Scofield Hall, Room 104
711 E. 51st Street
(816) 235-1588
Fax: (816) 235-5760
http://cas.umkc.edu/pace

Mailing Address
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Program for Adult College Education
SH 104
5100 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110-2499

Program Description

The Program for Adult College Education (PACE) provides an alternative for students who have difficulty pursuing a bachelor's degree due to employment, family responsibilities or other obligations. PACE provides nontraditional course offerings and comprehensive student services support; tailored to the needs of adult students. Many PACE courses are presented in 12-hour blocks, arranged by theme or issue. These courses are offered in a special weeknight, weekend and independent study format. There are also numerous Internet, web-assisted, first and second eight week courses.

Bachelor of Liberal Arts Degree (B.L.A.) with a Minor

The B.L.A. with a minor is the most popular degree offered through PACE. This degree program allows enhanced flexibility in selection of academic areas of study for students whose aspirations are not served by a traditional major. Research has shown that individuals with the breadth of knowledge and skills provided by a liberal arts education are in demand by employers. The B.L.A. provides:

  • Broad knowledge and understanding of the natural sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities.
  • Maximum flexibility in course selection.
  • Critical thinking and problem-solving abilities.
  • Personal satisfaction and self-esteem.
  • Multicultural issues awareness.
  • Ability to adapt and work as a team.
  • Increased awareness of values and ethical questions.
  • Interpersonal skills.
  • Written and oral communication skills.

The B.L.A. with a minor is designed to allow all the advantages of a liberal arts education while providing students with an academic specialization. Minors earned in conjunction with the B.L.A. are reflected on official transcripts. Typically it is necessary for students pursuing a minor to take a required course outside of the PACE curriculum. However, select academic departments within the College of Arts and Sciences endeavor to offer their Minor requirements through PACE or as regular eveninig/online courses. Generally, 18 to 24 credit hours are required for a Minor. Before embarking on a BLA with a Minor through this program; students should consult with both a PACE and the respective departmental academic advisor. The following minors are recommended in conjunction with PACE course offerings:

  • Black Studies
  • Chemistry
  • Commercial Economics
  • Communication Studies
  • Criminal Justice and Criminology
  • Economics
  • English
  • Environmental Studies
  • Family Studies
  • Gerontology
  • History  
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Studio Art 

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Majors in Conjunction with PACE

Students can meet many of the B.A./B.S. general degree requirements through the PACE program and, in conjunction with designated disciplines, pursue a major. Degrees associated with an academic unit's evening division or online courses are also recommended for this process. Students should refer to the requisite departmental requirements in the UMKC undergraduate catalog and consult a Department Advisor as well as a PACE Student Services Coordinator or Academic Advisor.

Entry into Graduate/Professional Degree Programs and PACE

The PACE Program provides to students the ability to achieve rigorous academic preparation for graduate and professional degree programs. The B.L.A. is recognized as an appropriate degree for a number of graduate/professional programs at UMKC and elsewhere (e.g., Master of Arts in Liberal Studies, Accounting, Law, Education, Public Administration, Business Administration (MBA), Medicine and Health degrees). Many PACE students continue their studies in graduate degree programs.

PACE Academic Advising

The PACE program takes a highly personalized and comprehensive approach to the needs of nontraditional students. Students will work with a student services coordinator who will assist them from admissions, through the academic process, to graduation. Students can consult the Student Services Coordinator from the PACE Office, on nearly any issue which might impact their academic success. Students wishing to combine PACE coursework with other academic programs and degrees should consult an academic advisor in the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Office and a PACE Student Services Coordinator.

Director:
Reginald Bassa Contact Information

Arts & Sciences Courses

A&S 100 Methodologies In Liberal Arts & Sciences: Theories & Application Credits: 3

This three hour course is designed for freshmen and transfer students, to be taken during their first semester of study at UMKC. The curriculum provides students an introduction to the major disciplines and methodologies of the liberal arts and sciences (the humanities, social sciences, and sciences), including sessions on choosing majors and careers. Additional emphases will include learning to use the library, writing and computational skills, oral presentations, cultural diversity, stress management, and study strategies.

A&S 115 Career Possibilities Credit: 1

This course introduces career development as a complex process of self-assessment and decision-making. Students analyze their personal interests & motivation, conduct self-assessment, identify their personal values, and discuss ethical considerations as they relate to possible career choices. Visiting professionals will provide insight into career options as students explore possible career paths.

A&S 210 Cross-Cultural Interaction: Experience and Understanding Credits: 3

This course focuses on the social and cultural context of interactional patterns. U.S. and international students are paired in academic activities to encourage mutual understanding and self-awareness. They will draw on a variety of resources and learning modalities to examine aspects of their own and one another's societies, cultures, religions, and family relations. Making use of intercultural theories, students will reflect upon and explore cultural myths and stereotypes and develop a general understanding of cultural similarities and differences.

A&S 215 Career Explorations Credit: 1

The primary focus of this course is to complete an in-depth self-assessment and the generation of personalized list of career paths. Personal values will inform these possibilities, which are then explored through job shadowing, informational interviews, visiting lecturers, and independent career research. Ethical considerations of chosen career paths are explored. Students reflect on the professional experiences of others and relate them to their own personal values.

Prerequisites: A&S 115.

A&S 310 Cross-Cultural Interaction II: Social Relations Credits: 3

This course will match international students with U.S. students to prepare them to interact more effectively in multilingual and/or intercultural settings. Students learn through readings on cultural theory and cultural relations, in-class small group activities, discussions and lectures, how issues of identity, such as age, sexual orientation, and ethnicity; impact cross-cultural interaction. Papers written for this course will help students integrate theory with previous experience, leading to an understanding of oppression in cross-cultural interaction.

Prerequisites: A&S 210.

A&S 315 Career Methods Credit: 1

In this course students begin to map out the realization of their career paths. They analyze their career choices, how these choices inform their life plans, articulate the ethical and moral requirements of these careers, and understand how their personal values and strengths match these requirements. Independent career research and entry preparation along with job shadowing, informational interviews, mock interviews, and other preparations required for the selected career choices are included in this class.

Prerequisites: A&S 215.

A&S 341 Union Leadership and Administration Credits: 3

This course focuses on the roles and challenges of union leadership in a changing environment. Topics include the union leaders' role as a representative, organizer and educator as well as administrative responsibilities within the union and the relationship with enterprise management in both adversarial and participatory situations. Options for leadership styles and organizational models will be discussed and explored in both theory and practice. Leaders will develop their skills of motivation, speaking, strategic planning and managing complex campaigns and diverse organizations. This course is part of the Certificate Program in Labor Studies and is offered on the University of Missouri Interactive Video Network at UMKC, UMSL, and UMC.

A&S 350 Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 350A Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 350B Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 350H Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 350R Special Topics Credits: 1-4

An undergraduate course designed to deal with a topic which is not available in the regular course offerings.

A&S 365P Introduction To Substance Abuse Counseling: Theory And Practice Credits: 3

This course will introduce the student to the problems of substance abuse and the methods/techniques used in treatment. The course will explore theories of personality and belief systems of the chemically dependent or alcoholic individual. The course will also review the impact of the disease on the family system

A&S 400B Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-6

A&S 400E Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-6

A&S 400G Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 400H Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 400PD Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-6

A&S 400RR Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 400SA Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-6

A&S 400SB Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 400SS Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 415 The Aging Body: Causes and Consequences Credits: 3

This course will explore biological changes that occur with aging. Plasticity, frailty, stress, coping, and chronic illness will be viewed through the bio-psycho-social lens. Biomedical discoveries and implications for the future of aging will be discussed.

A&S 490B Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 490PB Special Topics Credits: 1-3

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor.

A&S 490S Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 490SA Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 490SB Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 490W Special Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 492 Field Practicum In Aging Credits: 3-8

Students spend 180-480 contact hours in a field placement with supervision in a community agency or organization which services or advocates for older persons, and keep a journal documenting and reflecting on the practicum activities and experiences particularly as they relate to gerontological theory and research.

A&S 5500 Interdisciplinary Colloquium On Aging Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to gerontology as a field of study and as a profession. The context for the emergence of the field is set in important demographic transitions of the 20th century. Identification and understanding of major issues and controversies in the field will help locate the contributions of a range of disciplines to aging studies. The connection of these issues with the development of social policies will be discussed.

A&S 5500C Interdisciplinary Colloquium On Aging III Credits: 1-2

A&S 5500L Special Readings Topics/Philosophy Credits: 1-3

A&S 5500P Special Topics-Readings Psychology Credits: 1-3

A&S 5500Q Special Readings/Topics Theatre Credits: 1-3

A&S 5501 Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

This is a designated Arts and Sciences course which gives all departments in the College the flexibility to offer, on demand and as the need arises, a graduate-level readings course in a particular area of specialization in any discipline in the College. The individual departments determine the content of the course in any given semester in the same manner as any reading course, special topics, or independent study is presently handled. The departments are responsible for approving individuals or groups for the course and determine whether or not the course will be included as a part of a post-baccalaureate degree in their disciplines.

A&S 5501B Special Topics: Critical Thinking In Social Studies Credits: 1-3

A&S 5501D Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 5501E Special Readings/Topics Credits: 1-3

A&S 5501K Special Topics Credits: 1-4

A&S 5502 Introduction To African American Studies Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to the contexts, theories, and methodologies that undergird African American studies. In addition to substantial time spent covering particular research skills and resources, students will also be introduced to African American culture and the issues related to African studies from several perspectives: history, literature, sociology, communication studies, and the like. Influences and perspectives from Africa, the Caribbean, and South America will also be covered. The course will thus provide a broad background in African American culture and history, an introduction to the methodologies of several disciplines, and discussion of particular contemporary and historical issues such as slavery, segregation and integration, the Civil Rights Movement, Pan-Africanism, Afrocentrism, and current political debates.

A&S 5505 Career Education And Transition In Special Education Credits: 3

This course is designed to increase awareness and knowledge about current disabilities legislation, vocational education, vocational rehabilitation, quality transition programs, school to work, self advocacy, workplace accommodations and comprehensive life skills learning.

Prerequisites: EDUC-SP 407 (or equivalent).

A&S 5509 Methods Of Inq: Research Issues And Methods In The Liberal Arts Credits: 3

This course serves as an introduction to various methods of inquiry and research in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. This course includes graduate level instruction in library research use of computer generated research tools and a strong emphasis on academic writing.

A&S 5515 The Aging Body: Causes and Consequences Credits: 3

This course will explore biological changes that occur with aging. Plasticity, frailty, stress, coping, and chronic illness will be viewed through the bio-psycho-social lens. Biomedical discoveries and implications for the future of aging will be discussed.

A&S 5520 Critical Choices: Final Research Project And Capstone Seminar Credits: 3

This seminar is designed as a capstone experience for students in the last semester of their studies in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program. Each student defines a final research project, spends the semester developing it, and presents his or her findings to the seminar at the conclusion of the course. Each project is intended to be thought-provoking and to be researched from an interdisciplinary point of view.

A&S 5535 Directed Studies In Liberal Arts Credits: 1-3

Open to students in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program, this course offers students the opportunity to pursue independent work at the graduate level on selected topics of an interdisciplinary nature, working with faculty members from at least two different departments. The course may not be repeated beyond a total of three credit hours.

A&S 5540 Liberal Arts Thesis Credits: 1-3

Open to students in the Masters of Arts in Liberal Studies Program who wish to include a written thesis in their program of studies. The course may not be repeated beyond a total of three credit hours.

A&S 5550 Seminar In Social Science Perspectives Study Of Community Credits: 3

A&S 5571A Seminar In The Social Sciences Credits: 1-6

This is a designated Arts and Sciences course which gives all departments in the College the flexibility to offer, on demand and as the need arises, a graduate level seminar in a particular area of specialization in any discipline in the college. The individual departments determine the content of the course in any given term in the same manner as any seminar is currently handled.

A&S 5572 Seminar In Philosophy Of Science I Credits: 3

A&S 5591 Practicum In Community Social Science Research Credits: 3

A&S 5592 Field Practicum In Aging Credits: 3-8

Students spend 180-480 hours in a field placement with the supervision in a community agency or organization which services or advocated for older persons and keep a journal documenting and reflecting on the practicum activities and experiences, particularly as related to gerontological theory and research. Students will study a particular subject relevant to their placement and describe this in a written project.

A&S 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Art Courses

ART 105 Introduction To Photography Credits: 3

An introduction to the general practice of photography. The course centers on the basic technical and aesthetic aspects of the medium. A fully adjustable digital camera is required.

