Department of Sociology

Haag Hall, Room 208
5120 Rockhill Road
(816) 235-1116
Fax: (816) 235-1117

http://cas.umkc.edu/sociology

Mailing Address
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Department of Sociology
Haag Hall, Room 208
5120 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110-2499

Department Chair:
Shannon Jackson

Professors:
Jennifer Huberman, Shannon Jackson (Coordinator, Anthropology Program), Deborah B. Smith

Associate Professors:
Jeffrey S. Bennett, Marc Garcelon (Coordinator, Sociology Program), Sookhee Oh, Theresa Torres

Assistant Professor:
Michelle Smirnova (Principal Graduate Advisor), Joseph Workman

Associate Teaching Professor:
Ann Marie Wood

Administrative Assistant:
Nathan Milburn

Professors Emeriti:
Linda Breytspraak, Miguel Carranza, Thomas Carroll, Burton Halpert, Philip G. Olson, Peter Singelmann

Department Description

The Department of Sociology offers programs of study leading to:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Sociology - two emphasis options:
    • General Sociology
    • Cultural Anthropology Emphasis

Program minors are available in:

  • Sociology
  • Anthropology

Sociology is a wide-ranging discipline that strives to understand how the organization of society affects people’s lives and experiences. Our mission is to help students develop a sociological perspective and use this perspective to question and understand the world around them. Students in our program have opportunities to develop critical thinking and research skills and to apply classroom learning through experiences in community organizations and agencies. Department faculty members are committed to excellence in teaching and work to assist students in developing a foundation for moving into a career.

Department Activities

Academic Advising

Student academic advising is a continuous process in the department. Undergraduate advisors are available for consultation throughout the academic year. The department recommends that students check the program requirements in the department office before filing the Declaration of Major form. Undergraduate majors are encouraged to consult with the department to establish a tentative plan of study and to meet with a department advisor each semester. Students should leave their mail and email addresses with the department office so they can receive notifications concerning the class time table, new classes, and other departmental information of interest to majors.

Financial Assistance

Students can receive financial assistance through various campus scholarships, loan programs, grants and the work-study program. Students who are interested should contact the Financial Aid and Scholarships Office.

Sociology/Anthropology Club and Sociology Honor Society

The Sociology Club is open to all students majoring in Sociology as well as students who are interested in this field but have not yet declared a major. Club activities include service projects in the community, sponsorship of community speakers on campus, participation in local and regional professional meetings, and learning about internships and research opportunities. The department has a chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta, a national honorary society for Sociology students.

Undergraduate Student Award

A special award was established as a memorial to Edward Tomich, Ph.D., professor of Sociology from 1964 to 1976. Students must submit an application to the department to be considered for the award. On the recommendation of the department faculty, the Edward Tomich Award is given annually to a senior student majoring in Sociology who exemplifies an indomitable spirit; a commitment to the struggle for human welfare; an unquenchable thirst for knowledge and personal growth; an unwillingness to be cowed by authority or the superficialities of status; a readiness to ask the more difficult questions while being ready to accept the uncertainty of answers; and an appreciation of the value of theoretical knowledge about human interaction in everyday life. 

Cooperative Programs

The department cooperates with other programs frequently by jointly listing courses at the undergraduate level. Students may benefit from combining one of these areas of study with their major in sociology: 

  • Black Studies
  • Family Studies
  • Gerontology
  • Honors
  • Latina/Latino Studies
  • Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Desirable Preparation for Undergraduate Admission Requirements

High school students are encouraged to take a general college preparatory curriculum. Additional courses in mathematics, English, foreign languages and the social sciences, such as economics, anthropology, psychology and sociology are recommended. Students planning to transfer from a community college are encouraged to take at least 6 credit hours of sociology (including introductory sociology), and college algebra. A maximum of 12 hours of transfer credits, including introductory sociology, can be counted toward satisfaction of the major field requirements.

Anthropology Courses

ANTHRO 103 Introduction To Cultural Anthropology Credits: 3

An introduction to culture and the basic concepts of anthropology. Topics include kinship, language, and cultural change.


ANTHRO 103 - MOTR ANTH 201: Cultural Anthropology
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ANTHRO 300 Special Topics in Anthropology Credits: 1-3

Each time this course is offered, a different area of anthropology, to be announced, will be examined.

