English & Black Studies; B.A. (Ohio Wesleyan University); M.A. (Florida Atlantic University); Ph.D. (University of Florida).

Bachelor of Arts: English

To major in English is to devote oneself to the study of culture, past and present; to books, their readers, writers, and publishers; to critical thinking and the interpretation of what it means to be human; to language and the communication of ideas in both written and spoken form. An education in English allows for a command of the written and spoken word. It is this command that allows those that have pursued a degree in English to find success in a variety of arenas through their ability to persuade and interpret, clarify ideas, think independently and creatively, and their overall commitment to the cultural repository that an English degree offers.

Students who choose to major in English Literature and Language develop their abilities to read and analyze texts written in the English language. They study British and American literature of the past and present and learn to view texts through a variety of interpretive lenses. English majors also develop their abilities as flexible, effective writers, capable of moving among a variety of genres, including creative and expository writing.

Within the 36-credit hour program, English majors take a core set of courses, including survey courses on the history of British and American literature, a course devoted to Shakespeare, and courses in linguistics and rhetoric. Beyond this core, students may choose to emphasize in the study of literature, rhetoric, creative writing, or classical, medieval, and early modern literature. In their final year, all students select from a menu of capstone options, including a senior thesis (recommended for students interested in graduate school), a seminar on teaching writing (recommended for students seeking certification to teach in secondary schools), or one of many upper-level seminars.

Students majoring in English may also consider a minor in another area of English studies, provided that there be no more than 9 credit hours of overlap between the major/emphasis and the minor

Undergraduate Admission Requirements

Preparation

Transfer students should enter the English major with soundly developed writing and reading skills and a general familiarity with the major authors and literary movements of English and American literature. Transfer students should meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies immediately upon admittance to discuss requirements and any possible transfer credits towards the major. With the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, the Department accepts up to 18 hours of transfer credits in English for courses fulfilling major requirements.

Undergraduate Programs

Bachelor of Arts: English

Bachelor of Arts: English Creative Writing Emphasis

Bachelor of Arts: English Classical, Medieval, & Early Modern Literature Emphasis

Bachelor of Arts: English Language and Rhetoric Emphasis

Teacher Certification in English

Minor in Creative Writing

Minor in Language and Literature

Minor in Manuscript, Print Culture, and Editing

Minor in Writing

Graduate Degrees:

Assistantships

The Department of English offers a limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships on a competitive basis. Applications for Graduate Teaching Assistantships are considered in January for the following fall semester. All Graduate Teaching Assistants are expected to enroll in at least six hours per semester. Graduate Teaching Assistantships may be awarded to students who demonstrate readiness to become teachers in first- and second-year writing courses. Graduate Teaching Assistants must undergo a pre-semester orientation and attend mentoring meetings twice monthly with the Director of Composition and fellow graduate teachers. First-semester GTAs are also required to complete successfully ENGLISH 5519.

Courses

ENGLISH 100B Basic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of speaking and listening for survival-level social functions in English. Frequent exercises focus on the production of isolated words and phrases in areas of need, and on the development of survival level oral/aural skills for beginning ESL students. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100C Basic Reading and Vocabulary for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of survival-level reading English vocabulary in context. Frequent exercises focus on basic reading comprehension related to familiar topics and situations, and the introduction of dictionary skills. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100D Basic Writing for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of survival level writing skills including spelling, capitalization and some punctuation. Introduction of basic sentence structures and completion of simple standard forms of written English. Frequent exercises focus on survival level writing such as words and basic phrases in the present tense. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100G Basic Grammar for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of survival level sentence structures and words. Frequent exercises focus on basic level sentences, questions, directions, and descriptions in the present tense that relate to students' immediate surroundings and some life skills areas. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100S Special Topics in English as a Second Language Credits: 1-6

A course designed to address the specific needs of an individual student or group of students studying English as a Second Language. In addition to targeting English skills, the course may address topics or skills which are not covered in the standard Academic English curriculum of the Applied Language Institute. This course will accommodate individual students or groups of students studying at the Institute for periods of time other than the standard semester length. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100T TOEFL Preparation Credits: 1-3

This course will prepare students to take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), in either the paper-based (PBT) or internet-based (iBT) form, and/or to improve their scores from previous attempts. Exercises focus on developing the skills and strategies necessary for navigating TOEFL questions while continuing to develop the general English language skills that support success on the TOEFL. The course will provide students with a personal awareness of strengths and weaknesses so they may focus their test preparation work in and outside of class. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101B Academic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers I Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of speaking and listening for basic social functions in English. Exercises include the practice of basic descriptions and the development of oral/aural skills for beginning ESL students. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101C Academic Reading and Vocabulary for Non-Native Speakers I Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of reading with basic English vocabulary in context. Exercises focus on reading comprehension, identifying the topics of short readings, and the introduction of basic dictionary skills. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101D Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers I Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of basic writing skills including handwriting, spelling, capitalization and punctuation. Frequent short exercises emphasize basic sentence structure, biographical description, and completion of standard forms. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101G Academic Grammar for Non-Native Speakers I Credits: 1-3

The study and practical application of basic sentence structure and word parts. Frequent exercises emphasize use and understanding of simple sentences, questions, directions, and descriptions in the present and past tenses. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 102B Academic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers II Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of speech in environments such as the classroom, work, and simple social occasions. Exercises focus on student's ability to distinguish sounds and to produce them correctly in the context of a sentence and to listen for specific information. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 102C Academic Reading and Vocabulary for Non-Native Speakers II Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of reading narrative and expository texts and standard forms. Exercises focus on the development of vocabulary and introduction of reading techniques such as identification of topics and main ideas, skimming, scanning, prediction, and inference. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Science.

ENGLISH 102D Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers II Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of techniques for writing short paragraphs in English. Frequent exercises emphasize various forms of paragraph organization and the improvement of punctuation and mechanical skills in writing. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 102G Academic Grammar for Non-Native Speakers II Credits: 1-3

The study and practical application of basic sentence structures, including future and irregular past tense constructions. Frequent exercises emphasize use and understanding of comparatives, questions, and compound nouns and verbs. This course carried no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103B Academic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers III Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of listening for and producing speech in the past, present and future tenses. Exercises introduce note-taking techniques and focus on the ability to hear and express abstract ideas. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103C Academic Reading and Vocabulary for Non-Native Speakers III Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of longer reading passages of various rhetorical styles. Exercises focus on improvement of reading speed and the development of vocabulary and comprehension through complex inferences. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103D Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers III Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of writing multi-paragraph academic essays. Frequent exercises emphasize point-of-view, process writing, and a variety of rhetorical styles. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103G Academic Grammar for Non-Native Speakers III Credits: 1-3

The study and practical application of complex sentence structures, including perfect and perfect progressive tenses. Frequent exercises emphasize use and understanding of passive voice, gerunds and infinitives, articles, conditionals, and modals. The course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 104B Academic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers IV Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of standard English, particularly in the college classroom. Exercises include training in academic lecture comprehension and note-taking as well as formal (classroom presentation) and informal (conversation) English speaking. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 104C Advanced Academic English Reading For Non-Native Speakers IV Credits: 1-3

This course focuses on preparing students to deal effectively with sophisticated academic reading materials by guiding them in the development of a conscious and reflective approach toward reading. It emphasizes advanced reading skills of interpretation, inference, critical analysis, evaluation and application. There will be frequent exercises addressing the acquisition and practice of study skills and collaborative academic work.

ENGLISH 104D Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers IV Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of rhetorical principles in standard English prose. Frequent writing exercises emphasize critical thinking and research skills as well as fluency and accuracy in academic writing. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 104G Advanced Academic English Grammar For Non-Native Speakers IV Credits: 1-3

This course focuses on the analytical understanding and application of English grammar. Students will be expected to observe usage patterns of the English language in a combination of both normative and prescriptive grammars appropriate for academic English application. There will be frequent exercises emphasizing mastery of complex grammar structures including all verb tenses, dependent clauses, modals, and unreal conditionals, and of the relationship between ideas and the construction of sentences in academic discourse.