ART 112 Foundation Drawing Credits: 3

This course focuses on developing skills and techniques of observational drawing. No previous drawing experience required.

ART 114 Foundation Digital Design Credits: 3

This is an introductory course on techniques, practical applications and aesthetic considerations for digital arts, graphic design, and computer multimedia. Students will create visual projects and learn to participate in a creative class community.

ART 121 Foundation 2D Design Credits: 3

The principles of visual thinking with emphasis on color theory and perception of form and space.

ART 131 Foundation 3D Design Credits: 3

Introductory study in three-dimensional formal principles with emphasis on the aesthetic properties.

ART 204 Digital Video and Motion Design I Credits: 3

This introductory digital video and motion design course is intended for studio majors. General techniques and practical application of animation, video, text and sound in the digital arts and graphic design fields are addressed. Lectures, demonstrations, readings, discussions and application sessions.

Prerequisites: ART 112, ART 114, ART 121 and ART 131.

ART 206 Photography I Credits: 3

An introduction to photography as a means of creative self-expression. The course centers on the technical and aesthetic aspects of the medium.A fully adjustable digital camera is required.

Prerequisites: ART 112, ART 114, ART 121 and ART 131; OR ART 105

ART 212 Intermediate Drawing Credits: 3

Continuation of foundation drawing. Emphasis is on gaining technical facility with various drawing mediums and expanding conceptual approaches.

Prerequisites: ART 112.

ART 214 Ceramics I Credits: 3

Introduction to hand-built and wheel forming methods, concept development, ceramic materials, and firing procedures.

Prerequisites: ART 112 or ART 114 or ART 121 or ART 131.

ART 218 Graphic Design I Credits: 3

A beginning level introduction to Graphic Design principles, such as layout, design, concept, basis design theory, graphic design production, and use of industry-level design software and tools.

Prerequisites: ART 112, ART 114, ART 121, and ART 131.

ART 221 Painting I Credits: 3

Exploration of the visual language in paint with continued emphasis on color and design.

Prerequisites: ART 112, ART 114, ART 121 and ART 131.

ART 224 Print Media I Credits: 3

Through hands-on lessons, students will learn a variety of printmaking methods like intaglio, lithography, relief, etc. and approaches to making visual work. Recommended preparation: ART 212.

Prerequisites: ART 112, ART 114, ART 121, ART 131.

ART 230 Fibers I Credits: 3

From altering the surface of fabric to three-dimensional construction, students are taught the basics of fiber arts. This is a hands-on introduction to surface design and soft sculptural hand processes. The course will cover dyeing, shibori, screen-printing, knitting, crochet, and basic sewing. Projects are individualized by expertise, availability of supplies, and students' own objectives.

Prerequisites: ART 121.

ART 235 Digital Imaging I Credits: 3

This course explores the different ways to connect digital imaging to one's creative practice. Students will learn advanced imaging techniques in order to develop a consistent artistic voice that reflects personal interests and talents. Conceptual issues of digital media will be explored as they relate to contemporary art making.

Prerequisites: ART 114.

ART 305 Photography II Credits: 3

An advanced course in which students develop a deeper understanding of personal interests, sensibilities and goals as they relate to producing and appreciating creative photography. A fully adjustable digital camera is required.

Prerequisites: ART 206.

ART 309 Print Media II Credits: 3

A continuation of ART 224, this course deepens students' understanding of the historical conventions of and contemporary approaches to print media. Explores concepts and techniques through material involvement.

Prerequisites: ART 224.

ART 310 Digital Video and Motion Design II Credits: 3

This intermediate to advanced level digital video and motion design course is a continuation of ART 204. This course is intended for studio majors; it addresses advanced techniques of video post-production and motion graphic design. Lectures, demonstrations, readings, discussions, and application sessions. Recommended Preparation: ART 206 and ART 235.

Prerequisites: ART 204.

ART 311 Painting II Credits: 3

Painting in oil or acrylic on the intermediate level with continued emphasis on color.

Prerequisites: ART 221.

ART 312 Figure Drawing I Credits: 3

A study of the structure of the human figure with emphasis on the dynamics of figure movement.

Prerequisites: ART 212.

ART 327 Interactive Media Design Credits: 3

This course will cover the theoretical, social/cultural, and historical contexts of interactive media; the current importance and usages of the web and social media; and explore methods and tools of exploiting the media through the creation of websites, digital publications, and "apps". Students will learn to use and work with development languages such as HTML 3/5, CSS (cascading style sheets), and content management systems (CMS) such as Wordpress. Students should have an understanding of Adobe Photoshop.

Prerequisites: ART 235.

ART 330 Fibers II Credits: 3

Intermediate study of surface design and soft sculptural hand processes. Projects are individualized by expertise, availability of supplies, and students' own objectives.

Prerequisites: ART 230.

ART 335A Digital Imaging II Credits: 3

This class will strengthen the competence and knowledge of digital imaging techniques. Research, conceptual and verbal abilities within digital image making will be explored. Students will apply new techniques to their personal interests in the studio arts.

Prerequisites: ART 235.

ART 338 Graphic Design II Credits: 3

Intermediate study of graphic design theory, methodology and techniques, stressing a visual approach to problem solving in design, image making techniques, materials, and production processes standard to the industry.

Prerequisites: ART 218 and ART 348.

ART 340 3D Modeling and Animation Credits: 3

This course addresses the usage of virtual three-dimensional modeling and animation in the contemporary art and design fields.

Prerequisites: ART 204.

ART 348 Introduction To Typography Credits: 3

This course explores the formal and applied aspects of typography as tools for design and artistic expression. Focus is on how type relates to art, layout, and design. Both hand produced typography and computer assisted design software will be incorporated.

Prerequisites: ART 112, ART 114, ART 121 and ART 131.

ART 403 Advanced Typography Credits: 3

A continuation of ART 348, this course looks at more sophisticated typographic practice, typographic design theory, and both traditional methods of typographic design and practice such as letterpress and hand type and computer/digital based typography including motion-and time-based media such as web-sites and multimedia.

Prerequisites: ART 348.

ART 405 Practices in the Visual Arts Classroom Credits: 3

Candidates preparing to student teach will master the use of current research in art education, and apply theoretical and practical educational knowledge.

Prerequisites: Permission from SOE advisor required.

ART 406 Advanced Problems In Photography Credits: 3

This course provides students a forum in which the issues and techniques of contemporary photography can be investigated on a rather esoteric level. The format of the course allows for a mutual decision by the instructor and students, dictating which investigations will be pursued during that particular semester. Possible areas of investigation would include, but are not limited to, color photographic theory and practice, non-silver photographic techniques (e.g. Kwikprint, gum bichromate, cyanotype, Van Dyke Brown, etc.), hand coloring techniques, photo-collage, etc.

Prerequisites: ART 305.

ART 411 Painting III Credits: 3

Painting on the intermediate level with a focus on experimentation and developing a personal visual language and expression.

Prerequisites: ART 311.

ART 412 Figure Drawing II Credits: 3

A continuation of ART 312. Drawing on the advanced level with study of the figure in environmental context.

Prerequisites: ART 312.

ART 421 Painting IV Credits: 3

Painting on the advanced level with supervised individual selection of technique and subject matter.

Prerequisites: ART 411.

ART 423WI Design Seminar Credits: 3

Capstone course for studio art majors with a focus on graphic design. Pertinent issues in practice, theory and history of design will be examined through selected readings, slide presentations and invited speakers. A research paper/presentation on a topic evolving from the discussions will be required. The course will also address resume and portfolio preparation for the design profession. This course is writing intensive.

Prerequisites: ART 338, RooWriter.

ART 430 Graphic Design III Credits: 3

Advanced application of graphic design techniques to complex design problems. The course will stress individualized assignments and portfolio preparation.

Prerequisites: ART 338.

ART 439 Student Design Agency Credits: 3-6

This course operates as a faculty-supervised design agency that works with clients to produce visual marketing materials.

ART 488 Creative Project Development Credits: 3

In this class students evaluate their creative goals and styles, as well as artistic abilities, in relation to their professional aspirations. Specific artistic and appropriate technological skills are developed through projects. Prerequisites: ART 114.

ART 492 Advertising Campaigns Credits: 3

This course focuses on branding, re-branding or development of an identity program, and combines advertising planning with creative execution. Students will learn how to develop advertising/marketing/creative campaign plans for a specific client(s), conceptualize, design and develop all creative aspects including but not limited to logo/identity, copy, advertising, website development, app design, etc., and complete a presentation of the plans/briefs and final creative developments of the plans/briefs and creative to the client(s).

Prerequisites: ART 338 or ART 403.

ART 493 Directed Projects in Studio Art Credits: 1-6

With permission of instructor, advanced students pursue independent research and production of a significant semester-long project. Acceptable for graduate credit with approval.

ART 495 Special Topics in Studio Art Credits: 1-6

In depth exploration of a special topic in Studio Art. Course may be repeated if topic is unique for each repeated effort. Acceptable for graduate credit with approval.

ART 498Q Special Studies in Art: Internship Credits: 1-6

Advanced students gain invaluable practical experience in a professional setting in the field of art.

ART 499WI Senior Seminar Credits: 3

Capstone course for studio majors in all media. Course addresses contemporary theoretical and practical issues in studio art practice, and prepares students for graduation. Multiple papers, class presentations, and a portfolio preparation are required.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

ART 5506 Graduate Photography Credits: 3-6

Photography on the graduate level with individual selection of media and technique. May be repeated up to a total of 15 hours.

ART 5510 Graduate Painting Credits: 3-6

Painting on the graduate level with individual selection of medium and technique. May be repeated up to a total of 15 hours.

ART 5513 Graduate Graphic Design Credits: 3-6

Graphic design on the graduate level with individual selection of medium and technique. May be repeated up to a total of 15 hours.

ART 5515 Graduate Drawing Credits: 3-6

Drawing on the graduate level with individual selection of media and technique. Student may pursue selected projects on a group or individual basis. May be repeated up to a total of 15 hours.

ART 5520 Graduate Print Media Credits: 3-6

Print media on the graduate level with individual selection of medium and technique.

ART 5540 Graduate Digital Imaging Credits: 3-6

Digital imaging on the graduate level with individual selection of subject and technique. Permission of the department is required.

ART 5550 Graduate Performance Art Credits: 3-6

Performance art on the graduate level with individual selection of medium and technique. May be repeated up to a total of 15 hours.

ART 5576 Graduate Digital Video and Motion Design Credits: 3-6

Digital video and motion design on the graduate level with individual selection of subject and technique. Permission of the department is required.

ART 5588 Graduate Studio Art Seminar Credits: 3

Studio art seminar for graduate students in any medium. Course will focus on professional practices, as well as the development of a sustainable artistic career. Individual artistic production and shared critiques will be required.

Prerequisites: Studio Art Graduate Students or permission of Art Graduate Advisor

ART 5591 Directed Technical Studies Credits: 2-4

Individually directed studies or research in selected projects of a technical nature in studio art. May be repeated up to a total of six hours applicable to a degree program.

ART 5599 Research And Thesis Credits: 1-9

Production and/or writing of thesis. Usually taken in the last term of candidacy.

ART 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Chemistry Courses

CHEM 111 Physical Basis Of Chemistry Credits: 3

An introductory course in the basic principles applicable to chemistry for students who intend to take but are not adequately prepared to take CHEM 211. The emphasis is on quantitative relationships and problem solving.

CHEM 115 Elements Of Chemistry I Credits: 4

A one-term course in general chemistry with special emphasis on organic chemistry and biochemistry. A terminal course that does not meet requirements as a prerequisite for any higher level chemistry course.

Co-requisites: CHEM 115L.

CHEM 115L Elements Of Chemistry, Laboratory I Credit: 1

A one-term course in general chemistry with special emphasis on organic chemistry and biochemistry. A terminal course that does not meet requirements as a prerequisite for any higher level chemistry course.

Co-requisites: CHEM 115.

CHEM 160 Chemistry, Society, And The Environment Credits: 3

This course is intended to offer a survey of chemical and scientific concepts surrounding current issues. The emphasis will be on the application of fundamental chemical knowledge to allow a full understanding of these issues in the context of currently known facts and theories. Through classroom discussion and application of the scientific method, the ramifications of the issues will be examined. Topics will include pollution, the importance of the chemical industry, its responsibilities to society, and other items of current scientific and environmental interest.