ANTHRO 302 Social Stratification Credits: 3

The distribution of power, privileges and prestige are examined in a historical and comparative perspective. The process whereby distribution systems develop, become institutionalized, and become transformed are analyzed.

ANTHRO 305 Language and Culture Credits: 3

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic objects, aims, and methods of linguistic anthropology. Students will acquire this familiarity by studying both theoretical and ethnographic articles that focus on some of the major areas of concern within the field including: the evolution of human language, linguistic particularity and universality, the relationship of language to thought, structuralism and semiotics, trope theory, language and emotion, sociolinguistics, the development of writing systems, and language conservation and change.

ANTHRO 306 Culture, Emotion, and Identity Credits: 3

This course introduces students to some of the key theoretical perspectives and debates within the field of psychological anthropology. By drawing upon cross-cultural studies of emotion, personhood, sexuality, illness, and consciousness it seeks to understand some of the ways that culture and society influence human psychology and experience.

ANTHRO 308 The Social Life of Things Credits: 3

This course examines the connections between people and things. It explores how social relationships are created and changed through the use and exchange of objects, and how objects themselves take on particular meanings and values in these processes.

ANTHRO 322 Race And Ethnic Relations Credits: 3

The nature, origin and dynamics of ethnic and race relations in the U. S. and other societies. Specific attention will be given to the historical and contemporary contexts of prejudice, discrimination and confrontation.

ANTHRO 326 Consumer Society Credits: 3

This course explores the emergence of Consumer Society as both a sociohistorical development and as an object of social scientific inquiry. Students will explore how the study of Consumer Society has been animated by different scholarly questions, debates, and analytic approaches.

ANTHRO 328 Body and Society Credits: 3

Body and Society is an interdisciplinary and comparative approach to the study of the body as the subject and object of social processes. Interdisciplinary approaches to topics such as meaning, ritual, performance, and practice will provide a framework for classical as well as contemporary explorations of bodily representation and experiences across a variety of cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: ANTHRO 103.

ANTHRO 331 Urban Anthropology Credits: 3

A course designed to apply anthropological methods to the study of various urban environments. The approach to the subject is comparative, seeking to spell out those features of the urban setting which vary from culture to culture as well as those which are common to all.

ANTHRO 348 Latinx Immigrants, Migrants, and Refugees in the U.S. Credits: 3

This course addresses the culture of societies of U.S. citizens, immigrants, and refugees of Latin American heritage living in the U.S. The course emphasizes recent anthropological, historical, cultural, and sociological studies.

ANTHRO 358 Culture and Society Credits: 3

This course examines the "culture concept" at the heart of the contending theories of society, which is used to describe a society or way of life, a whole social order, or particular aesthetic styles and objects. The course links these various topics together in a concluding section on culture in the age of the Internet and globalization.

ANTHRO 359 Media and Society Credits: 3

This course examines the rise, development, and change of mass media in American society from broadsheets and news flyers through contemporary media formats.

ANTHRO 373 Anthropology of Religion Credits: 3

This course explores the ways anthropologist have gone about studying religion from the opening decades of the 20th century to present. The course introduces students to the diversity of human religious expression and experience through anthropological literature and to the diversity of anthropological expression especially as it has been revealed in social scientific studies of religious life. The course is designed to generate a critical dialogue about the special role that religion has played in the ongoing anthropological engagement with "other" societies and cultures over time.

ANTHRO 380 Technology and Society Credits: 3

This course will help students explore the ways technology shapes and is shaped by human interaction. Students will read interdisciplinary literature that builds theoretical and interpretive frameworks around classical and contemporary case studies. A fundamental question to be addressed throughout the course: how does the comparative study of technology help us understand what it means to be human?

ANTHRO 397 Independent Readings in Anthropology Credits: 1-3

Intensive readings in an area selected by the student with prior consultation with instructor.

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of anthropology.

ANTHRO 407 Writing Culture: The Craft of Ethnography Credits: 3

This course will explore the ways anthropologists document and write about cultural practices, processes, and beliefs. Students will become familiar with debates about representation while they consider differences in the ways ethnographic writing rhetorically conveys culture. Students will also compare ethnographic methods, theories, and styles of writing as these have changed over time.