ENGLISH 105B Advanced Speaking and Listening Topics for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

This course focuses on developing high-level fluency in English listening and speaking through critical awareness of social language use. Students will work toward greater speaking and listening fluency and adaptability through the practice of skills involving purpose, audience, speech norms and context.

ENGLISH 105C Advanced Reading and Vocabulary Topics for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

In this course, advanced ESL readers will develop the core critical reading skills required for success in academics by examining and applying those skills in the context of authentic college-level readings representing a wide variety of genres and modes. Readings will include extensive college textbook passages, newspaper articles, opinion sections, academic essays and interpretive reading of literature.

ENGLISH 105D Advanced Writing Topics for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

This course engages advanced ESL and EFL writers to develop greater dexterity of expression in composition. In addition to reinforcing core rhetorical skills, grammar and writing mechanics, students will explore new rhetorical styles such as personal responses, autobiographical essays, and writing about literature. Extensive reading complements the writing discussion and practice with pieces including personal and academic essays, narrative, magazine journalism and fiction.

ENGLISH 105G Advanced Grammar Topics for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

In this course, students will pursue an in-depth comprehension of English grammar, with a strong focus on increasing fluency in the English language through a critical analysis of connotation and pragmatics and their role in language fluency. Contextual readings, film and native conversation passages will complement the grammar discussions and practice, engaging students to move beyond a literal understanding based on syntax and semantics to a more contextual awareness of English form and function.

ENGLISH 110 English I: Introduction To Academic Prose Credits: 3

This course introduces students to college-level reading, writing, and discourse analysis: it engages students in the analysis and creation of texts that reveal multiple perspectives about specific rhetorical situations and cultural issues. In addition to learning how to revise by analyzing their own writing, students will learn to edit their own work and use proper academic documentation.


ENGLISH 110 - MOTR ENGL 100: Composition I
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 119 Myth and Literature Credits: 3

A study of classical myth including readings from Homer to Ovid, analysis of selected myths in later literature, art, and music, and a study of contemporary definitions and approaches to myth.

ENGLISH 120 Literary Monstrosities Credits: 3

This course explores representations of monsters in literature. Students are introduced to different ways of thinking about monstrosities from a range of cultural and historical perspectives, as well as through a variety of materials in order to approach this question from an interdisciplinary perspective.

ENGLISH 123 True Lives: Autobiographical Arts and Acts Credits: 3

This course explores life writing and other autobiographical practices. Students will read and analyze a variety of life writing forms and think critically about life writing in various cultural, historical, and social contexts. They will also examine autobiography as a form of self-expression, as an articulation of personal and social values, as a public art, and as a way to study human experience in different contexts. Genres may include memoir, autobiography, diaries, etc., at the discretion of the instructor.

ENGLISH 124 Writing About Literature Credits: 3

This course is designed to be taken either prior to or concurrent with a student's first literature course. It introduces students to literary criticism in its broadest, most generic sense, as a stylized response to reading. Students in the course will be introduced to different approaches to writing about literature, to methods of generating ideas, and focusing and developing a topic.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110.

ENGLISH 126 Popular Literature Credits: 3

This course is designed to help students develop a fuller understanding of the human condition by exploring a range of accessible, bestselling fiction and non-fiction from a variety of periods and places, historic and contemporary. The course may include popular stories, songs and ballads, the scripts of blockbuster plays and films, best-selling novels, and widely distributed nonfictional prose.


ENGLISH 126 - MOTR LITR 100: Introduction to Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 130 Introduction to Human Language Credits: 3

This course examines the biological and cultural properties of human language and it provides a foundation for understanding the role language plays in personal lives, in social institutions, and in the literary arts.

ENGLISH 141 Women and Literary Culture/The Heroine in Literature Credits: 3

This course explores the role of the heroine in literature. Students will examine how the heroine is crafted by a variety of writers and think critically about the role of the heroine in various cultural, historical, and social contexts. Genres may include science fiction/fantasy, mystery, romance, etc. at the discretion of the instructor.

ENGLISH 200 Introduction To Undergraduate Study In English Credits: 3

An investigation of reading, writing, and research practices associated with studies in English. Students will learn about multiple forms, genres, and critical approaches, as well as encounter texts from various historical periods and places. Required of all English majors before enrolling in 400-level ENGLISH courses.


ENGLISH 200 - MOTR LITR 100: Introduction to Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 203 Introduction to Journalism Credits: 3

Introduction to the styles and techniques of reporting and writing basic news through assignments in straight news, features and in-depth stories. Exposure to the history and principles of American journalism. Practical application in writing news and news feature articles.

ENGLISH 207 World Literature in English Credits: 3

This course helps students develop a fuller understanding of the human condition by exploring accessible literary texts in English by non Euro-American writers. The course provides historical, economic and political contexts and is designed for students who enjoy learning about global cultures by reading and discussing a diverse range of bestselling literature.


ENGLISH 207 - MOTR LITR 200: World Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 213 Introduction To Drama Credits: 2-3

Beginning with an intensive study of a few plays analyzed to elicit general principles, the course moves on to consider several representative examples of each of the major periods and types of Western drama, from the Greeks to the present.

ENGLISH 214 Introduction To Fiction Credits: 3

Students will be introduced to the study of fiction as a literary art form. Students will continue to develop their understanding of fiction-writing in preparation for more advanced courses in literature and creative writing. Coursework will focus on close reading of short and long forms of fiction selected from a range of literary periods and world literature. Students are expected to interpret and analyze various forms of fiction and write critically about the role of fiction as a form of cultural discourse.


ENGLISH 214 - MOTR LITR 100: Introduction to Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 215 Introduction To Poetry Credits: 3

An introduction to the study of poetry for students desiring a basic course either to develop a greater appreciation of poetry or to prepare for more advanced courses in literature or creative writing. Class discussions will focus on close readings of poems and analysis of poetic techniques. Writing assignments will complement reading and class discussion and will enable students to develop their own critical and creative skills.


ENGLISH 215 - MOTR LITR 100: Introduction to Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 216 The Craft of Creative Writing Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the key techniques that writers of imaginative literature use. Students will develop skills at writing and reading in multiple genres.

Prerequisites: DISC 100.

ENGLISH 225 English II: Intermediate Academic Prose Credits: 3

This course extends the work of ENGLISH 110 with an additional emphasis on research. Each section of ENGLISH 225 uses a combination of book-length and shorter texts on focus on specific historical and/or cultural issues. As they learn to participate in scholarly conversations, students will find and evaluate library and internet sources. As with ENGLISH 110, this course emphasizes revision, editing, and proper academic documentation. ENGLISH 225 or equivalent is a prerequisite for all 300 and 400 level ENGLISH courses.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110 and sophomore standing.


ENGLISH 225 - MOTR ENGL 200: Composition II
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 241 Women And Literary Culture: Introduction Credits: 3

The course offers an introduction to women as producers and consumers of literature. Students will become acquainted with women writers, explore women's reading practices, and interrogate the issues that have surrounded women's participation in cultural arenas.

ENGLISH 242 Women Writing/Women Reading Credits: 3

This course investigates women as producers and consumers of literature. Students will become acquainted with diverse women writers, explore women's reading practices, and interrogate the cultural, historical, and social contexts that influence women's writing and reading.

Prerequisites: Anchor I and DISC 100.


ENGLISH 242 - MOTR LITR 106: Women's Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 250 Introduction to Language Acquisition and Diversity Credits: 3

Investigation of the basic principles of first and second language acquisition. Topics addressed include language competency, socio-cultural factors in language, dialects, acquisitional principles, and language diversity. Students will take part in monitored classroom observations in public schools, and will critically analyze how the topics addressed in class apply to real life and to teaching situations.

ENGLISH 270 Writing Tutor Training Seminar Credits: 3

This course covers the basics of serving as a tutor for writers. Students acquire hands-on experience in consulting with writers at all stages of the writing process, including invention work, drafting, revising, documenting, and editing. Students will also become conversant in theories of peer tutoring and research on Writing Centers.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110.

ENGLISH 273 Science Fiction Credits: 3

This course focuses on a range of science fiction texts from a variety of periods and traditions. Students will examine the relationship between different types of science fiction from various periods and the related social, economic, and political contexts.

Prerequisites: DISC 100.

