5301 Rockhill Road
816- 235-1233
816-235-5437 (fax)
http://www.umkc.edu/ali

Program Description

The Applied Language Institute (ALI) is a joint program of UMKC and The Metropolitan Community College (MCC). The Institute’s mission is to offer comprehensive English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction for academic, personal or professional purposes as well as language acquisition and cross-cultural classes and seminars. In addition, the Institute aims to provide students with an understanding of U.S. culture and values, particularly within the educational environment, while acknowledging and valuing students' own cultures and languages.

Our intensive ESL program offers up to 27 hours of instruction per week in Listening/Speaking, Reading/Vocabulary, Grammar, Writing, U.S. Culture, and Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) Preparation. Classes are small and offered at all levels of instruction from beginning through advanced. In addition, students have access to a multimedia language resource center. Our teaching and administrative staff is friendly, supportive, and understanding of the needs of international students in the United States.

Regular programs run from late August through December (Fall), January through May (Spring), and June and July (Summer). Additionally, the ALI offers a variety of specialized short-term and group programs that include language and cultural/academic education.

English Proficiency Requirement

Proficiency in English is essential to success in academic programs at UMKC. The ALI’s role at UMKC is to ensure that all non-native English speakers either already have, or have an opportunity to acquire these necessary skills. Prior to enrollment, newly-admitted ALI students, and international academically-admitted students who have a TOEFL score below 100, or an IELTS score below 6.5 are required to take the English Evaluation Examination administered by the ALI. Based on results of the English Evaluation Examination, students must enroll in and successfully complete the ALI coursework indicated as necessary. For academic students, coursework is determined by the ALI in consultation with the student's academic unit.

The only international students exempted from this admissions policy are:

  • Native English speakers from English-speaking countries such as Canada, England, the Republic of Ireland, Australia and New Zealand.
  • Non-native English speakers who hold degrees or diplomas from post-secondary institutions in English-speaking countries (such as the United States, Canada, England, the Republic of Ireland, Australia and New Zealand), provided that they have spent a minimum of two years of successful full-time study and English was the medium of instruction.

Grades and GPA

All ALI coursework is graded according to UMKC policies and is used in the calculation of a student’s grade point average (GPA).

  • Academic Probation and Ineligibility
    • Academic status is assessed at the end of every term, whether the student is full time or part time for that term.
    • A summer session is considered the same as a semester for the purpose of determining academic actions.
    • Students are notified of academic actions via their UMKC e-mail address.
    • Students will be placed on academic probation if their GPA falls below 2.0.
    • Once students are placed on academic probation, they have two semesters to raise their cumulative GPA to the level required (2.0 for undergraduate students, 3.0 for graduate students).
    • During those two semesters, students term GPA must be at least 2.0 for undergraduate students and 3.0 for graduate students to be allowed to continue. (Note: some academic units may have higher GPA requirements.)
    • Students who fail to meet the criteria as stated above will be ineligible to re-enroll without permission of the College of Arts and Sciences Academic Standards Committee
  • Credit/Non-Credit
    • ALI students registered as pass/fail, who fail two or more courses during an academic term, will be placed on academic probation.
    • Students who are placed on academic probation must not fail one or more courses per semester during the following two academic semesters.
    • Students who fail to meet the criteria as stated above will be ineligible to re-enroll without permission of the College of Arts and Sciences Academic Standards Committee.

Tammy Adams; lecturer; B.A. (University of the Pacific, CA); M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City)

Juanita Blackton; adjunct instructor; B.B.A (Eastern Michigan University); MA (University of Central Missouri)

Chelsey Butts; adjunct instructor; B.A. (Tulane University); M.S.E., M.A. (University of Kansas)

Kathryn DeBenedetti; lecturer; B.A. (Southern Oregon University); M.A. (Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent, England)

Shelby Estelle; adjunct instructor; B.S. (University of Nebraska); M.A. (University of Central Missouri)

Deborah Garza; adjunct instructor; B.A., M.A. (University of Kansas)

Talyn Good; lecturer; B.A. (University of Missouri); M.A. (University of Kansas)

Stephen Holland-Wempe; ESL specialist; B.A. (Rockhurst University); M.A. (School for International Training)