ANTHRO 441 Globalization and Development Credits: 3

Focuses on issues of economic development, social stratification, political institutions, and political mobilization in societies where colonialism provided the context for their long-term disadvantages in the international economic order. Specific attention is paid to the intersection of the international components that define the options and limits for societal development (e.g., market shifts, international institutions and contracts, foreign policies, and migration) and the distinct social, political and cultural implications of these factors for developing societies.

Sociology Courses

SOCIOL 101 Sociology: An Introduction Credits: 3

An introduction to the study of society and the basic concepts of sociology.


SOCIOL 101 - MOTR SOCI 101: General Sociology
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

SOCIOL 201 Introduction To Social Psychology Credits: 3

Exploration of the relationships between human behavior and social context. The course focuses on how realities are socially constructed and sustained, the role of symbol systems, definitions of the situation, the self as a product of interaction, and the relationship between language, thought and culture.

SOCIOL 203 Social Problems Credits: 3

An examination of major social problems of modern Western society, including issues of racial conflict, war, civil rights, youth movements, the mass media, urban poverty, and crime. The topics will vary from year to year depending upon the instructor.

SOCIOL 211 Social And Psychological Development Through The Life Cycle Credits: 3

A survey of significant psychosocial issues, events and crises throughout the human life span. The life cycle of the family is examined as the primary context within which individual development occurs. Although the primary emphasis will be on normal adjustment and development, attention will also be given to the occurrence of special problems and deviations at each life stage.

SOCIOL 300 Special Topics in Sociology Credits: 1-3

Each time this course is offered, a different area of sociology, to be announced, will be given. On demand.

SOCIOL 300A Special Topics In Sociology Credits: 1-3

Each time this course is offered, a different area of sociology, to be announced, will be given.

SOCIOL 302 Social Stratification Credits: 3

The distribution of power, privileges and prestige are examined in a historical and comparative perspective. The process whereby distribution systems develop, become institutionalized, and become transformed are analyzed.

SOCIOL 306 Culture, Emotion, and Identity Credits: 3

This course introduces students to some of the key theoretical perspectives and debates within the field of psychological anthropology. By drawing upon cross-cultural studies of emotion, personhood, sexuality, illness, and consciousness it seeks to understand some of the ways that culture and society influence human psychology and experience.

SOCIOL 310R Families And The Life Course Credits: 3

This course is an upper level introduction examining the sociological, historical, and social psychological research on the family, focusing primarily on the United States. The course examines families of varied ethnicity, as well as family compositions at different stages of the life course. Emphasis is placed on the interdependence of family members, as well as how society and policy influence the family.

SOCIOL 313R Sociology Of Gender Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender in contemporary U.S. society. Special attention is directed to how gender is experienced inter-sectionally with other social categories, including social class, race, sexuality, and age.

SOCIOL 316 Sociology Of Death And Dying Credits: 3

Examination of attitudes, behaviors and institutions related to death and dying in contemporary American society. Topics include the status of death in American society, effects of the setting on dying, interaction with the dying, funeral practices, bereavement customs, surviving spouse, and suicide.

SOCIOL 317 Policies Of Drug Use And Control Credits: 3

Utilizing both historical and contemporary information, this course provided an assessment of the "drug problem" in the U.S. and policies of control developed in response to the problem. Drug use criminalization, legalization, medical treatment and prevention strategies and related issues are considered in regard to scientific knowledge related to the patterns, causes and impact of substance abuse.

SOCIOL 320 Social Deviance Credits: 3

The dominant sociological perspectives on deviance will be discussed with special attention given to the processes that define behavior and persons as deviant and the impact of such definitions on social relationships and identity.

SOCIOL 322 Race And Ethnic Relations Credits: 3

The nature, origin and dynamics of ethnic and race relations in the U. S. and other societies. Specific attention will be given to the historical and contemporary contexts of prejudice discrimination and confrontation.

SOCIOL 326 Consumer Society Credits: 3

This course explores the emergence of Consumer Society as both a sociohistorical development and as an object of social scientific inquiry. Students will explore how the study of Consumer Society has been animated by different scholarly questions, debates, and analytic approaches.

SOCIOL 328 Body and Society Credits: 3

Body and Society is an interdisciplinary and comparative approach to the study of the body as the subject and object of social processes. Interdisciplinary approaches to topics such as meaning, ritual, performance, and practice will provide a framework for classical as well as contemporary explorations of bodily representation and experiences across a variety of cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: ANTHRO 103.