ENGLISH 278 Asian American Literature Credits: 3

This course examines literary and cultural texts produced by Asian Americans from the nineteenth century to the present. Texts will be drawn from a variety of genres and from several Asian American groups in order to examine how Asian American literature engages, challenges, revises, and reinvents American literary traditions. The course will identify and explore specific cultural and political issues that have shaped the writings, including trans-nationalism, immigration, racial identity, group identity, and community. Authors may include Carlos Bulosan, Maxine Hong Kingston, John Okada, Bienvendo Santos, and Hisaye Yamamoto.

Prerequisites: DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.


ENGLISH 278 - MOTR LITR 105: Multicultural Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 300CB Women in the Ancient World Credits: 3

This course focuses on the history, representation, literature, social lives, and political roles of women in ancient civilization including Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Biblical World, Greece, and Rome. It integrates methodologies from history, art history and archaeology, literary studies, and women's studies.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CD American Social Film:Silver Screen&American Dream Credits: 3

This course will combine American social history and film history in the sound era. Using Hollywood entertainment films, the course will look at Hollywood as an indicator of social, political and economic conditions in the United States since the 1930s. The main topics are representations of the American dream and nightmare, poverty and affluence, success and failure.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CE Radical Changes Since 1945 Credits: 3

This course will focus on modernism, post-modernism and expressionism in the visual arts and literature since World War II. Common lectures will address intellectual movements-such as existentialism and formalism--and cultural development--such as the increased impact of technology and mass media--in contemporary society. By focusing on these movements, the cluster course hopes to provide an integrated view of the literature and visual arts of the period and to draw upon analogous developments in contemporary architecture, music, philosophy and film.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CN Terrorism, Civil War And Trauma Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course examines the modern experience of terrorism and civil war in the light of art, film, history, literature, and philosophy. It explores a number of traumatic events, historic and contemporary, challenging us to think about such contemporary issues as violence and identity formation, civil rights and state-sponsored terrorism, pacifism and patriotism, resistance and collaboration, fundamentalism and fascism, neo-colonialism and anti-imperialism.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CW Critical Issues in Women's & Gender Studies Credits: 3

This class is an interdisciplinary upper-level course that will examine critical issues in women's and gender studies by focusing on the intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, and social context. Through their study of these intersections, students will be more sensitive to the impact of social structures on gender and the experiences of women and men.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CX Empire Credits: 3

This is an interdisciplinary, team-taught course designed to teach students ways to think about the complexities of human cultures, past and present, helping them examine how imperialism continues to shape contemporary understandings of personal, institutional, and cultural identities (both of selves and others). The course engages students in the analysis of global cultures with a focus on the economic, environmental, political and social consequences of specific imperial regimes and the ongoing impact of these regimes on particular groups that continue to live with the legacies of empire.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 OR DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CY Ancient World in Cinema Credits: 3

This course will explore the tradition of depicting the ancient Mediterranean world in film from the early silent era to the present. Topics to be covered include the ways that filmmakers respond to literary and historical sources from the ancient world, interact with the artistic tradition of films about the ancient world, the relation of these films to other works by the same creative personnel (directors, actors, writers, producers, etc.), and the political and cultural contexts in which the films were released.

ENGLISH 300F SS:Academic English/International Grad Teaching Assistants Credits: 3

The study and practice of standard spoken English combined with the study and practice of classroom teaching techniques. Exercises focusing on improvement of pronunciation, and formal (classroom presentation) and informal (conversation) English speaking are combined with techniques for lecture organization, strategies for clear content presentation, and with analysis of the American post-secondary educational culture. This course is designed for prospective International Graduate Teaching Assistants who need to improve their English communication skills and obtain an understanding of American educational culture.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 301WI Writing And The Academy Credits: 3

This course examines social and ethical issues raised by academic reading and writing. While some attention is paid to the formal aspects of academic prose within specific disciplines, the main emphasis of the course is on the cultural consequences of the different ways that academic knowledge is created and taught. In addition to studying the language and structure of academic reading and writing, the course explores the various rhetorics of the academy in terms of a broad range of subjects including economics, gender, education, history, and myth. This course satisfies the junior-level writing requirement and counts towards the writing minor.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 304WI Workplace Writing Credits: 3

This writing intensive course focuses on the rhetorical principles of workplace communication, providing students with opportunities to analyze complex rhetorical situations, to study various workplace genres, and to compose texts that meet the needs of diverse stakeholders.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 305WI Theory And Practice Of Composition Credits: 3

A course in expository writing that will include reading on composition theory and the nature of literacy. Frequent short essays and a long paper.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 306WI Advanced Composition Credits: 3

Further study of writing for those who wish to continue the study beyond the two semesters of composition. Emphasis will be placed on translating critical thinking into effective writing. Required of business and public administration majors.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 307WI Language, Literacy, Power Credits: 3

This course uses discourse analysis to investigate language and literacy. Students will explore how the discourses of institutional and cultural identities act as instruments of power and legitimacy.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 308 Rhetorics of New Media Credits: 3

This course will focus on the rhetorical study of new media texts (such as hypertext, networked multimedia, multimedia art and performance, virtual spaces, and so on) and theories of new media. The course will consider the rhetorical possibilities and constraints of new media and critically examine their impact on democratic discourse and literacy in the public sphere. Specialized knowledge of multimedia equipment and software is neither expected nor required.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 309WI Rhetorics of Public Memory Credits: 3

This course explores how museums and other cultural institutions function as rhetorical agents in creating and preserving public memory. Students will explore how processes of collection, arrangement, and visual display operate as modes of persuasion and make arguments about civic identities and community values.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 310 Introduction To Linguistics/Language Science Credits: 3

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the theory, methodology, and applications of the science of language. It examines properties of human language, covers all branches of language science, and provides a foundation for a critical understanding of language issues. Required for ENGLISH 470; recommended for ENGLISH 320 and ENGLISH 330.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 311 American Literature I Credits: 3

A survey of American literature and culture from its beginnings to 1865. This course will cover a range of authors, several genres, and culture forms, which may include fiction, poetry, drama, autobiography, oral, contact and/or slave narratives, folklore, and songs.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.


ENGLISH 311 - MOTR LITR 101: American Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 312 Creative Writing I Fiction Credits: 3

A course centered on the short story. Emphasis is placed on three areas: general principles governing the writing of fiction; practice in short fiction (primarily the short story, but including the novella); criticism; and technical skills (including editing and rewriting).

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 313WI Reporting Credits: 3

A seminar of practical application in advanced reporting. Assignments to cover news events and to pursue in-depth news reports on the campus and off.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 203 or ENGLISH 203; RooWriter.

ENGLISH 315 Creative Writing Poetry Credits: 3

Writing and rewriting poems, with discussion of techniques needed to produce desired effects. Analysis and evaluation of student work. Examination of technical means utilized in selected poems by accomplished poets.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 316WI Literary Nonfiction Credits: 3

Literary Nonfiction is a writing intensive course in the reading and writing of nonfiction prose as a literary art. We'll survey the historical development of literary nonfiction (especially the essay), sample contemporary authors of the genre, write critical commentary on works we read, and compose personal essays of our own. The course is not exclusively a literary seminar nor a creative writing workshop, but seeks to mix and make connections between these modes, in the tradition of the essay itself.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, and RooWriter.

ENGLISH 317 British Literature I Credits: 3

A survey of British Literature and culture from its beginnings to the 18th century, including works by Chaucer and Milton.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.


ENGLISH 317 - MOTR LITR 102: British Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 318 Bible As Literature Credits: 3

A critical study of the major portions of the Old and New Testaments and the Apocrypha, with special attention to the development of literature from oral tradition, the literary genres, themes and archetypes represented in the collection, and the diction and style which have influenced later literature. Consideration also of the relation of Biblical literature to the historical, religious, and cultural milieu of the ancient Near East.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 320 Structure Of English Credits: 3

Not a remedial grammar course. Methods of linguistic inquiry and grammatical description. Study of traditional and modern schools of syntax, especially transformational grammar. Practice describing the structure of sentences. Application to the teaching of grammar in high schools.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 321 American Literature II Credits: 3

A survey of American literature and culture from 1865 to the present. This course will cover a range of authors, several genres, and culture forms, which may include fiction, poetry, drama, autobiography, essay, lyrics, and film.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.