Joseph (Clint) Hughes; lecturer; B.A. (Southwest Missouri State University)

Emily Kirklin; adjunct instructor; B.A. (Michigan Technology University); M.A.T. (University of Southern California)

Alma (Estelle) Manning; adjunct instructor; B.A., M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City)

Michael Meeder; adjunct instructor; B.A. (Sarah Lawrence College); M.A. (Arizona State University)

Monica Mingucci; director; B.A. (University of São Paulo); M.A. (Central Missouri State University); PhD (University of Missouri-Kansas City)

Patrick Mitchell; lecturer; B.A. (Rockhurst University); M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City)

Janine O’Shea; lecturer; B.A. (University of Kansas); M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City); M.B.A. (Rockhurst University)

Fiorillo (Phil) Ruggiero; lecturer; B.A. (Queens College); M.A. (University of Kansas)

Samantha Sagastume; lecturer; B.A. (Northwest Missouri State University); M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City)

Charles Sailors; adjunct instructor; B.A. (Southern Nazarene University); M.A. (Nazarene Theological Seminary)

Adam Shoemaker; associate director; B.A. (Rockhurst University); M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City)

Michael Turner; lecturer; B.A. (Truman State University); M.A. (University of Oregon)

Deirdre Wood; adjunct instructor; B.A. (Drake University); M.A. (New York University)

ENGLISH 100B     Basic Speaking and Listening For Non-Native Speakers     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of speaking and listening for survival-level social functions in English. Frequent exercises focus on the production of isolated words and phrases in areas of need, and on the development of survival level oral/aural skills for beginning ESL students. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100C     Basic Reading for Non-Native Speakers     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of survival-level reading English vocabulary in context. Frequent exercises focus on basic reading comprehension related to familiar topics and situations, and the introduction of dictionary skills. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100D     Basic Writing For Non-Native Speakers     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of survival level writing skills including spelling, capitalization and some punctuation. Introduction of basic sentence structures and completion of simple standard forms of written English. Frequent exercises focus on survival level writing such as words and basic phrases in the present tense. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100G     Basic Grammar For Non-Native Speakers     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of survival level sentence structures and words. Frequent exercises focus on basic level sentences, questions, directions, and descriptions in the present tense that relate to students' immediate surroundings and some life skills areas. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100S     Special Topics In English As A Second Language     Credits: 1-6
A course designed to address the specific needs of an individual student or group of students studying English as a Second Language. In addition to targeting English skills, the course may address topics or skills which are not covered in the standard Academic English curriculum of the Applied Language Institute. This course will accommodate individual students or groups of students studying at the Institute for periods of time other than the standard semester length. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100T     TOEFL Preparation     Credits: 1-3
This course will prepare students to take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), in either the paper-based (PBT) or internet-based (iBT) form, and/or to improve their scores from previous attempts. Exercises focus on developing the skills and strategies necessary for navigating TOEFL questions while continuing to develop the general English language skills that support success on the TOEFL. The course will provide students with a personal awareness of strengths and weaknesses so they may focus their test preparation work in and outside of class. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101B     Academic Speaking & Listening For Non-Native Speakers I     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of speaking and listening for basic social functions in English. Exercises include the practice of basic descriptions and the development of oral/aural skills for beginning ESL students. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101C     Academic Reading & Vocabulary For Non-Native Speakers I     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of reading with basic English vocabulary in context. Exercises focus on reading comprehension, identifying the topics of short readings, and the introduction of basic dictionary skills. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101D     Academic Writing For Non-Native Speakers I     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of basic writing skills including handwriting, spelling, capitalization and punctuation. Frequent short exercises emphasize basic sentence structure, biographical description, and completion of standard forms. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101G     Academic Grammar For Non-Native Speakers I     Credits: 1-3
The study and practical application of basic sentence structure and word parts. Frequent exercises emphasize use and understanding of simple sentences, questions, directions, and descriptions in the present and past tenses. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 102B     Academic Speaking & Listening For Non-Native Speakers II     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of speech in environments such as the classroom, work, and simple social occasions. Exercises focus on student's ability to distinguish sounds and to produce them correctly in the context of a sentence and to listen for specific information. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 102C     Academic Reading & Vocabulary For Non-Native Speakers II     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of reading narrative and expository texts and standard forms. Exercises focus on the development of vocabulary and introduction of reading techniques such as identification of topics and main ideas, skimming, scanning, prediction, and inference. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Science.