SOCIOL 332 Sociology Of Political Life Credits: 3

The concept of power, community power structure and decision making. The social basis of liberal democracy; consensus and legitimacy; political stability and instability. Power and politics in a mass society; elites and masses; democracy and oligarchy; alienation; bureaucracy; pluralism and totalitarianism. Ideology and social movements.

SOCIOL 337 Community Development In Urban America Credits: 3

The focus in this course is on experiential learning in which the student participates in several urban community development projects that allow for learning about collaboratives, networking, problem-solving, and requisite skills to successfully manage a project. Principles of community development are presented to give the student background for understanding the projects visited.

SOCIOL 348 Latinx Immigrants, Migrants, and Refugees in the U.S Credits: 3

This course addresses the culture of societies of U.S. citizens, immigrants, and refugees of Latin American heritage living in the U.S. The course emphasizes recent anthropological, historical, cultural, and sociological studies.

SOCIOL 357 Social Movements Credits: 3

This course focuses on the link between social movements and political change in the modern world. Social movements arise outside official channels and against established political orders. Students will develop an understanding of the relation between social mobilization and institutional change in various countries, especially in the United States.

SOCIOL 358 Culture and Society Credits: 3

This course examines the "culture concept" at the heart of the contending theories of society, which is used to describe a society or way of life, a whole social order, or particular aesthetic styles and objects. The course links these various topics together in a concluding section on culture in the age of the Internet and globalization.

SOCIOL 359 Media and Society Credits: 3

This course examines the rise, development and change of mass media in American society from broadsheets and news flyers through contemporary media formats.

SOCIOL 361 Social Theory Credits: 3

A survey of the major orientations in social theory, their historical development, and contemporary issues and controversies in social theory. Recommended preparation: A course in social science.

SOCIOL 362 Methods Of Sociological Research Credits: 3

Experimental and observational schemes; survey analysis; interview and questionnaire designs; scaling techniques; sampling. Recommended preparation: A course in Social Science.

SOCIOL 363 Introduction to Statistics in Sociology/Criminal Justice Credits: 3

A first course in the statistical analysis of quantitative data. Course emphasizes descriptive statistics, probability theory, parameter estimation, bivariate hypothesis testing, and computer applications.

Prerequisites: MATH 110 or MATH 116, or STAT 115 or MOTRMATH 110 or higher level math (with a grade of C- or higher); or ALEKS Score of 61 or higher.

SOCIOL 366 The Living Dead Credits: 3

This course investigates the variety of ways human beings construe and configure relationships between the living and the dead.

SOCIOL 380 Technology and Society Credits: 3

This course will help students explore the ways technology shapes and is shaped by human interaction. Students will read interdisciplinary literature that builds theoretical and interpretive frameworks around classical and contemporary case studies. A fundamental question to be addressed throughout the course: how does the comparative study of technology help us understand what it means to be human?

SOCIOL 390R Directed Field Experience I Credits: 1-6

The student will work within one or more social agencies or organizations in the city under the joint supervision of a professional within the organization and a member of the Sociology Department. In-class discussion will cover the major problems of social organization.

SOCIOL 391 Directed Field Experience II Credits: 1-6

A continuation of SOCIOL 390R.

SOCIOL 397 Independent Readings In Sociology Credits: 1-3

Intensive readings in an area selected by the student with prior consultation with instructor. Recommended preparation: Twelve hours of sociology coursework.

SOCIOL 398 Independent Research In Sociology Credits: 1-6

Intensive research in an area selected by the student with prior consultation with instructor.

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of sociology.

SOCIOL 404WI The Sociology Capstone: Senior Seminar Credits: 3

This seminar explores the interrelationships between sociology theory, research methods, and statistics. It may focus on major contemporary issues building on and integrating knowledge obtained in previous courses. Recommended preparation: SOCIOL 362.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 363.

SOCIOL 410R Aging In Contemporary Society Credits: 3

Attitudes and stereotypes, the status of the aged in American society; the social psychology of the aging process; the response of societal institutions such as the family and political system to the aging of the population as a whole. Applications and potentials of research are considered.