ENGLISH 321 - MOTR LITR 101: American Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 323 Shakespeare Credits: 3

An intensive critical study of William Shakespeare's writings in various contexts (historical, social, political, literary, contemporary, for example). Readings will encompass at least eight plays and will include at least one comedy, history, tragedy, and romance. Required of all English majors.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 325 Arthurian Legends Credits: 3

Focusing on writers such as Marie de France, Chretien de Troyes, Sir Thomas Malory, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Sara Teasdale, Bernard Malamud, and Marion Zimmer Bradley, this course examines the legend of King Arthur and his Round Table as a recurring myth, repeatedly manifested in time through literature, art, history, music, and film.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 326 Modern And Contemporary Irish Literature Credits: 3

This course examines a range of texts written by Irish-born writers from the end of the nineteenth century on. While it is likely the course will include texts by the most famous Irish writers, such as Yeats, Joyce, Beckett, O'Brien, Heaney, and Friel, course materials will vary from semester to semester and may focus on a specific genre, historical period, or area of interest.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 327 British Literature II Credits: 3

A survey of British Literature and culture from the late 18th century to the present. This course will cover a range of authors and genres, including at least one novel.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.


ENGLISH 327 - MOTR LITR 102: British Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 330 History Of The English Language Credits: 3

The study of English beginning with the Indo-European language family up to and including varieties of English spoken around the world today. Both outer history and the inner history of phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon will be addressed.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 331 African American Literature I Credits: 3

This course provides a survey of African American literature from its beginnings to the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920's and 1930's. Areas of interest will include abolitionist literature (especially Slave Narratives), turn-of-the-century literature and the Harlem Renaissance. This course will examine any or all of the following literary forms: fiction, poetry, drama, autobiography and essay. It will view African American literature in its historical and cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.


ENGLISH 331 - MOTR LITR 105: Multicultural Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ENGLISH 332WI African American Novel Credits: 3

This course will examine the African American Novel in the 19th and 20th centuries. The novels will be examined in their historical and cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 333 African American Literature II Credits: 3

A survey of African American literature from the end of the Harlem Renaissance to the present, covering a range of authors, texts, and contexts.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 336 Contemporary American Literature Credits: 3

This course focuses on contemporary American literature, concentrating on literary and cultural change. Topics, genres, and authors discussed will vary each semester.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 337 Introduction to American Literary and Cultural Studies Credits: 3

This course focuses on American literary and cultural production in an interdisciplinary manner. It explores how social, political, and economic conditions interact with the fields of art, film, history, and literature from colonial times to the present.

ENGLISH 339 Introduction to Screenwriting Credits: 3

An introduction to the form and language of the motion picture screenplays. Students create a blueprint for a movie and examine visual storytelling in-depth, including basic dramatic structure, scene and sequence construction and dialogue. Students will master the industry screenplay format, adapt a short story for the screen, and learn to receive feedback in small groups.

Prerequisites: DISC 200 or ENGLISH 225.

ENGLISH 340AWI Classical Literature in Translation Credits: 3

This course will focus on representative authors and works from the Greek and Roman Classical periods, such as Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Aeschylus, Aristophanes, Plato, the Greek Lyrics, Virgil, Horace, Juvenal, Ovid and Plautus.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

ENGLISH 342WI Women And Rhetoric Credits: 3

A study of the position of women within the traditions of western rhetoric. Students will examine the rhetorical practices of women as they pursue both public and private goals. Christine de Pizan, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Hannah More, Maria Stewart, Frances Willard, Ida Wells-Barnett, Meridel Le Sueur, and Gloria Anzaldua are among the female rhetorians who may be studied in this course.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 344WI Women & Literary Culture: Genre Focus Credits: 3

A study of women writers that focuses on genre, i.e., texts that share a common set of conventions. The course will explore the conventions associated with a particular genre in various historical periods and consider the ways in which gender and genre intersect in shaping texts and their interpretation.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 345WI Women And Literary Culture: Historical Focus Credits: 3

A study of women's literary culture in a specific historical period either as broadly defined as Medieval or Renaissance or as narrowly defined as a decade or movement (e.g., 1960's, abolitionist movement). This course includes women writers across multiple boundaries (e.g., national, generic, racial, sexual, socio-economic). Content will change depending on the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 350 The 18th Century Novel Credits: 3

A detailed examination of the development of the novel in the 18th century. The course emphasizes the evolution of the novel from such predecessors as rogue literature, the picaresque story and the romance, due to changing social realities. The novelists studied may include Austen, Behn, Fielding, Godwin, Haywood, Richardson, Smollett, and Sterne.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 351 Special Readings Credits: 1-3

Readings in a period, genre or theme to be selected by the instructor with attention to the needs of students who are interested in literary topics not covered in regular offerings. Proposals for a course in such readings require the approval of the department.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 351A Special Readings: Detective Fiction Credits: 3

This course will focus on a specific period, sub-genre, or theme related to Detective fiction.

Prerequisites: Anchor II, DISC 200.

ENGLISH 355 The Novel Before 1900 Credits: 3

Intensive attention to novels in English written before 1900, which may include comparative or analytical studies of genre; critical reception of novels; serialization, gender issues; authors and editors; and valuation.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 356 Studies in Poetry Credits: 3

An intensive study of poetry through the examination of a specific topic or the works of particular poets, for instance: Love, Seduction, and Betrayal; Form and Change; Death, Grief, and Consolation; Whitman, Dickinson, and the Soul; Sacred Poetry; Poetry and Metaphysics; The Long Poem; The Comic Poem; Sonnet, Sonnet Sequence and the Lyric; The Voyage; Nature, Self, and the Romantic Poet.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 360 The Modern Novel Credits: 3

This course focuses on selected novelists between 1900 and 1945 and is organized around particular literary themes, sub-genres, or contemporary issues.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 365 Contemporary Novel Credits: 3

This course focuses on selected novelists since 1945 and is organized around particular literary themes, sub-genres, or contemporary issues.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 365WI Contemporary Novel Credits: 3

This course focuses on selected novelists since 1945 and is organized around particular literary themes, sub-genres, or contemporary issues.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 367 Introduction to Latinx Literature Credits: 3

An introduction to the literary production by US Latinx, the course introduces students to writings by authors from various Latinidades—such as Chicana/Chicano, Puerto Rican, Chilean American, Cuban American, Dominican American, and Mexican American—in multiple genres, including poetry, fiction, drama, personal essay, and film.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 376 Concepts of the Hero in Ancient Literature and World Cinema Credits: 3

This course explores how concepts of heroism are related to the principles of values and civic duty in a wide range of ancient world cultures and contemporary world cinemas. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of how these values impact individual heroes and their interactions with others in their society.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 378 Asian American Literature Credits: 3

This course examines literary and cultural texts produced by Asian Americans from the nineteenth century to the present. Texts will be drawn from a variety of genres and from several Asian American groups in order to examine how Asian American literature engages, challenges, revises, and reinvents American literary traditions. The course will identify and explore specific cultural and political issues that have shaped the writings, including transnationalism, immigration, racial identity, group identity, and community. Authors may include Carlos Bulosan, Maxine Hong Kingston, John Okada, Bienvendo Santos, and Hisaye Yamamoto.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 404 Old English Credits: 3

This course is a study of Old English, its grammar, its poetic style, and its literature, both poetry and prose.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 405 Magazine Editing Credits: 3

A course combining academic study of editorial management, publishing operations and language skills, with "hands on" experience in article evaluation, editing, magazine production, and legal matters such as copyright and libel. Class work concentrates on authentic and effective language use, with attention given to copy editing, grammar, typography, printing processes, financing and distribution for commercial and small-press publications.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 408 Harlem Renaissance Credits: 3

This course examines the period from 1920 to 1940, known as the Harlem Renaissance, a time of unprecedented literary and cultural creativity by Black artists. This course explores a variety of cultural productions, not only traditional forms of literature such as novels, short stories, plays and poetry, but also nonliterary objects of study such as painting, sculpture, and music.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 410 Black Women Writers Credits: 3

This course explores the writings of African American Women Writers. The course examines how these writers have interacted with and often revised stereotypical representations of African American womanhood typically found within canonical and African American male literatures. The course will examine literature (which might include fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama) of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the majority of the works will be by modern and contemporary authors such as Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, and Terry McMillan. By placing the works in this sort of cultural and historical context, it will be possible to examine the unique tradition of African American women's writing as well as individual texts.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 412 Chaucer Credits: 3

Readings from Chaucer's most important works, especially "The Canterbury Tales" and "Troilus and Criseyde" with emphasis on them as types of medieval genres and on the Middle English language.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 413 Renaissance Literature I Credits: 3

English literature from the time of Wyatt and Surrey to the beginning of the 17th century, including the works of Spenser, Marlowe, Sidney, Shakespeare and others.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 414 Milton Credits: 3

A study of Milton's prose and poetry, with special attention to "Paradise Lost".