ENGLISH 102D     Academic Writing For Non-Native Speakers II     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of techniques for writing short paragraphs in English. Frequent exercises emphasize various forms of paragraph organization and the improvement of punctuation and mechanical skills in writing. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 102G     Academic Grammar For Non-Native Speakers II     Credits: 1-3
The study and practical application of basic sentence structures, including future and irregular past tense constructions. Frequent exercises emphasize use and understanding of comparatives, questions, and compound nouns and verbs. This course carried no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103B     Academic Speaking & Listening For Non-Native Speakers III     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of listening for and producing speech in the past, present and future tenses. Exercises introduce note-taking techniques and focus on the ability to hear and express abstract ideas. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103C     Academic Reading & Vocabulary For Non-Native Speakers III     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of longer reading passages of various rhetorical styles. Exercises focus on improvement of reading speed and the development of vocabulary and comprehension through complex inferences. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103D     Academic Writing For Non-Native Speakers III     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of writing multi-paragraph academic essays. Frequent exercises emphasize point-of-view, process writing, and a variety of rhetorical styles. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103G     Academic Grammar For Non-Native Speakers III     Credits: 1-3
The study and practical application of complex sentence structures, including perfect and perfect progressive tenses. Frequent exercises emphasize use and understanding of passive voice, gerunds and infinitives, articles, conditionals, and modals. The course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 104B     Academic Speaking & Listening For Non-Native Speakers IV     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of standard English, particularly in the college classroom. Exercises include training in academic lecture comprehension and note-taking as well as formal (classroom presentation) and informal (conversation) English speaking. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 104C     Advanced Academic English Reading For Non-Native Speakers IV     Credits: 1-3
This course focuses on preparing students to deal effectively with sophisticated academic reading materials by guiding them in the development of a conscious and reflective approach toward reading. It emphasizes advanced reading skills of interpretation, inference, critical analysis, evaluation and application. There will be frequent exercises addressing the acquisition and practice of study skills and collaborative academic work.
Prerequisites: Completion of ENGLISH 103C with a grade of B or better.

ENGLISH 104D     Academic Writing For Non-Native Speakers IV     Credits: 1-3
The study and practice of rhetorical principles in standard English prose. Frequent writing exercises emphasize critical thinking and research skills as well as fluency and accuracy in academic writing. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 104G     Advanced Academic English Grammar For Non-Native Speakers IV     Credits: 1-3
This course focuses on the analytical understanding and application of English grammar. Students will be expected to observe usage patterns of the English language in a combination of both normative and prescriptive grammars appropriate for academic English application. There will be frequent exercises emphasizing mastery of complex grammar structures including all verb tenses, dependent clauses, modals, and unreal conditionals, and of the relationship between ideas and the construction of sentences in academic discourse.
Prerequisites: Completion of ENGLISH 103G with a grade of B or better.

ENGLISH 105A     Advanced Academic English (Multiskills) For Non-Native Speakers V     Credits: 1-3
The comprehensive study and practice of standard English skills for advanced students of English as a second language. level readings focusing on current issues serve as the basis for frequent writing exercises and for classroom discussions and presentations. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 105B     Advance Speaking and Listening Topics for Non-Native Speakers     Credits: 1-3
This course focuses on developing high-level fluency in English listening and speaking through critical awareness of social language use. Students will work toward greater speaking and listening fluency and adaptability through the practice of skills involving purpose, audience, speech norms and context.

ENGLISH 105C     Advanced Reading Topics for Non-Native Speakers     Credits: 1-3
In this course, advanced ESL readers will develop the core critical reading skills required for success in academics by examining and applying those skills in the context of authentic college-level readings representing a wide variety of genres and modes. Readings will include extensive college textbook passages, newspaper articles, opinion sections, academic essays and interpretive reading of literature.

ENGLISH 105D     Advanced Writing Topics for Non-Native Speakers     Credits: 1-3
This course engages advanced ESL and EFL writers to develop greater dexterity of expression in composition. In addition to reinforcing core rhetorical skills, grammar and writing mechanics, students will explore new rhetorical styles such as personal responses, autobiographical essays, and writing about literature. Extensive reading complements the writing discussion and practice with pieces including personal and academic essays, narrative, magazine journalism and fiction.