SOCIOL 411 Sociology Of Human Sexuality Credits: 3

A cross cultural examination of the most fundamental dichotomy in human society: male and female. Considering sex both as a biological and social category, this course compares diversity and similarity in the interrelationships of male and female in patterns of behavior and social organization found in human societies across time and space.

SOCIOL 418 Feminist Theories Credits: 3

This class introduces the major feminist theories and their primary authors over the last 200 years. The class takes both a historical view (beginning with two millenia of male-centered theories about women) and a conceptual approach (theories are grouped by common ground) and familiarizes the student with both the historical processes that necessitate feminist theories as well as with the breadth and depth of the historically and currently available scholarship.

Prerequisites: WGS 201.

SOCIOL 431 Social Organization Of The City Credits: 3

An examination of the social structure of the American city with special reference to the historical development of American cities. Attention will be focused on the role of social institutions as they have changed in relation to urban problems.

SOCIOL 433 Immigration and the City Credits: 3

This course examines key issues and controversies in immigration research. Special attention will be paid to the social, economic, and historical developments of urban immigrant communities.

SOCIOL 434 Spatial Thinking in Social Science Credits: 3

This course will review ways in which social scientists have incorporated the concepts of space, place, and distance into their theories and research. Readings will be drawn from interdisciplinary work in the areas of urban sociology, criminology, health and demography that deal with spatial organization of communities and cities, spatial disparity of health and crimes, and mobility.

Prerequisites: junior, senior, or graduate standing.

SOCIOL 440R Sociology Of Medicine Credits: 3

Relationship of basic concepts in sociology to health and medical care. Cultural and class variations in health status. Social and cultural aspects of health. Recommended preparation: A course in social science.

SOCIOL 441 Globalization and Development Credits: 3

Focuses on issues of economic development, social stratification, political institutions, and political mobilization in societies where colonialism provided the context for their long-term disadvantages in the international economic order. Specific attention is paid to the intersection of the international components that define the options and limits for societal development (e.g., market shifts, international institutions and contracts, foreign policies, and migration) and the distinct social, political and cultural implications of these factors for developing societies.

SOCIOL 5501 Social Theory I Credits: 3

Examines the development of social theory in Europe up to the beginning of the twentieth century, with a focus on its intellectual precursors of social theory, debates over the nature of society, and controversies over the distinct features of sociology as an emerging academic discipline. The major perspectives covered include the intellectual origins of sociological thought in Great Britain, France, and Germany, and the debates as reflected in the writings of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmel.

Prerequisites: undergraduate course in Sociological Theory.

SOCIOL 5502 Social Theory II Credits: 3

Examines the major sociological theories developed during the twentieth century and contemporary debates over the nature of society and the nature of our knowledge about society. Theories to be examined include behaviorism, symbolic interactionism, structural functionalism, phenomenology, conflict theory, postmodernism, those that attempt to integrate social agency and structure, and feminist theory.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 5501.

SOCIOL 5503 Controversies In Contemporary Social Theory And Practice Credits: 3

This course critically examines central issues in contemporary debates among social theorists over the nature of society and how it should be studied.

SOCIOL 5510 Sociological Methods I Credits: 3

A survey of methods used by sociologists: selection and formulation of problem, research design, survey research, participant observation, sampling, reliability and validity, use of scales, and data analysis.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 362.

SOCIOL 5511 Sociological Methods II Credits: 3

Quantitative research is the primary focus of the course; emphasis is placed on problem formulation; research design; sampling procedures; questionnaire construction and interviewing techniques; data collection; problems of scaling, validity and reliability; uses of secondary data sets; data analyses and report writing.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 362.

SOCIOL 5516 Intermediate Statistics Credits: 3

A systematic development of the logic and practice of selected statistical methods used in sociological research. Included are analysis of variance and covariance, regression analysis, multiple contingency, and non-parametric tests.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 363 or CJC 303.

SOCIOL 5530 Anthropology Of Gender Credits: 3

This class explores theories of the social construction of gender in cross-cultural contexts. It will also explore global issues of diversity, local and international politics, the economy and work, education, etc.

SOCIOL 5531 Feminist Theories Credits: 3

This class introduces the major feminist theories and their primary authors over the last 200 years. The class takes both an historical (we begin with two millennia of male-centered theories about women) and a conceptual approach (theories are grouped by common ground) and familiarizes the student with both the historical processes that necessitate feminist theories as well as with the breadth of the historically and currently available scholarship. Graduate students are expected to fulfill all undergraduate requirements at graduate-level quality, including independent research components; in addition, graduate students are required to be prepared to lead class discussions.