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 415 Restoration And Early 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the late 17th century to the mid 18th century. Selected writers may include Addison and Steele, Behn, Congreve, Defoe, Dryden, Finch, Milton, Pope, Rochester, Swift, and Wortley Montagu.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 416 The Romantic Period Credits: 3

An extensive study of selected writers (such as Austen, Barbauld, Byron, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Hemans, Keats, Gilpin, the Shelleys, Wollstonecraft, and Wordsworth) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Romantic period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 417 Modern Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by modernist poets such as Hopkins, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Moore, Pound, H.D., Eliot, Millay, Hughes.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 418 19th-Century American Literature Credits: 3

An intensive study of either selected major American writers in the 19th century or of 19th -century literary movements.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 311.

ENGLISH 422 Medieval Literature Credits: 3

Western religious and secular verse and prose to the 15th century. Late Middle English works are read in the original; all other selections in translation.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 423 Renaissance Literature II Credits: 3

English literature from 1600 to the beginning of the Restoration, including the works of Donne, Jonson, Milton and other contemporaries.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 425 18th-Century British Literature II Credits: 3

British literature in its critical and historical context from 1750 to 1798. The writers studied may include Blake, Burney, Collins, Johnson, and Gray.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 426 The Victorian Period Credits: 3

An intensive study of selected writers (such as Arnold, Braddon, the Brontes, the Brownings, Dickens, Darwin, Eliot, Gaskell, Hardy, Ruskin, and the Rossettis) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Victorian period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 427 Contemporary Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by contemporary poets (post World War II), such as Auden, Bishop, Hayden, Berryman, Rukeyser, Larkin, Rich, Plath, Heaney, Boland, Komunyakaa.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 428 20th-Century American Literature Credits: 3

An intensive study of either selected major American writers in the 20th century or of 20th-century literary movements.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 321.

ENGLISH 429B Advanced Screenwriting Credits: 3

This course provides students with advanced theory in narrative screenwriting, training in industry standard script analysis (called "coverage") and story editing. Students will be required to draft, revise and workshop a short film screenplay or will focus on a feature screenplay, delivering a draft and revision of the first act and a detailed outline for the rest of the script. Students will workshop feature screenplays in small groups, emphasizing the art of constructive story editing.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 339 or COMM-ST 354.

ENGLISH 431 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the mid to late 18th century. Selected writers may include Blake, Burney, Collins, Equiano, Fielding, Gray, Johnson, Sheridan, and Wollstonecraft.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 432WI Advanced Creative Writing Prose Credits: 3

A course for advanced students of fiction writing. Open to students who have taken English 312 or its equivalent. The class will proceed through analysis of models, discussion of general principles, critique of student work. Students will simultaneously be encouraged to experiment and to refine the form and subjects best suited to their talents. Emphasis will remain on the short story, though there may be units in other forms--novella, film script, the non-fiction essay.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 433 Histories Of Writing, Reading, And Publishing Credits: 3

A study of selected topics concerning the material practices of writing, reading, and publishing within specific cultural and historical contexts. Issues examined may include authorship, education, information technologies, libraries, literacy, periodicals, popular literature, publishers, and communities of readers.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, one appropriate introductory course at the 300 level.

ENGLISH 434 Postcolonial Literature Credits: 3

An exploration of postcolonialism through the study of literary and theoretical texts created by or representing peoples whose historical experience has been decisively shaped by the experience or legacies of colonialism. Texts will be drawn from a variety of genres and from several countries. The course will consider several definitions of postcolonialism and related terms such as cosmopolitanism, hybridity, diaspora, and nationalism.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 435WI Advanced Creative Writing Poetry Credits: 3

An advanced poetry workshop that includes intensive reading of contemporary poetry and aims at each student creating a portfolio of publishable poems. The focus of the course will vary to address a variety of topics such as metaphor and closure; imitation and the line; form and voice. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 315, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 436WI Poetic Forms Credits: 3

An advanced creative writing course that focuses on intensive study of and practice in metrics and traditional and nonce forms. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 315, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 437WI Prose Forms Credits: 3

The making of a work of prose requires expertise with the structure of the chosen form, and an understanding of the relationship of form to content. This class teaches the techniques for planning and drafting major prose forms which could include the very-short story, the story, novella, novel, linked-story collection, episodic novel, essay novel, the play, the creative nonfiction book, and others. Students will learn how to create particular prose forms and how to use content as a guide to inventing new forms. We will examine some of the best examples of both traditional and newly invented forms by writers such as Anton Chekhov, Katherine Anne Porter, Tim O'Brien, and Sandra Cisneros.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 312, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 438 The "New Letters" Writing Conference Credits: 1-3

An intensive weekend conference for creative writers of varying genres and levels of experience, published and unpublished -- fiction, poetry, nonfiction, stage and screen. The conference includes creative and interdisciplinary sessions on writing and publishing, genre-specific workshops, socializing and networking opportunities, and private manuscript consultations. The course of study for two-and three-credit students includes selected reading and post-weekend tutorial time conducted by accomplished, working writers. The conference may be repeated once for credit. Two- and three-credit students need the instructor's consent and must have taken a 300-level creative-writing course in the focus genre prior to enrolling.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 439 Shakespeare and Film Credits: 3

Grounded in the close analysis of texts, this course examines film adaptations of Shakespeare's plays across the range of dramatic genres (history plays, tragedy, comedy, and romance). This course is open to seniors and graduate students only. Graduate students will be responsible for supplemental critical readings.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 323.

ENGLISH 440 American Culture Credits: 3

Texts that offer perspectives on key historical themes of American culture. Texts may be grouped around any culturally significant principle (e.g. region, race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion) or theme (e.g. the mythology of the frontier, marriage and domesticity, the American Dream). The course may be taken twice for credit, provided substantive changes in topic.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 311 and ENGLISH 321.

ENGLISH 441 Girls And Print Culture Credits: 3

This course deals with girls' relationships to the continually evolving print culture. Students will examine various literary representations of girlhood by adult writers, explore texts directed at girls (e.g., conduct books, periodicals, textbooks), and study the writing and reading practices of girls themselves.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 442 Playwriting I Credits: 3

Theory and practice of writing for the theatre with emphasis on the basic techniques.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 443 Playwriting II Credits: 3

Theory and practice of writing for the theatre with emphasis on advanced techniques.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 445 History And Principles Of Rhetoric Credits: 3

A study of selected writings of ancient, and modern rhetoricians illustrating key issues in the development of Western discourse theory and practice. Issues examined include the relationships between rhetoric and knowledge, orality and literacy, and rhetoric and poetics. Attention will also be given to the implications of rhetorical theory for modern language instruction.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 447 Theory and Criticism in English Studies Credits: 3

A survey of major schools and methods of literary theory and criticism. Authors and texts to be determined by the instructor of the course.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, junior or senior standing and six hours of literature.

ENGLISH 448 External Internship Credits: 1-3

Students may complete an external internship involving writing and editing with a publishing company, trade magazine, literary or academic journal, other print or electronic media organization, or with advertising, public relations, or non-profit firms. Internships are granted on a competitive basis. Students will compile a portfolio of their work under the direction of the internship supervisor to be submitted for evaluation to the department's internship coordinator.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 449A Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course provides practical experience with New Letters magazine, New Letters on the Air, and BkMk Press in business analysis/reporting, copy-editing, manuscript evaluation, promotion/grant development, library research, market research, and other skills. The practicum is limited to three students per semester, to be chosen on the basis of demonstrated writing and organizational skills. References are required. May be taken for no more than three credit hours over a maximum of two semesters.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200; Permission of the instructor.