CHEM 160L Laboratory For Chemistry, Society, And The Environment Credit: 1

This course is offered in support of CHEM 160. It will consist of field activities, experiments, and demonstrations to reinforce the concepts and ideas presented in that course.

CHEM 180P Basic Chemistry Credits: 4

A one-semester survey of basic chemistry including: atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and selected topics from organic, polymer and biochemistry. A terminal course that does not meet requirements as a prerequisite for any higher level chemistry course.

Prerequisites: MATH 110 or equivalent.

Corequisite: CHEM 181P.

Cross Listings: CHEM 115.

CHEM 181P Experimental Basic Chemistry Credits: 4

A demonstration/laboratory course designed to support and illustrate the concepts presented in Chemistry 180P. A terminal course that does not meet requirements as a prerequisite for any higher level chemistry course.

Prerequisites: MATH 110 or equivalent.

Co-requisites: CHEM 180P.

Cross Listings: CHEM 115L.

CHEM 182P Special Projects In Chemistry Credits: 4

An independent study course consisting of library work and field work designed to exemplify various applied aspects of chemistry. A terminal course that does not meet requirements as a prerequisite for any higher level chemistry course.

Prerequisites: MATH 110 or equivalent.

Co-requisites: CHEM 180P.

CHEM 206 Human Nutrition Credits: 3

Introduction to nutrition for health and wellness and the use of chemical energy in the breakdown and synthesis of biomolecules. Nutrition as it applies to a variety of life situations from infancy to older adults. Learning encompasses elements of anatomy and physiology related to nutrition and health.

CHEM 211 General Chemistry I Credits: 4

Stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, atomic structure, molecular shapes and bonding theories.

Prerequisites: Working knowledge of College Algebra.

Co-requisites: CHEM 211L.

CHEM 211L Experimental General Chemistry I Credit: 1

Introduction to the laboratory techniques used in studying the chemical properties of substances. Some quantitative techniques are included.

Co-requisites: CHEM 211.

CHEM 212LR Experimental General Chemistry II Credit: 1

Introduction to analysis and synthesis. Descriptive chemistry of the more common elements.

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 and CHEM 211L (or equivalent; each with a C-or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 212R.

CHEM 212R General Chemistry II Credits: 4

Liquids and solids, solutions, equilibrium, kinetics, electrochemistry and thermodynamics. Introductory course to all advanced work in chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 and CHEM 211L (or equivalent; each with a C-or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 212LR.

CHEM 2YC Chemistry Elective LE Credits: 99

Transfer credit

CHEM 311 Laboratory Safety And Health I Credit: 1

An introduction to laboratory safety and health. Topics to be discussed include good laboratory practice; laboratory hazards; safe chemical handling, storage and disposal; first aid; protective equipment; and federal regulations.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320 or CHEM 321 (or equivalent).

CHEM 320 Elementary Organic Chemistry Credits: 4

This one-semester course covers all fundamental principles of organic chemistry, including modern bonding theory, analytical techniques, physical properties, and chemical reactions. This course is designed to satisfy requirements for students in the UMKC Six-Year Medical Program or certain Biology B.A. majors. This course is not recommended for pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy or other pre-health students.

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 / CHEM 211L and CHEM 212R / CHEM 212LR (or equivalents; each with a C- or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 320L.

CHEM 320L Experimental Organic Chemistry Credit: 1

Elementary organic chemistry experiments to teach basic laboratory operations.

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 / CHEM 211L and CHEM 212R / CHEM 212LR (or equivalents; each with a C-or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 320.

CHEM 321 Organic Chemistry I Credits: 3

The two terms (CHEM 321, CHEM 322R) constitute an integrated unit in which the chemistry of aliphatic, aromatic, and some heterocyclic compounds are studied. The study begins with simple monofunctional compounds and ends with polyfunctional natural products.

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 / CHEM 211L and CHEM 212R / CHEM 212LR (or equivalents; each with a C-or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 321L.

CHEM 321L Organic Chemistry Laboratory I Credit: 1

CHEM 321L introduces the student to basic techniques and procedures in isolation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds and simple reactions used in the organic chemistry laboratory. The student will also be trained in the proper way to write a scientific laboratory report.

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 / CHEM 211L and CHEM 212R / CHEM 212LR (or their equivalents; each with a C-or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 321.

CHEM 322L Organic Chemistry Laboratory II Credit: 1

CHEM 322L is an extension of CHEM 321L. CHEM 322L builds from the basic techniques, procedures, and writing to more advanced organic operations.

Prerequisites: CHEM 321 and CHEM 321L (or equivalents; each with a C-or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 322R.

CHEM 322R Organic Chemistry II Credits: 3

Continuation of CHEM 321.

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 / CHEM 211L, CHEM 212R / CHEM 212LR and CHEM 321 / CHEM 321L (or equivalents; each with a C-or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 322L.

CHEM 330 Elementary Physical Chemistry Credits: 3

An introductory course in the principles of physical chemistry for students who have not had calculus.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320, CHEM 322R or CHEM H322R, college physics, and a good background in algebra and trigonometry.

CHEM 341 Analytical Chemistry I: Quantitative Analysis Credits: 4

Principles of gravimetric, volumetric, electrolytic, and other methods of analysis.

Prerequisites: CHEM 212R and MATH 120.

CHEM 341WI Analytical Chemistry I: Quantitative Analysis Credits: 4

Principles of gravimetric, volumetric, electrolytic, and other methods of analysis.

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 / CHEM 211L, CHEM 212R / CHEM 212LR, and MATH 120 (or equivalents; each with a C-or better), RooWriter.

CHEM 345R Instrumental Analysis Credits: 3

An introductory course on the use of instruments for chemical analysis with particular reference to applications of interest to medical technologists and other students in the sciences. Emphasis will be placed on optical, electrochemical and separation methods.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320, CHEM 341, (or equivalents).

CHEM 367 Bioorganic Chemistry Credits: 3

An examination into the current topics at the interface between chemistry and biology. Emphasis will be on the current literature and will include such topics as nucleic acid chemistry, protein chemistry, and carbohydrate chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 321 / CHEM 321L and CHEM 322R / CHEM 322L (or equivalents; each with a C-or better).

CHEM 382 Inorganic And Organic Synthesis Credits: 2

A number of inorganic, organic, and organometallic compounds will be prepared using a variety of synthetic techniques.

Prerequisites: CHEM 321 / CHEM 321L and CHEM 322R / CHEM 322L (or equivalents; each with a C-or better).

CHEM 387 Environmental Chemistry I Credits: 3

A survey of how chemical principles can be applied to the environment. Included will be topics in aquatic chemistry, atmospheric chemistry and chemistry of the geosphere and soil.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320 or CHEM 322R.

CHEM 390 Special Topics In Chemistry Credits: 1-3

This course will focus on an area of chemistry of contemporary significance. The amount of credit is to be determined by arrangement with the department. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies but no more than three hours of credit may be applied to major course requirements.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320, CHEM 322R or CHEM H322R.

CHEM 390PT Special Topics In Chemistry Credits: 1-3

CHEM 392 Chemistry Internship/Practical Training Credits: 1-3

Practical work in chemistry in an industrial, academic or other professional setting. Prior to the start of work, the department must approve the internship/practical training.

Prerequisites: CHEM 211, CHEM 211L, CHEM 212R and CHEM 212LR (or equivalents; each with a C- or better).

CHEM 395 Directed Readings In Chemistry Credits: 1-3

Intensive readings in areas of joint interest to the enrolled student and the cooperating faculty member. Readings may not duplicate or substitute for current course offerings.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320 / CHEM 320L or CHEM 321 / CHEM 321L and CHEM 322R / CHEM 322L (or equivalents; each with a C-or better).

CHEM 399 Intro To Research Credits: 1-3

Special problems to introduce undergraduate chemistry majors to research methods. A comprehensive written report is required and a copy of the report is to be retained in the chemistry office.

Prerequisites: CHEM 212R.

CHEM 410 Chemical Literature Credit: 1

A systematic introduction to the efficient use of the chemical literature. Topics will include both classical search methods and computer search methods.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320 / CHEM 320L or CHEM 321 / CHEM 321L and CHEM 322R / CHEM 322L (or equivalents; each with a C-or better).

CHEM 431 Physical Chemistry I Credits: 3

A first course in physical chemistry having a calculus base. This course emphasizes thermodynamics with an introduction to the basic principles of quantum mechanics.

Prerequisites: MATH 210, MATH 220, MATH 250; and PHYSICS 220 or PHYSICS 250.

CHEM 432 Physical Chemistry II Credits: 3

A second course in physical chemistry having a calculus base. This course emphasizes the quantum mechanics description of atoms and molecules, molecular spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and kinetics.

Prerequisites: MATH 210, MATH 220, MATH 250; and PHYSICS 220 or PHYSICS 250; and CHEM 431 (each with a C-or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 437WI.

CHEM 434 Molecular Spectroscopy Credits: 3

A theoretical introduction to molecular spectroscopy and its relation to structure. Electronic, vibrational and rotational spectra of chemical systems will be discussed.

Prerequisites: CHEM 432.

CHEM 437WI Experimental Physical Chemistry I Credits: 3

Experimental methods in physical chemistry. One hour lecture and six hours laboratory each week. Satisfies writing intensive requirements for the B.A. or B.S. degree.

Prerequisites: MATH 210, MATH 220 and MATH 250; and PHYSICS 220 or PHYSICS 250; and CHEM 431 (each with a C-or better), RooWriter.

Co-requisites: CHEM 432.

CHEM 442R Analytical Chemistry II: Instrumental Analysis Credits: 3

A continuation of CHEM 341. The experimental and theoretical aspects of optical and electrochemical, chromatographic and other physicochemical methods of analysis.

Prerequisites: CHEM 341, CHEM 432.

CHEM 445 Introduction To Principles Of Forensic Investigation Credits: 2

A survey of the physicochemical forensic techniques employed in the detection, examination, processing, preservation and court presentation of evidence.

CHEM 451R Inorganic Chemistry Credits: 3

Modern concepts and theories of inorganic chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 432.

CHEM 471 Introduction To Polymer Chemistry Credits: 3

Survey of organic and inorganic monomers and polymers; the occurrence, synthesis, structures and properties of natural and synthetic polymers; discussion of general properties of plastics, elastomers, fibers, resins, and plasticizers.

Prerequisites: CHEM 432 (C-or better).

CHEM 480 Computer Applications To Chemical Problems Credits: 3

An intense course in Fortran programming and its uses in chemical problems related to theory and experimentation. Emphasis will be placed on the mathematical structures of chemical problems and the coding of those problems into Fortran. No previous programming experience is required.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320 or CHEM 322R.

CHEM 490 Special Topics In Chemistry Credits: 1-3

This course will focus on an area of chemistry of contemporary significance. The amount of credit is to be determined by arrangement with the department. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies but no more than three hours of credit may be applied to major course requirements.

Prerequisites: CHEM 431.

CHEM 495 Directed Readings In Chemistry Credits: 1-3

Intensive readings in areas of joint interest to the enrolled student and the cooperating faculty member. Readings may not duplicate or substitute for current course offerings.

Prerequisites: CHEM 432.

CHEM 499 Senior Research Credits: 1-9

The student is given an original research problem and will be held responsible for all previous experience in working toward its solution. A well-written, comprehensive, and well documented research report is required, and a copy of the report is to be retained in the Chemistry department.

Prerequisites: CHEM 432.

CHEM 5511 Laboratory Safety And Health I Credit: 1

An introduction to laboratory safety and health. Topics to be discussed include good laboratory practice; laboratory hazards; safe chemical handling; storage and disposal; first aid; protective equipment; and federal regulations.

CHEM 5520R Survey Of Organic Chemistry Credits: 3

An intensive advanced survey of the structure, synthesis and reactions of organic compounds.

CHEM 5521R Mechanisms Of Organic Reactions Credits: 3

A comprehensive course in which the mechanisms of organic reactions are discussed in light of modern chemical principles.

Prerequisites: CHEM 322R and CHEM 432.

CHEM 5522 Synthetic Organic Chemistry Credits: 3

A critical approach to the synthesis and modification of organic molecules; newer methods will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: CHEM 322R and CHEM 432.

CHEM 5529 Selected Topics In Organic Chemistry Credits: 3

Selected topics from the chemistry and theories of organic structures with particular attention to recent developments.