ENGLISH 105G     Advanced Grammar Topics for Non-Native Speakers     Credits: 1-3
In this course, students will pursue an in-depth comprehension of English grammar, with a strong focus on increasing fluency in the English language through a critical analysis of connotation and pragmatics and their role in language fluency. Contextual readings, film and native conversation passages will complement the grammar discussions and practice, engaging students to move beyond a literal understanding based on syntax and semantics to a more contextual awareness of English form and function.

ENGLISH 250     Introduction To Language Acquisition And Diversity     Credits: 3
Investigation of the basic principles of first and second language acquisition. Topics addressed include language competency, socio-cultural factors in language, dialects, acquisitional principles, and language diversity. Students will take part in monitored classroom observations in public schools, and will critically analyze how the topics addressed in class apply to real life and to teaching situations.

A&S 210     Cross-Cultural Interaction: Experience & Understanding     Credits: 3
This course focuses on the social and cultural context of interactional patterns. U.S. and international students are paired in academic activities to encourage mutual understanding and self-awareness. They will draw on a variety of resources and learning modalities to examine aspects of their own and one another's societies, cultures, religions, and family relations. Making use of intercultural theories, students will reflect upon and explore cultural myths and stereotypes and develop a general understanding of cultural similarities and differences.

A&S 310     Cross-Cultural Interaction II: Social Relations     Credits: 3
This course will match international students with U.S. students to prepare them to interact more effectively in multilingual and/or intercultural settings. Students learn through readings on cultural theory and cultural relations, in-class small group activities, discussions and lectures, how issues of identity, such as age, sexual orientation, and ethnicity; impact cross-cultural interaction. Papers written for this course will help students integrate theory with previous experience, leading to an understanding of oppression in cross-cultural interaction.
Prerequisites: A&S 210.

DISC 100     Discourse I: Reasoning and Values (Speech and Writing)     Credits: 3
“Discourse” refers to the language, images, styles, genres, behaviors and other forms of communication used by specific social and professional groups. The techniques of discourse analysis and language awareness taught in this course will enable you to position yourself socially and professionally, helping you understand the discourse conventions, reasoning, and "commonsense" assumptions that create and define academic, political, professional, and other discourse formations and communities. Students will produce, perform, and analyze college-level, oral and written texts; and they will learn how written and oral performances function together in specific discourse communities.
Co-requisites: Anchor I.

DISC 200     Discourse II: Culture and Diversity (Writing and Speech)     Credits: 3
Students will produce, perform, and analyze college-level, oral and written texts that are based on sustained academic research. Students will continue to develop their understanding of discourse analysis and language awareness in the context of a range of discursive forms. Students will interpret and synthesize college-level scholarship that addresses how diverse discourse communities define, evaluate, and transform individual, institutional, and cultural identities. This course is associated with the anchor course Culture and Diversity and prepares students for DISC 300.
Prerequisites: DISC 100.
Co-requisites: Anchor II.

DISC 300     Discourse III: Civic and Community Engagement (Speech and Writing)     Credits: 3
Students will put the knowledge and skills learned in Discourse I and II into practical use by engaging in a service-learning project that is interdisciplinary and intercultural. Students will use strategies of critical discourse analysis and critical language awareness to target the appropriate audience/recipients for their service project, to develop innovative and rhetorically effective texts, and to reflect on their project’s purpose, methods, and consequences. This course is taught in close connection with the anchor course Civic and Community Engagement.
Prerequisites: DISC 200.
Co-requisites: Anchor III.

MGT 301A     Effective Business Communication for Non-Native Speakers     Credits: 3
Students will learn the strategic nature of business communication with a focus on building English language skills and understanding U.S. business terminology and culture. By the end of the course, students should be able to analyze business situations, prepare messages that fulfill the intended purposed of their communication, and meet the needs and expectations of business audiences. Students will develop the tools to deliver effective, professional written and oral communications, in addition to cultivating their English language abilities in the business environment.
Prerequisites: DISC 200, RooWriter.