ENGLISH 449B Publication Practicum Credits: 3

This course covers the basics of producing an issue of an academic journal. Students acquire hands-on experience at all stages of production.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 449C Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course allows students to work with a faculty member on an ad hoc project for publication such as a special journal issue or festschrift, book manuscript, a new scholarly edition of a primary text, or a digital edition. Course may be repeated once for continued work on the same project.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 450 Special Readings Credits: 1-3

Intensive individual readings in a field, genre, or individual figure to be selected by a student or a group of students in consultation with an instructor willing to direct the project. Generally limited to graduating seniors who have completed the majority of the work for their major. Not open to students in their first semester at UMKC. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 451 Shakespeare Comedies And Histories Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major comedies and history plays with special emphasis on his dramatic works before 1600.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317 and ENGLISH 323.

ENGLISH 452 Early English Drama Credits: 3

English religious and secular drama prior to Shakespeare. Mystery and morality plays are studied, with emphasis on their literary and social backgrounds. Close reading of such works as "Everyman," "The Wakefield Second Shepherd's Play," and "The Spanish Tragedy."

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317 and ENGLISH 323.

ENGLISH 453 Modern Drama, 1880-1945 Credits: 3

A study of modern drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory, and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the earlier modern playwrights from Ibsen and Shaw, with special attention to naturalism.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 454 The Civil Rights Movement in African American Literature Credits: 3

This course examines how African American literature shaped ideas about freedom, rights, citizenship and race in the civil rights movement. It draws on a variety of literary forms-speeches, essays, autobiographies, fiction, drama, poetry and film-to explore the movement's impact on communities and cultures as well as its various debates and competing visions.

ENGLISH 455 Studies In The Novel 1740-1900 Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major novelists of the eighteenth or nineteenth century. The content of the course will change, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, completion of six hours of literature.

ENGLISH 456 From Field Shout to Hip Hop: African American Poetic Traditions Credits: 3

This course examines the development of African American poetry from its early forms as field shouts, ballads, and blues to present forms including spoken word and hip hop. Includes authors such as Phillis Wheatley, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Tupac Shakur, and Jessica Care Moore.

ENGLISH 457 Stages Toward Freedom: African American Dramatic Traditions Credits: 3

This course explores the development of African American dramatic traditions from the eighteenth century through the Harlem Renaissance Black Arts Movement, to current postmodernism. Includes authors such as W.W. Brown, Zoran N. Hurston, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks.

ENGLISH 458 Slave Narratives: Race, Gender, and Writing Freedom Credits: 3

A truly American, home grown genre and powerful force in the development of American political and social realities, the African American Slave Narrative is an established, recognized influence in the development of African American and American literary history. In this course you will have the opportunity to explore the historical trajectory of the Slave Narrative, looking at early formulations of its structure, purpose and conventions—especially in terms of gender and race, subsequent various permutations, and the eventual development of the Neo-slave Narrative as its resurrection, which adds to the complexity and theoretical impact of the literary autobiography from black perspectives.

ENGLISH 459 African American Migrations in Literature Credits: 3

The course examines representations of two different trajectories of migration in African American literature: African American journeys from the south to northern and mid-western regions of America, and concurrent migrations of Caribbean people to the US in the early twentieth century.

ENGLISH 460 Special Offerings Credits: 1-4

The visiting professor who gives this course determines what its content shall be. All aspects of literature and linguistics are within its possible range.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200. .

ENGLISH 461 Shakespeare Tragedies And Romances Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major tragedies and late romances with special emphasis on his dramatic literature after 1600.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317 and ENGLISH 323.

ENGLISH 462 Restoration And 18th-Century Drama Credits: 3

The drama after the restoration of the monarchy and the reopening of the theaters through the 18th century. Special emphasis is placed on the comedy of manners and the heroic drama in the Restoration and the sentimental comedy in the 18th century. Includes such playwrights as Dryden, Congreve, Etherege, Wycherley, Steele, Lillo, Cumberland, Sheridan, and Goldsmith.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 463 Contemporary Drama II Credits: 3

A study of contemporary drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the more recent writers, including the absurdists, with special attention to experimental drama.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 464 Medieval Methods & Paleography Credits: 3

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of medieval handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will examine the historical and cultural settings for medieval texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textural transmission in the medieval world. In addition to gaining familiarity with the many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for practical archival work in various European nations.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, First Year Latin.

ENGLISH 465 Studies In The Modern Novel Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major 20th-century novelists. The content of the course will change, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, completion of six hours of literature.

ENGLISH 468 Women's Literature in Africa and the African Diaspora Credits: 3

This course is a comparative examination of the variety of literary works produced by women of African descent in the United States, the Caribbean and Africa. Students will explore the cross-cultural implications of texts in light of the intersections of gender, race and class.

ENGLISH 470 Introduction To Descriptive Linguistics Credits: 3

General introduction to linguistics science. Linguistic analysis, structures and change. Language families. Historical reconstruction. Generative grammar.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 310.

ENGLISH 475 Creative Nonfiction Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the study and crafting of creative nonfiction. special attention is given to developing the writing techniques required to shape publishable narratives out of experience.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200, ENGLISH 312, ENGLISH 315, ENGLISH 316WI..

ENGLISH 499 Senior Tutorial Credits: 3

A comprehensive tutorial for students who have a faculty-approved research project. The project will culminate in a critical study of 20-25 pages or a creative writing portfolio of similar length. This course is appropriate for students who intend to continue their studies at the graduate level.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 5500 Graduate Study In English Credits: 3

An introduction to methods of research and scholarship related to English studies. The course uses a wide spectrum of print and digital materials, library facilities (including archives and Special Collections), databases, and other resources to explore English studies as an academic discipline and profession.

ENGLISH 5500P Special Topics Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5501 Magazine Editing Credits: 3

A course combining academic study of editorial management, publishing operations, and language skills, with "hands on" experience in article evaluation, editing, magazine production, and legal matters such as copy right and libel. Class work concentrates on authentic and effective language use, with attention given to copy editing, grammar, typography, printing processes, financing and distribution for commercial and small-press publications.

ENGLISH 5502 Magazine Nonfiction Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the origination and execution of nonfiction magazine articles for a variety of publications. Special attention is given to successful queries and the various writing techniques required for different kinds or articles. Students learn re-structuring and revision and the legalities affecting writers. Students are expected to complete three publishable articles.

ENGLISH 5503 Old English Credits: 3

This course is a study of Old English, its grammar, its poetic style, and its literature, both poetry and prose.

ENGLISH 5508 Harlem Renaissance Credits: 3

This course examines the period from 1920 to 1940, known as the Harlem Renaissance, a time of unprecedented literary and cultural creativity by Black artists. This course explores a variety of cultural productions, not only traditional forms of literature such as novels, short stories, plays and poetry, but also nonliterary objects of study such as painting, sculpture, and music.

ENGLISH 5510 Black Women Writers Credits: 3

This course explores the writings of African American Women Writers. The course examines how these writers have interacted with and often revised stereotypical representations of African American womanhood typically found within canonical and African American male literatures. The course will examine literature (which might include fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama) of the 19th and 20th centuries; the majority of the works will be by modern and contemporary authors such as Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, and Terry McMillan. By placing the works in this sort of cultural and historical context, it will be possible to examine the unique tradition of African American women's writings as well as individual texts.

ENGLISH 5512 Chaucer Credits: 3

Readings from Chaucer's most important works, especially "The Canterbury Tales" and "Troilus and Criseyde" with emphasis on them as types of medieval genres and on the Middle English language. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5513 Renaissance Literature I Credits: 3

English literature from the time of Wyatt and Surrey to the beginning of the 17th century, including the works of Spenser, Marlowe, Sidney, Shakespeare and others. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5514 Milton Credits: 3

A study of Milton's prose and poetry, with special attention to "Paradise Lost". Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5515 Restoration And Early 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the late 17th century to the mid-18th cetury. Selected writers may include Addison and Steele, Behn, Congreve, Defoe, Dryden, Finch, Pope, Rochester, Swift, and Wortley Montagu.