CHEM 5530 Systematic Physical Chemistry Credits: 3

An intensive and comprehensive review of the principles of physical chemistry. This course may either emphasize thermodynamics with an introduction to principes of quantum mechanics or emphasize quantum mechanical description of atoms and molecules, molecular spectroscopy, statistical mechanics and kinetics.

CHEM 5530A Physical Chemistry I Credits: 3

This graduate course reviews principles of physical chemistry, focusing on thermodynamics, equilibria and electrochemistry.

CHEM 5530B Physical Chemistry II Credits: 3

This graduate course reviews principles of physical chemistry, focusing on quantum chemistry, molecular spectroscopy and structure, and kinetics.

CHEM 5531 Classical Thermodynamics Credits: 3

A rigorous treatment of the laws of thermodynamics and their application to ideal and non-ideal equilibrium systems.

CHEM 5532 Chemical Kinetics Credits: 3

Empirical analysis of chemical reaction rates. Theories of unimolecular and bimolecular reactions, reactions in solution and complex reactions. Review of modern and classical techniques used to study chemical kinetics.

CHEM 5533 Quantum Chemistry Credits: 3

Application of quantum mechanical methods to the study of systems of chemical interest. Exact solutions and approximate methods will be discussed.

CHEM 5534 Molecular Spectroscopy Credits: 3

A theoretical introduction to molecular spectroscopy and its relation to structure. Electronic, vibrational and rotational spectra of chemical systems will be discussed.

CHEM 5535 Statistical Thermodynamics Credits: 3

A rigorous treatment of the fundamental concepts of statistical thermodynamics, with applications to specific systems that reflect the interests of students participating in the course.

CHEM 5539 Selected Topics In Physical Chemistry Credits: 3

Selected topics and recent developments in physical chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 5530.

CHEM 5541R Advanced Analytical Chemistry Credits: 3

An intensive review of modern concepts of analytical chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 432.

CHEM 5551R Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I Credits: 3

A systematic treatment of bonding, structure, reactions and reaction mechanisms of inorganic compounds, with emphasis on classical transition metal compounds and organometallic compounds.

Prerequisites: CHEM 451R or equivalent.

CHEM 5559 Selected Topics In Inorganic Chemistry Credits: 3

Various special topics in the inorganic area to be offered in different semesters.

Prerequisites: CHEM 5551R.

CHEM 5567 Advanced Bioorganic Chemistry Credits: 3

This course examines the organic chemistry and laboratory synthesis of the major biopolymers and organic chemistry related to biological systems. Emphasis is on literature and library research and natural product and solid phase organic synthesis, combinatorial synthesis, bioconjugates and applied bioorganic chemistry.

CHEM 5571R Introduction To Polymer Chemistry Credits: 3

Survey of organic and inorganic monomers and polymers; the occurrence, synthesis, structures and properties of natural and synthetic polymers; discussion of general properties of plastics, elastomers, fibers, resins and plasticizers.

Prerequisites: CHEM 432.

CHEM 5580R Computer Applications To Chemical Problems Credits: 3

An intense course in FORTRAN programming and its uses in chemical problems related to theory and experimentation. Emphasis will be placed on the mathematical structures of the chemical problems and the coding of these problems into Fortran. No previous programming experience is required.

CHEM 5587 Environmental Chemistry I Credits: 3

A survey of how chemical principles can be applied to the environment. Included will be topics in aquatic chemistry, atmospheric chemistry and chemistry of the geosphere and soil.

CHEM 5588 Environmental Chemistry II Credits: 3

Discussion of selected topics in advanced environmental chemistry, such as environmental toxicology, environmental risk, the chemistry of hazardous wastes and their treatment, and environmental analytical chemistry.

CHEM 5590 Directed Studies Credits: 1-3

Intensive readings and/or research in an area selected by the graduate student in consultation with the instructor.

CHEM 5598 Research Methodology Conference Credits: 3

Student will meet on an individual basis with two faculty members who are involved in research. The student's adviser will coordinate this course.

CHEM 5599 Research And Thesis Credits: 1-9

Research for thesis.

CHEM 5611 Chemistry Seminar Credit: 1

Presentation and discussion of topics currently appearing in United States and foreign literature.

CHEM 5699 Research And Dissertation Credits: 1-16

Research for dissertation.

CHEM 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

CHEM H206 Human Nutrition Credits: 3

Introduction to nutrition for health and wellness and the use of chemical energy in the breakdown and synthesis of biomolecules. Nutrition as it applies to a variety of life situations from infancy to older adults. Learning encompasses elements of anatomy and physiology related to nutrition and health.

CHEM H212R Honors: Organic Chemistry I Credits: 4

CHEM H321 Honors: Organic Chemistry I Credits: 3

CHEM H321L Organic Chemistry Laboratory I - Honors Credit: 1

A more intense version of CHEM 321L.

CHEM H322L Organic Chemistry Laboratory II Credit: 1

CHEM 322L is an extension of CHEM 321L. CHEM 322L builds from the basic techniques, procedures, and writing to more advanced organic operations.

Prerequisites: CHEM 321 and CHEM 321L (or equivalent; each with a C-or better).

Co-requisites: CHEM 322R.

CHEM H322LR Organic Chemistry Laboratory II-Honors Credits: 2

A more intense version of CHEM 322L. See course description for CHEM 322L.

Prerequisite: CHEM 321L.

CHEM H322R Honors: Organic Chemistry II Credits: 3

CHEM H399 Introduction To Research Credits: 1-3

Special problems to introduce undergraduate chemistry majors to research methods. A comprehensive written report is required and a copy of the report is to be retained in the chemistry office. May be taken only after consultation with a member of the chemistry staff.

Prerequisites: CHEM 212R.

CHEM H499 Senior Research - Honors Credits: 1-9

Course frequency subject to enrollments, staffing and financial exigency.

Communication & Technology Courses

CIT 105P Foundations Of Computing And Problem Solving Credits: 4

This course covers the fundamentals of computer use, problem solving, and programming. Specific topics include: the general use of micro and mainframe computers, algorithm design, the relation of algorithms to programs, the fundamentals of programming in the PASCAL language, and program debugging techniques. This course is presented only in a PACE program format.

Co-requisites: MATH 110.

CIT 106P Computers: Their Uses And Impact Credits: 4

This course covers the history of computing, concepts in and classes of computer hardware and software, classes of computer application, economic issues in the development of computer hardware and software products, and philosophical, social and legal issues in the use (and abuse) of computer technology. This course is presented only in a PACE program format.

CIT 310P Web Design & Development Credits: 3

This three hour course, Web Design and Development, is designed to introduce the student to the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) and its use for the development of web pages. This course is offered online and no scheduled classroom attendance will be required. Correspondence through emails and the class forum is strongly encouraged.

Prerequisites: CIT 105P.

CIT 315P Web Graphics & Multimedia Credits: 3

This three hour course, Web Graphics and Multimedia, is a continuation to Web Design and Development. The course material will cover different development tools used to incorporate graphics, sounds, and videos into web pages. This course is offered online and no scheduled classroom attendance will be required. Correspondence through emails and the class forum is required.

Prerequisites: CIT 105P.

Criminal Justice & Criminology Courses

CJC 101 Introduction To Criminal Justice Credits: 3

This introductory overview course is designed to familiarize students with the three main components of the adult criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course will investigate the viewpoints of offenders, victims, social scientists, the general public, and workers in the system on diverse issues of social control, criminal behavior, treatment and punishment.

CJC 210 Introduction To Statistics In Sociology/Criminal Justice Credits: 3

A first course in the statistical analysis of quantitative data. Course emphasizes descriptive statistics, probability theory, parameter estimation, bivariate hypothesis testing, and computer applications.

Prerequisites: MATH 110, MATH 116 (or equivalent).

Cross Listings: SOCIOL 263.

CJC 215 Methods Of Criminological Research Credits: 3

A seminar which explores the interrelationships between sociology theory, research methods and statistics. May focus on major contemporary issues building on and integrating knowledge obtained in previous courses.

CJC 220 Theoretical Criminology Credits: 3

A comprehensive examination of the major criminology theories, their philosophical assumptions, and the socio-historical context in which they were articulated.

CJC 240 Delinquency And Juvenile Justice Credits: 3

This course focuses on the nature, extent and theoretical explanations of delinquency and the history and philosophy behind the juvenile justice system in terms of the roles played by law enforcement, juvenile courts, and corrections. Juvenile groups such as status offenders, delinquents, gang members, victims, and juveniles adjudicated as adult criminals will also be examined.

CJC 280 Gangs and Crime Credits: 3

This course will provide students with an overview of what is known about street gangs. Specifically, the course will cover definitional issues, gang organization and structure, gang culture, gang member onset and desistance, among other issues related to criminal street gangs. This course will also encourage students to think critically about communities, crime, and group formation.

CJC 282 Criminal Justice & Criminology in Popular Media Credits: 3

This course examines criminology and criminal justice as it is represented in popular film to explore critically the impact media has on the public's perception of the criminal justice system, the origin of criminal behavior, and the broad sociological constructs of criminology. A key focus is the media's power to shape criminal justice policy and practice.

CJC 332 Race, Class and Justice Credits: 3

This course examines the intersection of race and class as it relates to crime and justice. Specifically, the course focuses on race and class in relation to criminological theory and the application of justice system practices and policies.

Cross Listings: BLKS 480.

CJC 350 Social Deviance Credits: 3

The dominant sociological perspectives on deviance will be discussed with special attention given to the processes that define behavior and persons as deviant and the impact of such definitions on social relationships and identity.

Cross Listings: SOCIOL 320.

CJC 351 Policing In The Community Credits: 3

The purpose of this class is to introduce the student to police operations and the effectiveness of different police programs. The material discussed in class focuses on empirical evaluations of police effectiveness, and the role of the police in today's society. This class is divided into four broad areas: the nature and effectiveness of patrol; criminal investigations; special operations including crackdowns, responses to domestic assaults, and hot spot policing; and the latest crime prevention strategies, such as community oriented policing and problem solving.

CJC 354 Policing in America Credits: 3

A comparison of law enforcement and peace-keeping functions of the police provides a basic theme for the course, with examination of several topics related to police accomplishing these functions. Some of the topics covered include police discretion, police professionalism, the police officer as a bureaucratic agent, and police-community relations.

CJC 361 Principles & Practices of Criminal Courts Credits: 3

The course examines the American criminal judicial system, including the history, philosophy, and changing nature of criminal courts. The activities of lawyers, judges, and related professionals are emphasized, and current topics involving the criminal court are discussed.

CJC 364 The Supreme Court And The Criminal Process Credits: 3

Course examines recent Supreme Court decisions on the constitutional aspects of the administration of justice. Topics include the nationalization of the Bill of Rights and jurisdiction with an emphasis on problems involving the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and 14th Amendments.

CJC 370 Principles Of Corrections Credits: 3

This course explores adult institutional and community-based corrections in the United States. Major areas examined include the evolution of corrections, the process of correctional reform, adult offenders and prison culture, treatment and rehabilitation of offenders, intermediate sanctions, and correctional workers.

CJC 371 Community Corrections Credits: 3

This course will examine intermediate sanctions in the United States, such as probation, halfway houses, boot camps, among others. Specifically, the origin and proliferation of the use of corrections in the community will be explored in depth. The effectiveness of several major community correctional strategies will be explored through a review of the research literature base. Several issues will be highlighted including (but not limited to ) ethical constraints, political problems, and treatment effectiveness in light of the use of community sanctions.

CJC 380 Psycho-Social Determinants of Crime & Delinquency Credits: 3

This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of crime and delinquency outlining biological, developmental, psychological, social-psychological, and societal factors associated with criminal behavior. The course also focuses on ways in which these factors may be integrated to solve, explain, and prevent crimes.

CJC 383 Policies Of Drug Use And Control Credits: 3

Utilizing both historical and contemporary information, this course provides an assessment of the "drug problem" in the U.S. and policies of control developed in response to the problem. Drug use criminalization, legalization, medical treatment, and prevention strategies and related issues are considered in regard to scientific knowledge related to the patterns, causes, and impact of substance abuse.

CJC 385 Victimology Credits: 3

This course addresses the study of crime, criminals and victims. It examines the relationship between victims and offenders. Special treatment is given to criminological as well as victimological theories. A segment of the course will address the sporadic nature of juvenile crime. The course will examine viable strategies to reduce levels of victimization. In the final analysis the course will offer crime prevention strategies.