Prerequisites: WGS 201.

SOCIOL 5534 Spatial Thinking in Social Science Credits: 3

This course will review ways in which social scientists have incorporated the concepts of space, place, and distance into their theories and research. Readings will be drawn from interdisciplinary work in the areas of urban sociology, criminology, health and demography that deal with spatial organization of communities and cities, spatial disparity of health and crimes, and mobility.Generic computer file management skills are required and knowledge of research methods is desirable.

SOCIOL 5537 Anthropology of Religion Credits: 3

This course explores the ways anthropologists have gone about studying religion from the opening decades of the 20th century to present. The course introduces students to the diversity of human religious expression and experience through anthropological literature and to the diversity of anthropological expression especially as it has been revealed in social scientific studies of religious life. The course is designed to generate a critical dialogue about the special role that religion has played in the ongoing anthropological engagement with "other" societies and cultures over time.

SOCIOL 5538 Gender, Work And Social Change Credits: 3

This course examines the role of gendered work and consumption in global social change. Drawing from sociological perspectives on gender and work, this course foregrounds a global comparative analysis of societal development and working contexts, including tourism employment, sex work, domestic work, and agricultural, garment, and informatics production. Graduate students are required to carry out independent research or complete work in the area of public sociology and academic-service learning. Students will write a conference paper or journal quality article from this research.

SOCIOL 5540 Urban Social Structure Credits: 3

An examination of the social structure of the American city with special reference to the historical development of American cities. Attention will be focused on the role of social institutions as they have changed in relation to urban problems.

SOCIOL 5550 Sociology Of Aging Credits: 3

A seminar in which theoretical orientations, methodologies, and findings from crosscultural and community research in gerontology are systematically reviewed, within a social change framework.

SOCIOL 5554 Sociology Of The Aging Woman Credits: 3

An exploration of the intersection of gender and aging issues with special attention to cultural images of women, the development of self-concept and identity in mid-life and beyond, caring roles in the family, work and retirement, and health and mental health issues. These issues are examined within the context of social class, race, and ethnicity. Implications for community programs and social policy are considered. Graduate students will be expected to carry out a research project and to lead a class session.

SOCIOL 5556 Aging And Developmental Disabilities Credits: 2

This course explores the experience of aging with a developmental disability or mental retardation within the context or normative aging. Among the comparisons made between older persons with and without developmental disabilities are their demographic characteristics, physical and cognitive functioning, role transitions and losses, identities and self-concepts, and family and caregiving issues. Policies, programs, and emerging concepts of best practices are considered within the context of quality of life, ethical, and community inclusion bases.

SOCIOL 5557 Practicum In Aging And Developmental Disabilities Credit: 1

Students gain experience in working with and defining issues of older persons with developmental disabilities through placements in sheltered workshops, senior centers, residential group homes, and other community-based programs.

Co-requisites: SOCIOL 5556.

SOCIOL 5560 Sociology Of Death And Dying Credits: 3

This course examines attitudes, behaviors, and institutions related to death and dying in contemporary American society. Topics include the meanings of death in American society, social settings for dying, interaction with the dying, customs and practices surrounding death, role transitions of survivors, and suicide. Special attention is given to issues of aging and dying.

SOCIOL 5573 Latin American Immigrants and Refugees in the U.S. Credits: 3

This course is the study of history, culture and societies of immigrants and US citizens of Latin American heritage living in the U.S.

SOCIOL 5580 Special Studies In Sociology Credits: 1-3

An opportunity to explore in depth topics not included in usual course offerings. One or more topics will be announced in advance of registration.

SOCIOL 5595 Directed Research Experience Credits: 3

Research project supervised by faculty.

SOCIOL 5597 Independent Readings Credits: 1-3

Intensive readings in an area selected by the student with prior consultation with the instructor.

SOCIOL 5599 Thesis And Research Credits: 1-6

Directed specialized research. Before writing a thesis, the student must clear the topic and research design with the Supervisory Committee. The course also involves the writing of the thesis.

SOCIOL 5699 Dissertation Research Credits: 1-12

Individual directed research leading to preparation and completion of doctoral dissertation.

SOCIOL 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1