ENGLISH 5516 The Romantic Period Credits: 3

An extensive study of selected writers (such as Austen, Barbauld, Byron, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Hemans, Keats, Gilpin, the Shelleys, Wollstonecraft, and Wordsworth) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Romantic period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 5517 Modern Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by modernist poets such as Hopkins, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Moore, Pound, H.D., Eliot, Millay, Hughes. Students will make in class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographic work.

ENGLISH 5518 19th-Century American Literature Credits: 3

An intensive study of either selected major American writers in the 19th century or of 19th-century literary movements. Students will make in class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5519 Teaching Writing: Theories, Histories, Contexts, Practices Credits: 3

This course focuses on issues related to the teaching of English at the high school and college levels, with an emphasis on the teaching of writing. Issues addressed may include assignment design, teaching invention and revision, response to and evaluation of writing, collaborative learning, relationships between reading and writing, classroom uses of electronic media, and institutional contexts within which teachers work. The course is required of Graduate Teaching Assistants in the UMKC Composition Program, to be taken either prior to or concurrently with their first semester of teaching. Secondary English teachers and others interested in English teaching are also welcome.

ENGLISH 5520 Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

Studies in methods and objectives for the teaching of English with special attention to secondary school teaching. This course is repeatable for credit with advisor approval.

ENGLISH 5520A Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5520B Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5520D Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5522 Medieval Literature Credits: 3

Western religious and secular verse and prose to the 15th century. Late Middle English works are read in the original; all other selections in translation. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5523 Renaissance Literature II Credits: 3

English literature from 1600 to the beginning of the Restoration, including the works of Donne, Jonson, Milton, and other contemporaries. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5526 The Victorian Period Credits: 3

An intensive study of selected writers (such as Arnold, Braddon, the Brontes, the Brownings, Dickens, Darwin, Eliot, Gaskell, Hardy, Ruskin, and the Rossettis) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Victorian period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 5527 Contemporary Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by contemporary poets (post- World War II), such as Auden, Bishop, Hayden, Berryman, Rukeyser, Larkin, Rich, Plath, Heaney, Boland, and Komunyakaa. Students will make in class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographic work.

ENGLISH 5528 20th Century American Literature Credits: 3

Major American writers or literary movements of the 20th century. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5529 Graduate Seminar: Screenwriting Credits: 3

A seminar on advanced theory in narrative screenwriting, script analysis and constructive story editing. Students draft, revise and workshop a short film script or a feature screen play, and deliver a pitch, treatment, draft and revision of the first act and detailed outline of the whole script. Students workshop feature screenplays in small groups.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 429B or COMM-ST 454.

Cross Listings: COMM-ST 354.

ENGLISH 5531 Late 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the mid to late 18th century. Selected writers may include Blake, Burney, Collins, Equiano, Fielding, Gray, Johnson, Sheridan, and Wollstonecraft.

ENGLISH 5532 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction Credits: 3

A course for advanced students of fiction writing. The class will proceed through analysis of models, discussion of general principles, and critique of student work. Students will simultaneously be encouraged to experiment and to refine the form and subjects best suited to their talents. Emphasis will remain on the short story, though there may be units in other forms--novella, film script, the non-fiction essay. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

ENGLISH 5533 Histories Of Writing, Reading, And Publishing Credits: 3

A study of selected topics concerning the material practices of writing, reading, and publishing within specific cultural and historical contexts. Issues examined may include authorship, education, information technologies, libraries, literacy, periodicals, popular literature, publishers, and communities of readers.

ENGLISH 5534 Postcolonial Literature Credits: 3

An exploration of postcolonialism through the study of literary and theoretical texts created by or representing peoples whose historical experience has been decisively shaped by the experience or legacies of colonialism. Texts will be drawn from a variety of genres and from several countries. The course will consider several definitions of postcolonialism and related terms such as cosmopolitanism, hybridity, diaspora, and nationalism.

ENGLISH 5535 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry Credits: 3

An advanced poetry workshop that includes intensive reading of contemporary poetry and aims at each student creating a portfolio of publishable poems. The focus of the course will vary to address a variety of topics such as metaphor and closure; imitation and the line; form and voice. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

ENGLISH 5536 Poetic Forms Credits: 3

An advanced creative writing course that focuses on intensive study of and practice in metrics and traditional and nonce forms. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 315 or equivalent.

ENGLISH 5537 Prose Forms Credits: 3

This course covers techniques for planning and drafting major prose forms. Students will learn how to use content as a guide to inventing new forms (i.e. novella, novel, linked-story collection, episodic novel, essay novel, and creative nonfiction book.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 432WI, ENGLISH 435WI.

ENGLISH 5538 Women's Literature in Africa and the African Diaspora Credits: 3

This course is a comparative examination of the variety of literary works produced by women of African descent in the United States, the Caribbean and Africa. Students will explore the cross-cultural implications of texts in light of the intersections of gender, race and class.

Cross Listings: BLKS 5538.

ENGLISH 5540 American Culture Credits: 3

Texts that offer perspectives on key historical themes of American culture. Texts may be grouped around any culturally significant principle (e.g. region, race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion) or theme (e.g. the mythology of the frontier, marriage and domesticity, the American Dream). Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5541 Girls And Print Culture Credits: 3

This course deals with girls' relationships to the continually evolving print culture. Students will examine various literary representations of girlhood by adult writers, explore texts directed at girls (e.g., conduct books, periodicals, textbooks), and study the writing and reading practices of girls themselves.

ENGLISH 5545 History And Principles Of Rhetoric Credits: 3

A study of selected writings of ancient and modern rhetoricians illustrating key issues in the development of Western discourse theory and practice. Issues examined include the relationships between rhetoric and knowledge, orality and literacy, and rhetoric and poetics. Attention will also be given to the implications of rhetorical theory for modern language instruction. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5546 From Field Shout to Hip Hop: African American Poetic Traditions Credits: 3

This course examines the development of African American poetry from its early forms as field shouts, ballads, and blues to present forms including spoken word and hip hop. Includes authors such as Phillis Wheatley, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Tupac Shakur, and Jessica Care Moore.

ENGLISH 5547 Theory and Criticism in English Studies Credits: 3

A survey of major schools and methods of literary theory and criticism. Authors and texts to be determined by the instructor of the course.

ENGLISH 5548 External Internship Credits: 1-3

Students may complete an external internship involving writing and editing with a publishing company, trade magazine, literary or academic journal, other print or electronic media organization, or with advertising, public relations, or non-profit firms. Internships are granted on a competitive basis. Students will compile a portfolio of their work under the direction of the internship supervisor to be submitted for evaluation to the department’s internship coordinator.

ENGLISH 5549A Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course provides practical experience with New Letters magazine, New Letters on the Air, and BkMk Press in business analysis/reporting, copy-editing, manuscript evaluation, promotion/grant development, library research, market research, and other skills. The practicum is limited to three students per semester, to be chosen on the basis of demonstrated writing and organizational skills. References are required. May be taken for no more than three credit hours over a maximum of two semesters. Permission of the instructors required.

ENGLISH 5549B Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course covers the basics of producing an issue of an academic journal. Students acquire hands-on experience at all stages of production.

ENGLISH 5549C Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course allows students to work with a faculty member on an ad hoc project for publication such as a special journal issue or festschrift, book manuscript, a new scholarly edition of a primary text, or a digital edition. Course may be repeated once for continued work on the same project.

ENGLISH 5550 Graduate Seminar Credits: 3

Authors, works and intellectual currents which form the basis of these seminars may vary from semester to semester, depending upon the instructor's design for the course. May be repeated for credit. Continued in ENGLISH 5555.