CJC 390 New Dimensions In Criminal Justice Credits: 3

Examination of contemporary topics, issues or problems related to the development of justice and/or operations in response to criminal and related behaviors addressed by the justice system. May be repeated for credit.

CJC 430 Women, Crime And Criminal Justice Credits: 3

This course will focus on the experiences of women and girls with crime in America. The primary areas studied will be females as victims, offenders, and professionals in the criminal justice system. Various criminological theories and research will also be examined in light of gender.

CJC 431 Hate & Bias Crimes Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to examine the development and enforcement of hate crime law within our legal system. Discussion focuses on the causes and consequences of hate crimes, the constitutional issues associated with bias crime statutes, and the effectiveness of formal and informal social controls for eliminating hate and bias crimes.

CJC 435WI Gender And Law Credits: 3

This course examines the contemporary legal rights and obligations of women in light of the historical relationships between the social status of women and their legal status. Topics investigated include proprietary and contractual rights, family law, employment practices, educational opportunities, and women as victims and perpetrators of crime.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

CJC 481 Restorative Justice Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the concept of restorative justice. The course examines the roots of the concept, its theoretical perspective, and its applications in juvenile justice, mediation and correctional settings.

CJC 482 The Death Penalty In America Credits: 3

This course takes a sociological look at the most extreme punishment currently in use in the United States. Society debates its value without giving much weight to the research which social science conducts. Indeed, the political domain frequently misrepresents the data that is available. The course evaluates the adequacy of the research and separates the strands of the debates in order to understand the role of the death penalty in our society.

CJC 484 White Collar Crime Credits: 3

This course examines activities variously called white-collar crimes, crimes of privilege, corporate and government crimes, and upperworld crimes. The purposes of the course are (1) to describe, analyze, and assess social impact of these offenses, (2) to examine the capacity of existing theories in criminology and social deviance to account for those activities, (3) to describe the responsibilities, powers, and activities of those agencies which have jurisdiction over them, and (4) to assess the effectiveness of various legal sanctions in controlling such activities and to review the problems involved in legislation intended to achieve that control.

CJC 488 Mentoring Juvenile Justice System-Involved Youth Credits: 3

Youth mentoring experience in a juvenile justice setting with required training and classroom study.

Prerequisites: successful background check completion.

CJC 490 Directed Studies In Criminal Justice And Criminology Credits: 1-3

Individual research and study in the student's field of interest as approved and directed by major professors. The work involves examination and reporting of selected problems affecting the various agencies of our legal system. Only two of the 490 sequence courses can be applied to the major. A. Law Enforcement B. Court Operations and Administration C. Corrections D. Legal Theory and Philosophy E. Criminological Theory F. Sociology of Law.

CJC 491 Internship In Criminal Justice Credits: 3-6

Intern experience under faculty supervision in local, state, federal or private agencies working with justice system involved offenders.

Prerequisites: CJC 101, junior standing.

CJC 492 Topics In Criminal Justice Credit: 1

Specialized, short courses with focused examination of particular topics germane to the study of the justice system. May be repeated for credit.

CJC 495WI Capstone: Criminal Justice And Criminology Credits: 3

This course is designed to integrate student's program of study in the major of criminal justice and criminology. The class examines current conditions of the justice system with respect of race, gender and social class.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

CJC 5500 Sociology Of Law Credits: 3

A sociological study of the legal system with focus on organizational analyses of the legal profession, courts as a social system, the bureaucratization of the legal process, stratification and the allocation of legal services and careers.

CJC 5511 Sociological Methods II Credits: 3

Quantitative research is the primary focus of the course; emphasis is placed on problem formulation; research design; sampling procedures, questionnaire construction and interviewing techniques; data collection; problems of scaling, computer statistical programs; linking appropriate statistical analyses with data analysis; and report writing.

Prerequisites: CJC 483 or equivalent.

Cross Listings: SOCIOL 5511.

CJC 5515 Qualitative Research Methods in Criminal Justice Credits: 3

This course focuses on qualitative research methods, such as interviewing techniques, focus groups, content analysis, and field observation. Emphasis is placed on research design, data collection, and data analysis.

Prerequisites: CJC 483 or equivalent.

CJC 5516 Intermediate Statistics Credits: 3

A systematic development of the logic and practice of selected statistical methods used in sociological research. Included are analysis of variance and covariance, regression analysis, multiple contingency, and non-parametric tests.

Prerequisites: CJC 363 or equivalent.

Cross Listings: SOCIOL 5516.

CJC 5518 Advanced Criminological Theory Credits: 3

This course provides an understanding of past as well as present criminological theories by examining each criminological tradition (beginning in the 18th century and continuing into the present.) The primary aim of the course is to determine the root causes of deviant and criminal behaviors. Moreover, this course offers special attention to how society has historically reacted and responded to crime and deviant behavior. Furthermore, by examining crime and deviant behavior from a historical context, the students are able to determine how criminological theories have influenced public policies designed to reduce and control criminal behavior. In the final analysis, students will examine the rationales that society use to justify efforts toward punishment and treatment.

Prerequisites: CJC 319 or equivalent.

CJC 5520 Juvenile Justice Credits: 3

This course provides a historical and contemporary overview of the juvenile justice system via a critical examination of the function of this system and theories explaining delinquency in adolescence. We will explore special topics within juvenile justice and proposals for juvenile justice reform.

CJC 5551 Seminar In Policing Credits: 3

This course addresses the important topics related to the institution of policing. Through readings and class discussions, students will gain a better understanding of both historical aspects of policing as well as the future of policing. Topics include selection, training and socialization, police management, deviance and corruption, use of force, community oriented policing.

CJC 5565 Seminar In Crime Prevention Credits: 3

This seminar examines variations in methods to reduce crime in America, including strategies from the criminal justice system as well as other institutions. Building on established criminological theory, this seminar will evaluate the best practices to prevent crime across a variety of social contexts.

CJC 5570 Contemporary Corrections And Correctional Policy Credits: 3

Present-day correctional alternatives are considered regarding the correctional policy that is, or potentially can be, carried out within the various programs. Prisons, probation, parole community-based programs are evaluated as to the theory of punishment demonstrated within these programs. Emphasis is placed on what constitutes a rational and workable corrections policy and the form of correctional programs needed to realize such policy.

CJC 5575 Correctional Rehabilitation And Treatment Credits: 3

This course will begin with a thorough examination of the rise, fall, and recent resurrection of "rehabilitation and treatment" in American correctional strategies. Both past and current treatment strategies will be studied regarding their effectiveness in reducing recidivism. This will be done through a survey of the quantitative literature base. There will be some emphasis on treating special needs offenders (e.g., sex offenders, juvenile offenders, offenders with developmental disabilities or mental illnesses.)

CJC 5576 Seminar In Criminal Justice And Criminology Issues Credits: 3

This course is an advanced exploration of the relationship between the criminal justice system and criminal behavior from at least one of the following perspectives: psychological, sociological, economic, legal, political or administration/ management. Will include discussions and analysis of contemporary readings and on-going research in the selected perspective.

CJC 5580 Seminar: Policy And Decision Making In Criminal Justice Credits: 3

The focus of the course is assessment of the character and recent crime trends in the United States, with attention to identifying elements that shape justice system policies in response to crime. Consideration is given to the nature and scope of policy and decision-making processes in legal institutions and law enforcement bureaucracies, how such policies have impacted crime, and alternative policies address the problem of crime.

CJC 5590 Directed Studies In Criminal Justice And Criminology Credits: 1-3

Individual research and study in the student's field of interest as approved and directed by major professors. The work involves examination and reporting of selected problems affecting the various agencies of our legal system. A. Law Enforcement B. Court Operations and Administration C. Corrections D. Legal Theory and Philosophy E. Criminological Theory F. Sociology of Law.

CJC 5592 Advanced GIS For Crime Analysis Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of crime mapping as it relates to the spatial and temporal analysis of crime. Utilizing theory related to criminal offending, this course will provide students with hands-on experience in geographic profiling and crime prevention strategies.

Prerequisites: GEOG 203 or equivalent.

CJC 5595 Crime Analysis Internship Credits: 3

This experience involves working with crime analysts in the field. Students will learn and hone practical skills while being supervised by department faculty or staff.

Prerequisites: CJC 5592.

CJC 5599 Research And Thesis Credits: 1-6

Directed specialized research. Before writing a thesis, the student must clear the topic and research design with the Supervisory Committee.

CJC 5699 Dissertation Research Credits: 1-12

Individual directed research leading to preparation and completion of doctoral dissertation.

Prerequisites: Ph.D. course requirements completed.

CJC 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Communication Studies Courses

COMM-ST 110 Fundamentals Of Effective Speaking And Listening Credits: 3

An introduction to the dimensions of effective platform speaking with special emphasis on developing critical listening skills. Lecture, performance, and discussion.

COMM-ST 140 Principles Of Communication Credits: 3

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of contemporary communication studies including a consideration of intrapersonal, interpersonal and public communication.

COMM-ST 203 Introduction to Journalism Credits: 3

Introduction to the styles and techniques of reporting and writing basic news through assignments in straight news, features and in-depth stories. Exposure to the history and principles of American journalism. Practical application in writing news and news feature articles.

COMM-ST 212 Argumentation And Debate Credits: 3

A study of the nature of logical discourse generated through the preparation and presentation of oral argument within the framework of the debate format. Lecture, performance and discussion.

COMM-ST 213 Argumentation And Critical Thought Credits: 3

An introduction to the theory and application of argument construction. The course is designed to examine the fundamental strategies of critical thinking and to help understand the relationships among critical thought and argumentation development and refutation. This course is designed for application across many fields and is not specific to debate or oral argument.

COMM-ST 220 Introduction: Modern Communications Media Credits: 3

A comprehensive survey of the content, structure and control of the communications media in American society--newspaper, motion pictures, radio and television; providing an informational frame of reference that will enable discerning students to formulate and apply useful critical concepts in evaluating America's media environment.

COMM-ST 250 Introduction to Film and Video Production Credits: 3

This course teaches the fundamentals of media making using digital video. Students will learn techniques in pre-production planning, camera, sound, and editing by creating a series of short videos. Students will also learn to think analytically about film, and to apply insights about what gives an image impact and meaning to their own work. It is the foundation and prerequisite for all film and video production courses in the department.

COMM-ST 260P Introduction To Web Communications Credits: 4

This four credit hour web-based multimedia course will examine the process of critically evaluating information delivered on the Internet. It is designed as an introduction for adults and students who use Internet information for work and/or school. The process of critically evaluating Internet information will be described in four modules: traditional evaluation techniques; searching and researching strategies; Internet evaluation techniques and Internet evaluation resources.

COMM-ST 265 Visual Communication Credits: 3

This course introduces the creative capture and design of photographic images as used in both print and new media for advertising, journalism, and public relations. Basic artistic and production methods are examined, including real-world professional practices and the creative control of process variables.

COMM-ST 300CY Cluster Course: Ancient World/Cinema Credits: 3

This course will explore the tradition of depicting the ancient Mediterranean world in film from the early silent era to the present. Topics to be covered include the ways that filmmakers respond to literary and historical sources from the ancient world, interact with the artistic tradition of films about the ancient world, the relation of these films to other works by the same creative personnel (directors, actors, writers, producers, etc.), and the political and cultural contexts in which the films were released.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 300CY, ENGLISH 300CY, HISTORY 400CY.

COMM-ST 308 Introduction To The Study Of Human Communication Credits: 3

This course serves to introduce students to the basic theories, perspectives and methodologies used (historically and currently) in the study of speech, interpersonal and mass communication.

COMM-ST 311 Radio & Television Performance Credits: 3

A study of the specialized radio and television performing and operating situations and techniques simulated and evaluated in studio sessions. Lecture, discussion and performance.

COMM-ST 312 Advanced Public Speaking Credits: 3

Advanced study of rhetorical theory and its application to the presentation and criticism of public discourse.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 110.

COMM-ST 312P Advanced Public Speaking Credits: 3

Advanced study of rhetorical theory and its application to the presentation and criticism of public discourse.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 110.

COMM-ST 314 Reporting Credits: 3

Reporting is an advanced news gathering and reporting course designed to sharpen the writing skills and critical thinking of student journalists.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 203 or ENGLISH 203.

COMM-ST 314WI Reporting Credits: 3

A seminar of practical application in advanced reporting. Assignments to cover news events and to pursue in-depth news reports on the campus and off.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 203 or ENGLISH 203; RooWriter.

COMM-ST 317 Persuasion Credits: 3

A study of the rhetorical, psychological and ethical principles of influencing and controlling individuals and groups, and of the methods of adapting to various attitudes and audiences through the preparation, presentation and evaluation of persuasive speeches. Lecture, discussion and performance.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 110.

COMM-ST 320 Mass Media, Culture And Society Credits: 3

A critical exploration of the role of mass media (and its reception) in the social construction of reality. The course employs theoretical, analytical and empirical approaches derived from multidisciplinary sources, particularly "critical theory" semiology, post-structuralism, psychoanalysis and ethnography. Term paper required.

COMM-ST 322 Oral Performance In Speech Communication Credits: 3

This course is designed to develop and strengthen oral communication for students pursuing careers in pre-law, media, human resources, and education as well as increase the skills of potential professional speakers. The student will learn to develop emotional, vocal, physical, and non-verbal skills through an investigation of poetry, prose, and non-fiction literature. Through the process of reading, studying, investigating, rehearsing, and performing literary and nonliterary works, the students will learn to pay particular attention to the voice embodied in a given text and the cultural and social context within which that voice speaks.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 110.

COMM-ST 323 Concepts of the Hero in Ancient Literature and World Cinema Credits: 3

This course explores how concepts of heroism are related to the principles of values and civic duty in a wide range of ancient world cultures and contemporary world cinemas. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of how these values impact individual heroes and their interactions with others in their society.

COMM-ST 330 Introduction To Film Studies Credits: 3

The course is an introduction to the study of film as an art form and industrial practice. Students are introduced to the basic terms and concepts of film theory, including theories of film editing and mise-en-scene while becoming familiar with the basic "canon" of major films and directors that form the foundations for the academic field of film studies.

Prerequisites: DISC 100 or ENGLISH 110.

COMM-ST 331 Mass Media In America Credits: 3

Social history of the development of mass media, radio, film, and television, from Marconi's first experiments to the present. Emphasis placed on relationship of American culture and American media. Term paper required.

COMM-ST 331WI Mass Media In America Credits: 3

Writing intensive. Social History of the development of mass media, radio, film and television, from Marconi's first experiments to the present. Emphasis placed on relationship of American culture and American media. Term paper required.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

COMM-ST 339 Introduction to Film Theory Credits: 3

A survey of the history of theoretical and critical approaches to film theory/philosophy. Students will be introduced to major foundational and contemporary theoretical approaches to cinema that may include but are not limited to formalism, realism, auteurism, psychoanalysis, genre studies, structuralism, feminism, semiotics, cultural studies, post-structuralism, queer theory and digital studies.

COMM-ST 341 Rhetorical Theory And Criticism Credits: 3

An analysis of significant public discourse within the context of social protest and political rhetoric with attention to applying methods of communication criticism in evaluating the effectiveness of persuasive advocacy aimed at social change.

COMM-ST 341WI Rhetorical Theory And Criticism Credits: 3

Writing intensive. An analysis of significant public discourse within the context of social protest and political rhetoric with attention to applying methods of communication criticism in evaluating the effectiveness of persuasive advocacy aimed at social change.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

COMM-ST 343 Group Dynamics Credits: 3

A study of strategies and communication relationships unique to non-dyadic situations, with an emphasis on the integral structure of leadership, roles, norms and task functions.

COMM-ST 344 Communication In Organizational Settings Credits: 3

An examination of the major elements of interpersonal, group, and oral communication competence essential to human interaction in organizational settings. The course focuses on developing communication competencies and increasing theoretical understanding of the communication process within the organizational context.

COMM-ST 344WI Communication In Organizational Settings Credits: 3

An examination of the major elements of interpersonal, group, and oral communication competence essential to human interaction in organizational settings. The course focuses on developing communication competencies and increasing theoretical understanding.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 110 or COMM-ST 308, RooWriter.

COMM-ST 345 German Film Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the important contributions of German films to the development of movies as a unique literary art form. The class will cover important terms and concepts in film theory, the specifically German context of film, and important themes and periods in German film history. Taught in English with subtitled films.

Cross Listings: GERMAN 341.

COMM-ST 346 Art of the Short Film Credits: 3

Art of the Short Film examines the social, economic and aesthetic histories of narrative, documentary and experimental short form films from the birth of cinema to today.

COMM-ST 347 Topics in Film Genre Credits: 3

A topics course that examines the history and theory of film genres. Repeatable up to six hours when the topic changes.

COMM-ST 348 The Art of the Interview Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the styles and techniques of conducting professional interviews with the goal of eliciting insightful, thoughtful answers fit for print or broadcast. Students will prepare Q&A interviews and articles for publication while gaining the confidence needed to work in professional newsrooms or office settings.

COMM-ST 351WI Fundamentals Of Writing For The Media Credits: 3

Analysis of individual differences and common characteristics of copy for eye and ear, with emphasis on the application of both verbal and visual imagery in the process of communicating the writer's ideas and intentions. Weekly written assignments and critical analysis of the student's work.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 110, RooWriter.

COMM-ST 354 Introduction to Screenwriting Credits: 3

An introduction to the form and language of the motion picture screenplay. Students will learn to create a workable blueprint for a movie and undertake an in-depth examination of visual storytelling. This will include understanding the basics of dramatic structure, scene and sequence construction and the role of dialogue. Emphasis will be placed on students mastering the accepted movie industry format of the screenplay. They will also adapt a short story and revise it after giving and receiving feedback in small groups.

COMM-ST 355WI The New Feature Writing Credits: 3

An intensive practicum in the art of writing feature stories with a special emphasis on shorter stories that will grab reader interest in an era of short-attention spans.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 203 or ENGLISH 203.

COMM-ST 360WI Public Affairs Reporting Credits: 3

This course offers practical experience in the coverage of local, state and national political races as well as the issues that dominate political discourse and policy-making.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 203 or ENGLISH 203

COMM-ST 361 Media Management Credits: 3

An analysis of the trends, patterns and methods of radio and television operations.

COMM-ST 363 Radio Production I Credits: 3

A study of the techniques of producing audio material for use in radio, in concerts, on film, on television and in the recording studio.

COMM-ST 373 Intermediate Media Production Credits: 3

An intermediate-level production course emphasizing hands-on skills in cinematography and lighting, sound, and editing.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 250, COMM-ST 330.

COMM-ST 376 History Of The Film Industry Credits: 3

A history of the development of the American film industry from 1900 to the end of the studio era. The course will stress such issues as studio production, censorship, the economics of production and the selling of mass culture through the film medium. Term paper required.

COMM-ST 377 Interpersonal Communication Credits: 3

An intensive analysis of the dimensions of intrapersonal and interpersonal communication designed to identify the philosophies and methods which underwrite effective human communication. Lecture and discussion.

COMM-ST 377WI Interpersonal Communication Credits: 3

An intensive analysis of the dimensions of intrapersonal and interpersonal communication designed to identify the philosophies and methods which underwrite effective human communication. Lecture and discussion.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

COMM-ST 378 Computer-Mediated Communication Credits: 3

Examination of the nature of human communication on the Internet. Design function, content innovations of computer mediated communication discussed, with emphasis on technology as a means of interpersonal communication. Research, essays, and participation in online environment required.

COMM-ST 378WI Computer Mediated Communication Credits: 3

Examination of the nature of human communication on the internet. Design, function, content innovations of computer mediated communication discussed, with emphasis on technology as a means of interpersonal communication. Research, essays, and participation in online environment required.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

COMM-ST 380 Contemporary Media Topics Credits: 3

COMM-ST 381 Narrative Production Credits: 3

This course covers the creative, technical, and practical aspects of short-form narrative film production.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 250 and COMM-ST 354.

COMM-ST 383 Cross-Cultural Journalism & Mass Media Credits: 3

Cross-Cultural Journalism & Mass Media provides journalistic tools for traditional and new media coverage of diverse ethnic, gender, ability and ideological groups inside and outside the United States. The critical role of diverse voices in a democracy will be discussed.Students at UMKC and the Missouri School of Journalism participate in joint lectures transmitted by UMKC and MU instructors from their respective campuses.

COMM-ST 384 Documentary Film History Credits: 3

Documentary Film History is an overview of the history and theory of documentary cinema. The course surveys the documentary tradition with special attention to the relationship between content and style and the issues central to documentary film making, including ethical and legal questions, the relationship between representation and power and the ways in which film speaks to notions of truth and truth telling.

COMM-ST 385 Documentary Production Credits: 3

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basics of documentary production from an artistic, ethical, and practical results-oriented perspective.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 250.

COMM-ST 386 Animation Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to animation production techniques and an overview of the history of American animation arts. We will address both stop-motion and computer animation using industry standard software.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 250.

COMM-ST 387 Strategic Communication Research Credits: 3

This course will examine different research methods and research stages in advertising and public relations, including quantitative and qualitative research methods. Students will learn how to plan, conduct, and evaluate strategic communication research. Students are also expected to develop a greater appreciation for the role that research plays in effective campaigns.

COMM-ST 388 Media Ethics Credits: 3

This course is designed to sensitize the ethical considerations the underlie the conventions and practices of print, broadcast, and internet media. By placing traditional and new media in a wider intellectual context than is generally possible under the daily demands of producing news, information, and entertainment, it seeks to produce a larger sense of media as industry and as a career choice.

COMM-ST 390 Forensic Activities Credits: 1-4

Participation in the intercollegiate forensic program. A practicum in debate, discussion, oratory and other forensic activities.

COMM-ST 391 The World(s) Of Alfred Hitchcock Credits: 3

The course offers an historical study of the film art of Alfred Hitchcock. The course gives special attention to the director's work in the silent cinema of the U.K., Hitchcock's early major British sound films, his arrival in the United States, his major World War II propaganda films, the directors maturing into a major influence on world cinema in the 1940's, and Hitchcock's "masterworks" of the 1950's-1960's.

COMM-ST 392 Topics in World Cinema Credits: 3

A variable topics course focused on the histories and theories of international cinemas. Repeatable up to 6 hours when the topic changes.

COMM-ST 393 Topics in Sound & Cinema Credits: 3

A variable topics course that focuses on the histories and aesthetics of sound in cinema. Repeatable up to 6 hours when the topic changes.

COMM-ST 394 Topics in Gender and Cinema Credits: 3

A course focused on the relationship between popular culture, film history and the construction of gender and sexuality. Repeatable up to 6 hours when the topic changes.

COMM-ST 400 Special Studies Credits: 1-3

(A-N) This is an upper-level course on a subject which is not a part of the regular department offering. The course results from one or more of the following: (1) the expressed desire of students (2) the broadened or refocused scholarship of a member of the communication studies faculty (3) the temporary presence of a scholar whose specialization is not reflected in the department's regular offerings (4) the conclusion by the department that the course meets a community need (5) the effort of the Communication Studies faculty to provide an interdisciplinary approach to an era or topic.

COMM-ST 400G Special Studies In Communication Studies Credits: 1-3

COMM-ST 400M Special Studies In Communication Studies Credits: 1-6

COMM-ST 400N Special Studies Credits: 1-3

COMM-ST 400Q Special Studies In Communication Studies Credits: 1-3

COMM-ST 400W Special Studies in Communication Studies Credits: 1-3

COMM-ST 400Z Special Studies Credits: 1-3

COMM-ST 406CD CC: Film Adaptation Credits: 3

The class will explore the process of adapting both fiction and non-fiction literary works into motion pictures. Students will examine the original literary source, then the interim screenplay and finally the completed motion picture.

COMM-ST 411 Seminar in Film and Media Arts Credit: 1

This course covers special topics and professional practices within Film and Media Arts. Course is repeatable. Required of B.A. in Film and Media Arts majors for every semester enrolled. Enrollment restricted to declared majors, B.A. in Film and Media Arts.

Prerequisites: Declared major, B.A. in Film and Media Arts.

COMM-ST 426 History And Criticism Of American Public Address I Credits: 3

This course examines American Public Address from 1630 to 1900, with an emphasis on the connections between rhetoric and social change. Students analyze how texts function within specific historical contexts.

COMM-ST 428 History and Criticism of American Public Address II Credits: 3

This course examines American Public Address from 1900 to present, with an emphasis on the connections between rhetoric and social change. Students analyze how texts function within specific historical contexts.

COMM-ST 431 Colloquium In Interpersonal Dynamics Credits: 3

An examination of the practical application of communication principles and theories, with focus on one of the following: health, organizational, nonverbal, intrapersonal, conflict management, computer mediated, or intercultural communication.