ENGLISH 5550A Graduate Seminar Medieval Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550B Graduate Seminar Renaissance Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550C Graduate Seminar Neo-Classical Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550D Graduate Seminar 19th Century Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550E Graduate Seminar American Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550F Graduate Seminar Modern Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550G Graduate Seminar Literary Criticism Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550H Graduate Seminar Studies In Fiction I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550I Graduate Seminar In Dramatic Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550J Graduate Seminar: History Of The English Language Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550K Graduate Seminar: Creative Writing Prose Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550M Graduate Seminar In Rhetoric And Composition Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550MA Greater Kansas City Writing Project: Invitational Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550MC Greater K.C. Writing Project:Writing & The Teaching Of Literature Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550MD Greater Kc Writing Project:Critical Thinking & Process Writing Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550ME Greater K.C. Wrtg Project:Researching The Theories Of Tchng Wrtng Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550N Graduate Seminar: Criticism Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550P Graduate Seminar: Sociolinguistics And Dialectology Credits: 3

Seminar focusing on the role of social factors in language use, and on the origin and development of regional and urban dialects in English. Special attention will be paid to sociolinguistic motivations for change, variation and merger in dialects and languages in contact, and Black English.

ENGLISH 5551 Shakespeare Comedies And Histories Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major comedies and history plays with special emphasis on his dramatic works before 1600. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5552 Early English Drama Credits: 3

English religious and secular drama prior to Shakespeare. Mystery and morality plays are studied with emphasis on their literary and social backgrounds. Close readings of such works as "Everyman," "The Wakefield Second Shepherd's Play," and "The Spanish Tragedy." Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5553 Modern Drama 1880-1945 Credits: 3

A study of modern drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory, and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the earlier modern playwrights from Ibsen to Shaw, with special attention to naturalism. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5554 The Civil Rights Movement in African American Literature Credits: 3

This course examines how African American literature shaped ideas about freedom, rights, citizenship and race in the civil rights movement. It draws on a variety of literary forms-speeches, essays, autobiographies, fiction, drama, poetry and film-to explore the movement's impact on communities and cultures as well as its various debates and competing visions.

ENGLISH 5555 Graduate Seminar Credits: 3

Graduate Seminar - second half.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 5550.

ENGLISH 5555A Graduate Seminar Medieval Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555B Graduate Seminar Renaissance Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555C Graduate Seminar Neo-Classical Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555D Graduate Seminar In 19th-Century Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555E Graduate Seminar American Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555F Graduate Seminar In Modern Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555G Graduate Seminar Literary Criticism Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555H Graduate Seminar Studies In Fiction II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555I Graduate Seminar In Dramatic Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555J Graduate Seminar English Language Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555K Graduate Seminar In Creative Writing:Poetry Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555M Graduate Seminar: Composition Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555N Graduate Seminar: Prose Fiction Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5556 Studies In The Novel 1740-1900 Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major novelists of the eighteenth or nineteenth century. The content of the course will change, depending on the instructor. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5557 Stages toward Freedom: African American Dramatic Traditions Credits: 3

This course explores the development of African American dramatic traditions from the eighteenth century through the Harlem Renaissance, Black Arts Movement, to current postmodernism. Includes authors such as W.W. Brown, Zora N. Hurston, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks.

ENGLISH 5558 Slave Narratives: Race, Gender and Writing Freedom Credits: 3

A truly American, home grown genre and powerful force in the development of American political and social realities, the African American Slave Narrative is an established, recognized influence in the development of African American and American literary history. In this course you will have the opportunity to explore the historical trajectory of the Slave Narrative, looking at early formulations of its structure, purpose and conventions—especially in terms of gender and race, subsequent various permutations, and the eventual development of the Neo-slave Narrative as its resurrection, which adds to the complexity and theoretical impact of the literary autobiography from black perspectives.

ENGLISH 5559 African American Migrations in Literature Credits: 3

The course examines representations of two different trajectories of migration in African American literature: African American journeys from the south to northern and mid-western regions of America, and concurrent migrations of Caribbean people to the US in the early twentieth century.

ENGLISH 5560 Special Topics Credits: 1-4

The professor who gives this course determines what its content shall be. All aspects of English studies are within its possible range.

ENGLISH 5561 Shakespeare:Tragedies And Romances Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major tragedies and late romances with special emphasis on his dramatic literature after 1600. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5562 Restoration And 18th- Century Drama Credits: 3

The drama after the restoration of the monarchy and the reopening of the theatres through the 18th century. Special emphasis is placed on the comedy of manners and the heroic drama in the Restoration and the sentimental comedy in the 18th-century. Includes such playwrights as Dryden, Congreve, Etherege, Wycherley, Steele, Lillo, Cumberland, Sheridan, and Goldsmith. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5563 Contemporary Drama Credits: 3

A study of contemporary drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the more recent writers, including the absurdists, with special attention to experimental drama. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5564 Medieval Methods & Paleography Credits: 3

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of medieval handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will examine the historical and cultural settings for medieval texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textural transmission in the medieval world. In addition to gaining familiarity with the many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal, and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for practical archival work in various European nations.

Prerequisites: First Year Latin.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5583.

ENGLISH 5565 Studies In Modern Novel Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major 20th- century novelists. The content of the course will change depending on the instructor. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5566CA Cluster Course: Images Of The Human Body In The Renaissance Credits: 3

Focusing on Renaissance conceptions of the human body, this cluster treats the following topics as they are reflected in Renaissance literature, art, astrology, astronomy, biology, anatomy, medicine, and politics: A) The dignity of the human body B) Microcosm and macrocosm. C) The human body and the heavens D) Stranger manifestations: freaks and beasts E) The humors F) Disorders of the human body G) The body politic H) The human body as an object of study.

ENGLISH 5566CF Courts And Culture In The Middle Ages Credits: 3

This cluster course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Middle Ages, focusing on medieval cultures in Europe. Arranged around a series of themes, the cluster will read a variety of documentary and literary texts to investigate not only the "high culture" of the courts but also the interactions of people from various social backgrounds in Western Europe.

ENGLISH 5575 Advanced Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction Credits: 3

This course is devoted to the study and crafting of the personal essay. Students will explore - and - practice many different varieties of this diverse form. Whether in the guise of aesthetic appreciation, cultural critique, personal history, political reportage, or travelogue, our course readings are first and foremost PERSONAL narratives, both troubled and enriched by their subjectivity (the essay's ' I '). Students will study the many challenges particular to this form (most of which concern notions of truth, and its rendering) and strive to overcome them as they create vivid personal narratives of their own.

ENGLISH 5582 European Literature: 18th Century Credits: 3

The 18th-century course will focus on a representative sampling from authors such as Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Voltaire, Prevost, La Bruyere, La Rochefoucauld, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau, Schiller, Goethe, and Grimmelshausen. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5591 Research In Selected Fields Credits: 1-3

Individual study under the direction of a senior member of the department, leading to the writing of a formal or scholarly paper. May be repeated for credit.

ENGLISH 5598A MFA Thesis Credits: 3-6

Under the guidance of a graduate MFA faculty member, students completing the MFA must complete and orally defend a publishable or producible manuscript. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit.

ENGLISH 5599 Research And Thesis Credits: 1-9

A student, with permission of the graduate committee, may write a thesis for 3 hours credit.

ENGLISH 5600 Introduction To Doctoral Study In English Credits: 3

Introduction to research skills necessary for doctoral work, particularly for writing the thesis; attention will be paid both to traditional skills such as bibliography and to computer skills.

ENGLISH 5601 Culminating Experience in Literature Credit: 1

Under the guidance of a graduate faculty member in English, students following the program of study in Literature must revise and orally defend a 20-30 page paper in Literature on a pass/no pass basis.

ENGLISH 5602 Culminating Experience in Language & Literature Credit: 1

Under the Guidance of a graduate faculty member in English, Students following the program of study in Language & Literature must revise and orally defend a 20-30 page paper in Language & Literature on a pass/no pass basis.

ENGLISH 5603 Culminating Experience in Manuscript, Print Culture, & Editing. Credit: 1

Under the guidance of a graduate faculty member in English, students following the program of Study in Manuscript, Print Culture, and Editing must revise and orally defend a 20-30 page paper in Manuscript, Print Culture, and Editing on a pass/no pass basis.

ENGLISH 5650 Doctoral Seminar Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5691 Doctoral Research In Selected Fields Credits: 3

Individual study under the direction of a senior member of the department leading to the writing of a formal or scholarly paper. May be repeated for credit.

ENGLISH 5699 Research And Dissertation Credits: 1-15

Research and preparation for the doctoral dissertation.

ENGLISH 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1