COMM-ST 432 Press, Politics And Public Policy Credits: 3

An advanced course in the study of the press and political establishments in the formation of public policy.

COMM-ST 441 Applications of Interpersonal Communication Credits: 3

This course examines interpersonal communication theory as it pertains to a variety of interpersonal relationships. The course employs class discussions of theory and assignments that apply those theories to real life interactions.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 377 or COMM-ST 377WI.

COMM-ST 444WI Intercultural Communication Credits: 3

A consideration of communication phenomena in multicultural settings. A study of the public forum with an emphasis on the interpersonal aspects of international, intercultural, and co-cultural communication.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

COMM-ST 446 Principles Of Advertising Credits: 3

A survey of advertising as an industry and a career field, examining its history and development in America, and its application in mass and special media. Specific procedures are studies for linking the development of advertising strategies, messages and campaigns to the marketing process, and for evaluation and selection of appropriate media to carry the advertising message.

COMM-ST 447 Interactive and Social Media Advertising Credits: 3

This course examines advertising on the Internet as a form of interactive communication, with a special focus on social media and search engines. It addresses basic concepts, current issues, and the development of interactive advertising strategies and plans. The coverage includes interactivity, pricing models, online targeting strategies, search engine optimization and advertising, social media advertising, and online video advertising.

COMM-ST 448 Principles Of Public Relations Credits: 3

An overview, presenting the function, purposes, procedures and practices of public relations, its role in society, industry, government and politics, and its potential as a career field. This is a survey course with primary emphasis on theory, supplemented with applied techniques.

COMM-ST 454 Advanced Screenwriting Credits: 3

This course provides students with advanced theory in narrative screenwriting, training in industry standard script analysis (called "coverage") and story editing. Students will be required to draft, revise and workshop a short film screenplay or will focus on a feature screenplay, delivering a draft and revision of the first act and a detailed outline for the rest of the script. Students will workshop feature screenplays in small groups, emphasizing the art of constructive story editing.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 354.

COMM-ST 456 Electronic Journalism Credits: 3

A practical approach to the practices and principles of broadcasting news media, including preparing copy for microphone and camera, editing wire copy, reporting public affairs and public relations, and an intensive scrutiny of the concepts of freedom and responsibility as they apply to the press and current legislation.

COMM-ST 457 Client-Based Media Production Credits: 3

This course teaches the process of creating media for a professional client. Students will take on specialized crew positions and work together to plan, write, direct, shoot, edit, and distribute a short video for a local non-profit client.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 250.

COMM-ST 462 Public Broadcasting Credits: 3

A study of the development of public broadcasting, its position and responsibilities in the world of modern communications. Programming and operations concepts and philosophies of public broadcast facilities will be studied and analyzed.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 220.

COMM-ST 466 Advanced Electronic Journalism Credits: 3

An advanced study of television and Internet news gathering, field production and performance for electronic media.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 456.

COMM-ST 470 Directing Credits: 3

An advanced course in video techniques with emphasis on creating complex formats for broadcasting, recording and performance. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 250.

COMM-ST 471 Advanced Media Production Credits: 3

An advanced course in media production techniques focused on the creation of a significant individual media work and professional development.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 250, COMM-ST 373, and COMM-ST 354.

COMM-ST 473 Directing Actors and Scenes Credits: 3

This intensive workshop class seeks to deepen the student director's understanding of the acting process and provide ways of clearly and creatively communicating with actors. The course will deepen students' understanding of blocking scenes and designing camera coverage. It will explore the role of the director as a guiding creative force in the making of a film through collaboration and provide techniques for scene analysis and preparation. Students will cast, rehearse and present a live performance for their final project and design appropriate camera coverage.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 250.

COMM-ST 478 Media Law Credits: 3

A comprehensive examination of the law as it pertains to advertising, public relations, journalism, commercial and electronic media, broadcast regulatory agencies, corporate speech and corporate participation in elections. Students will study topics that include the First Amendment, defamation and privacy. Court opinions and legislation will be the course's primary focus, however students will also examine contemporary and historic theory of free expression.

COMM-ST 483 Research Seminar In Communication Studies Credits: 3

This is the departmental capstone course and is required for majors in their last semester of their senior year. The course summarizes and extends student's theoretical and applied understanding of the role of communication competence in the work place and beyond. The course also focuses on refining student's research competencies and their appreciation of the cultural role of modern communication methods.

COMM-ST 484 Communication Studies Activities Credits: 1-4

Internships opportunities for advanced students involved in community and campus activities. Student must receive approval of advising professor in semester prior to enrollment. No more than four hours with any one project.

COMM-ST 492 Advertising Campaigns Credits: 3

The course content focuses on branding, re-branding or development of an identity program, and combines advertising planning with creative execution. Students will learn how to develop advertising/marketing/creative campaign plans for a specific client(s), conceptualize, design and develop all creative aspects including but not limited to logo/identity, copy, advertising, website development, app design, etc., and complete a presentation of the plans/briefs and final creative developments of the plans/briefs and creative to the client(s).

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 446 or COMM-ST 447 or COMM-ST 387.

COMM-ST 498 Special Problems In Communication Studies Credits: 1-3

Research and/or projects for advanced upper class students. Student must receive approval of advising professor in semester prior to enrollment. No more than three hours with any one instructor.

COMM-ST 5554 Graduate Seminar: Screenwriting Credits: 3

Students will complete their feature screenplay, focusing on acts two and three and then ready the script for submission to contests and industry contacts. We will focus on in-depth scene work, polishing dialogue and deepening theme.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 454 or ENGLISH 429B.

COMM-ST 5597 Directed Graduate Studies: Readings Credits: 1-6

Special Projects on the graduate level.

COMM-ST 5598 Directed Graduate Studies: Non-Thesis Research Credits: 1-6

Special projects on the graduate level.

Economics Courses

ECON 100 Economics Explained Credits: 3

Everything you need to know about how the economy works and where it's going. This course simplifies and clarifies the vocabularies and concepts used to describe all the important economic phenomenon in our society today: unemployment, trade deficits, government budget deficits or surpluses, inflation, investments, and customer debt. It describes where we've been (economically) and assess the future of the economic system we call capitalism.

ECON 150 Introduction To Labor Studies Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course offered by The Institute for Labor Studies, covers the role of workers and the labor movement in society and the American political and economic system. Students will gain an overview, from a labor viewpoint, of the organization of work and workers, collective bargaining and representation, and labor's rights, roles, and strategies in a democracy and in the global economy. A particular focus will be the image of the working class and organized labor in the media and among public perception.

ECON 201 Introduction To Economics I Credits: 3

Economics I deals primarily with macroeconomic or national economic concepts, the economics of the determination of recession, inflation, maintenance of full employment and economic growth, with an emphasis upon the economics of modern Keynesian analyses. It further introduces the economics of Marx and Ayres and discusses relevant and current economic issues. ECON 201 and ECON 202 are prerequisites for most other economics courses.

ECON 201P Introduction To Economics I Credits: 3

Economics I deals primarily with macroeconomic or national economic concepts, the economics of the determination of recession, inflation, maintenance of full employment and economic growth, with an emphasis upon the economics of modern Keynesian analyses. It further introduces the economics of Marx and Ayres and discusses relevant and current economic issues. ECON 201 and ECON 202 are prerequisites for most other economics courses.

ECON 202 Introduction To Economics II Credits: 3

Economics II deals primarily with microeconomics, firm analysis, the principles of demand, supply, elasticity, price determination, costs, income distribution, market structures, trade, and other related social, economic issues. ECON 201 and ECON 202 are prerequisites for most other economics courses.

ECON 202P Introduction To Economics II Credits: 3

Economics II deals primarily with microeconomics, firm analysis, the principles of demand, supply, elasticity, price determination, costs, income distribution, market structures, trade, and other related social, economic issues. ECON 201 and ECON 202 are prerequisites for most other economics courses.

ECON 300CM Cluster Course: Mexico, Central America And The Human Condition Credits: 3

Faculty from at least two different departments (one of which must be a department in the Division of Humanities, including History) may determine the topic and syllabus, subject to the approval of the director of Integrated Studies and the program's advisory committee in addition to the approval of the departments involved. This special topics course will satisfy the interdisciplinary course requirement for the B.A.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 300CS Cluster Course Credits: 3

Faculty from at least two different departments (one of which must be a department in the Division of Humanities, including History) may determine the topic and syllabus, subject to the approval of the director of Integrated Studies and the program's advisory committee in addition to the approval of the departments involved. This special topics course will satisfy the interdisciplinary course requirement for the B.A.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 301 Macroeconomic Analysis Credits: 3

The economic system as a whole and the ways in which its functioning is affected by the behavior of the interdependent sectors of which it is composed. Major factors affecting national income; use of sectoral accounts in analyzing economic prospects.

Prerequisites: ECON 201.

ECON 301P Macroeconomic Analysis Credits: 3

The economic system as a whole and the ways in which its functioning is affected by the behavior of the interdependent sectors of which it is composed. Major factors affecting national income; use of sectoral accounts in analyzing general economic prospects.

Prerequisites: ECON 201.

ECON 302 Microeconomic Analysis Credits: 3

Functioning of the individual enterprise and households. Problems confronting business enterprises operating under different types of market situations; influence of the prices factors of production on methods of production; effects that changes in income levels and in relative prices have on sales of different types of goods and services.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 302P Microeconomic Analysis Credits: 3

Functioning of the individual enterprise and households. Problems confronting business enterprises operating under different types of market situations; influence of the prices factors of production on methods of production; effects that changes in income levels and in relative prices have on sales of different types of goods and services.

Prerequisites: ECON 202.

ECON 303H Special Issues In Economic Credits: 3

Readings and discussions of selected economic topics. Content varies over time as economic conditions change. Designed for outstanding students in Principles of Economics.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 308 Challenges Facing The US Economy Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to challenges facing the US economy, such as growing inequality and poverty in the midst of plenty, persistent unemployment in the central cities, the threat of recession or inflation, the problems and opportunities created by an aging society, implementation of welfare-to-work plans, and other topics of interest to students.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 314 Race, Class And Gender: Theory, History, And Policy Credits: 3

Analyzes the ways in which race and gender discrimination result in differences in opportunities and outcomes in society. Begins with a historical overview of the origins of modern racism and patriarchy, and their relation to the rise and development of capitalism. Discursive and nondiscursive factors are investigated. Alternative theoretical approaches to understanding the intersections of race, class, and gender are evaluated. Policy debates on issues related to affirmative action, education, welfare, employment, and others are considered.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 331 Money And Banking Credits: 3

A study of the structure, operations and problems of banks and other financial institutions with emphasis on their macroeconomic performance. The importance of banking in the financial system and the influence of Federal Reserve monetary policies are also studied.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 331P Money And Banking Credits: 3

A study of the structure, operations and problems of banks and other financial institutions with emphasis on their macroeconomic performance. The importance of banking in the financial system and the influence of Federal Reserve monetary policies are also studied.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 336 The Kansas City Economy Credits: 3

This course explores the Kansas City economy in depth from both a micro and macro perspective. The macro approach details how important the Kansas City economy is to the state of Missouri, to the US economy, and in the international arena. The micro approach details the contribution of the many different sectors of the KC area to the overall local economy.

Prerequisites: ECON 100, ECON 201 or ECON 202.

ECON 340 Collective Bargaining Credits: 3

This course involves a study of the economics and process of collective bargaining in the labor sphere, including contract negotiations, contract enforcement, and methods to resolve bargaining disputes. Both theoretical and applied issues in collective bargaining will be addressed. Students will participate in a contract bargaining simulation.

ECON 341 Union Leadership and Administration Credits: 3

This course focuses on the roles and challenges of union leadership in a changing environment. Topics include the union leaders' role as a representative, organizer and educator as well as administrative responsibilities within the union and the relationship with enterprise management in both adversarial and participatory situations. Options for leadership styles and organizational models will be discussed and explored in both theory and practice. Leaders will develop their skills of motivation, speaking, strategic planning and managing complex campaigns and diverse organizations.

ECON 353 Financial Analysis And The Economy Credits: 3

This course examines techniques of financial evaluation used by individuals, corporate managers, and portfolio analysts. Focus of the course will be on the interaction of the mechanics of analytical methods and economic activity. Topics covered will include individual portfolio building, asset evaluation, and financial market theory.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202.

ECON 395A Economic Issues Credit: 1

ECON 395C The Economics Of Energy Credit: 1

ECON 395D Economic Issues Credit: 1

ECON 402 Labor and the Global Political Economy Credits: 3

This course will examine current issues, trends, and developments which are shaping labor in today's global economy. Students will analyze the shifting balance of power between labor and capital, the role of government, and evaluate the strategic options for workers and unions operating in a global environment.

ECON 404R American Economic History Since 1865 Credits: 3

The course deals with the emergence of Industrial American since 1865. It covers the rise to dominance of the large modern corporation, the problem of economic and social instability and stability, the rise of trade associations, cartels, and government regulation in an unstable economy, and the evolution of American economic policy and national economic planning.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202.

ECON 404RR American Labor History Credits: 3

This course examines history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1750 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement , the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers' relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 366RR.

ECON 405 European Economic Systems Credits: 3

A general study of the economic systems of Germany, France, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Russia, and other countries: and the European Economic Union. The course will study the economic-business organization, economic and social policies, trade policies, and the on-going political, economic, and business changes within the area, and their relation to other areas of the world in terms of economics, business and trade.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 406WI History Of Economic Thought Credits: 3

Analysis of basic concepts of economic thought, their historical sources and significance.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

ECON 411 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Urban Economic Development Credits: 3

An advanced quantitative methods course featuring the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the problems of urban economic development. Surveys federal, state, and local geospatial and attribute data resources, including Census Bureau TIGER files, and provides training in geodatabase construction and management. Geospatial processing, editing, and address geocoding are also covered. Formal analytical methods (cartographic aesthetics and visualization, spatial analysis, exploratory data analysis, network analysis, crime analysis, etc.) are all applied in the context of the problematics of urban and regional economic development.

Prerequisites: GEOG 203 or UPD 203

ECON 412 International Trade And Development Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the global allocation of resources and distribution of income in the analysis of economic development and international trade. Major topics include various theories of economic development, comparative advantage, terms of trade, tariffs, quotas, economic integration and the use of trade to foster economic development.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 416 Law And Economics Credits: 3

This course will examine the use of economic principles in the analysis and application of public and private law. Emphasis will be given to the efficiencies of laws in meeting social objectives, how laws can be modified to become more economically efficient, and the uses of economics in the actual practice of the law. Issues covered will include proofs of liability in antitrust, contracts and employment law using statistical and economic analysis, and the calculation of economic damages in commercial, employment and personal injury/death litigation. Graduate students will be assigned a specific research paper.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 302.

ECON 420 Environment, Resources And Economic Growth Credits: 3

This course focuses on the theory and policy issues involved in resource receation and depletion; environmental destruction, preservation and receation; and the interrelation of these problems of and prospects for economic growth.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 421 Mathematical Economics Credits: 3

An introduction to mathematical methods as applied to the questions addressed by economists. The principal methods to be applied are matrix algebra and differential calculus in the context of optimization. Other topics may include integral calculus, differential equations, difference equations, or linear and non-linear programming.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 301, ECON 302 and MATH 210.

ECON 425 Intermediate Economic Statistics Credits: 3

An introduction to the empirical side of economics. Estimation theory and the properties of commonly used estimators are covered. Some of the more important topics dealt with are: multiple regression, heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation in regression analysis, analysis of variance and the use of qualitative variables in regression analysis. Hands-on work with computer software designed for econometrics is stressed. No experience with computers necessary.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 301, ECON 302 and STAT 235 (or its equivalent).

ECON 429 Environment, Resources And Economic Growth Credits: 3

This course focuses on the theory and policy issues involved in resource creation and depletion; environmental destruction, preservation and recreation; and the interrelation of these problems of and prospects for economic growth.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 431 Monetary Theory And Policy Credits: 3

A study of the nature and functions of money and the financial system, with emphasis on monetary theory and its application to current banking and financial problems. Recent contributions to monetary theory and current literature.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 301.

ECON 435 Public Finance Credits: 3

Problems of public and private sector decision making of revenue-expenditure policies and an examination of the actual legal, political and economic policies for revenues and expenditures of federal, state and local governments.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 302.

ECON 437 State And Local Government Finance Credits: 3

This course investigates the role, problems and relative importance of municipal governments in the United States. Such areas as the demand for public services, tax and expenditure policies, and intergovernmental fiscal relations will be explored in detail. Case studies of state and local governments will be introduced to emphasize the problems and proposed solutions arising in modern municipal governments.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 302.

ECON 438 Economic Policy Credits: 3

Analysis of the confluence of political and economic behavior, the economics of collective action.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 301 and ECON 302.

ECON 442 International Finance Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the global activity and balance of payments implications of government taxation, expenditure and monetary policies under various capital market conditions. Major topics include: exchange rates and the balance of payments; national income determination in an open economy; integrated and non-integrated capital markets; economic growth stabilization policies and the quest for global economic stability.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 301.

ECON 451 Institutional Economic Theory Credits: 3

Analysis of impact of modern philosophy and developments in social sciences on economic theory.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 301, ECON 302.

ECON 458 Urban Economics Credits: 3

An inquiry into the economics of location decisions and the influence of these on urban growth and on the real estate market; the evaluation of urban transportation and other public services; an examination of economic development of ghetto neighborhoods.

Prerequisites: ECON 202, ECON 302 (or equivalent).

ECON 460 Industrial Organization Credits: 3

The structure, conduct, and performance of American industry. Historical evolution of American industry; alternative industrial systems. Antitrust policies and their alternatives. Technological change and industrial performance.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 301, ECON 302.

ECON 475 Economics Institutions and Policies Credits: 3

This course focuses on the economic system analysis of labor market phenomena in the context of historical-institutional development and labor market policies, this course is offered winter semester only.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202.

ECON 486 Labor Economics Credits: 3

An examination of the theories of wage determination, the economic effects of wage determination upon the wage structure, the distribution of national income, employment, and an introduction to collective bargaining.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 302.

ECON 488 Radical Political Economy Credits: 3

This course will cover the ideas that constitute radical political economy. It will show how radical political economy can be used to examine current economics and social problems and will outline possible economic structures of utopian visions.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 490 Readings In Economics Credits: 1-3

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the professor in any of the following fields: (a) economic theory, (b) history of economic thought, (c) labor economics, (d) urban economics, (e) monetary and fiscal policy and theory, (f) international economics, (g) economic development. (h) comparative economic systems, (i) public finance, (j) public policy toward business, (k) quantitative economics.

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 496 Practicum in Urban Economic Development Credits: 3

The Practicum in Urban Economic Development provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply the knowledge and skills developed through previous coursework to real-world problems of urban economic development. Working on collaborative, service-learning projects in partnership with both community and metropolitan-level organizations, students will engage with the process of applied urban economic development in a team-structured context. Student teams will be each be responsible for one term project over the course of the semester. The course will culminate with the public presentation of project outcomes.

Prerequisites: ECON 336, ECON 458.

ECON 497 Internship Credits: 1-6

The course allows the student to participate in cognate, approved internships of a professional nature.

Prerequisites: The completion of 75 credit hours and undergraduate major or graduate student in Economics, ECON 201, ECON 202.

ECON 5501 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis Credits: 3

Basic theoretical concepts of national income and statistical tools utilized in its measurement. Aggregate demand and supply as problems of economic dynamics. The course includes examination of the primary competing theoretical approaches: neoclassical, Keynesian, new classical, real business cycle, new Keynesian supply side, Austrian, and Post Keynesian. Topics covered include growth, money, labor markets consumption, investment, expectations formation, role of time and uncertainty, equilibrium and disequilibrium analysis, exchanges rates, international trade. and optimal currency areas. Policy implications of the various macroeconomic theories are explored.

Prerequisites: ECON 301 and ECON 302 (or equivalent).

ECON 5502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis Credits: 3

The course first provides a critical survey of neoclassical microeconomic theory, including methodology, demand theory, production and cost theory, theory of competitive and non-competitive markets, distribution, welfare, and general equilibrium. It then introduces heterodox microeconomic theory, covering its historical origins, methodology, structural organization of economic activity, in-put-output models, flow of funds, agency and institutions, and the business enterprise.

Prerequisites: ECON 302, ECON 5521.

ECON 5503 Advanced Heterodox Economics Credits: 3

The course examines various theoretical approaches and topics, both historically and currently, that constitute heterodox economics. In particular the course deals in depth with the mathematical and economic properties of heterodox production and price models. After reviewing the mathematics of linear production-price models, the module will examine Leontief, Sraffian, and other heterodox price and production models.

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 302, and MATH 210.

ECON 5504R American Economic History Since 1865 Credits: 3

The course deals with the emergence of Industrial America since 1865. It will cover the rise to dominance of the large modern corporation, with the problem of economic and social instability and stability, with the rise of trade associations, cartels, and government regulation in an unstable economy, and with the evolution of American economic policy and national economic planning.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5566R.

ECON 5504RR American Labor History Credits: 3

This course examines the history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1750 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement, the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers' relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5566RR.

ECON 5505 Advanced Comparative Economic Systems Credits: 3

Contents vary depending upon the instructor's design for the course.

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 302.

ECON 5506 Advanced History Of Economic Thought Credits: 3

This seminar uses issues raised in the reading of two 'classic' primary texts, Adam Smith's An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776) and John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money (1936), as points of departure for the examination of a series of topics in the history and development of economics and alternative paradigms in the discipline. These investigations will lead us to the study of a number of other seminal articles, representing alternative approaches in the field. Topics include competition, accumulation, path dependence and endogenous technical change, cumulative causation, the laws of return, money and credit, capital theory, and more.

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 302.

ECON 5508 Controversial Issues In Recent Economic Literature Credits: 3

This course will focus on theoretical and policy-oriented controversies that have occurred in economic in the 20th century. The type of controversies covered include, but are not restricted to, money, unemployment, business cycles and economic growth, pricing and administered prices, capital controversy, labor theory of value controversy, and free trade vs. protectionism. While the course concentrates on recent debates, it identifies the origins of the modern disputes in earlier controversies. For each controversy, its real world importance and policy implications are discussed.

ECON 5511 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Urban Economic Development Credits: 3

An advanced quantitative methods course featuring the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the problems of urban economic development. Surveys federal, state, and local geospatial and attribute data resources, including Census Bureau TIGER files, and provides training in geodatabase construction and management. Geospatial processing, editing, and address geocoding are also covered. Formal analytical methods (cartographic aesthetics and visualization, spatial analysis, exploratory data analysis, network analysis, crime analysis, etc.) are all applied in the context of the problematics of urban and regional economic development.

Prerequisites: Geog 203 or UPD 203.

ECON 5512 Advanced Economic Development Credits: 3

Contents vary depending upon the instructor's design.

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 302.

ECON 5513 Economic Cycles And Growth Credits: 3

A critical review and evaluation of economic analysis and the forces of economic fluctuation and growth; and analysis of statics, dynamics, monopolistic competition, the role of the interrelationships of the market structure and other institutional forces as they relate to fluctuations and growth. An emphasis will be made on the critical evaluation of recent literature in the field of economic analysis related to fluctuations, growth, statics, dynamics, market structure and the reinterpretation of economic fluctuations, growth, forecasting and overall economic behavior. An analysis of the technological, monetary, and fiscal policy implied by economic trends and growth will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: ECON 5501 or equivalent.

ECON 5516L Law And Economics Credits: 3

This course will examine the use of economic principles in the analysis and applications of public and private law. Emphasis will be given to the efficiencies of laws in meeting social objectives, how laws can be modified to become more economically efficient, and the uses of economics in the actual practice of the law. Issues covered will include proofs of liability in antitrust, contracts and employment law using statistical and economic analysis, and the calculation of economic damages in commercial, employment and personal injury/death litigation.. Graduate students will be assigned a specific research paper..

Prerequisites: ECON 302.

ECON 5521 Mathematical Economics Credits: 3

An introduction to mathematical methods as applied to the questions addressed by economists. The principal methods to be applied are matrix algebra and differential calculus in the context of optimization. Other topics may include integral calculus, differential equations, difference equations or linear and nonlinear programming.

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 302 and MATH 110 (or equivalent).

ECON 5525 Econometric Methods Credits: 3

Continuation of ECON 425. The major problems encountered in building and testing economic models are treated and alternative solutions to these problems are discussed. Major topics include corrections for heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation, maximum likelihood and BLUE estimation, simultaneous equations methods, probit and logit analysis and distributed lags. Other topics may include ARIMA or other series analytic methods, three stage least squares and dynamic multipliers or simulation. Work with econometric software is stressed. No programming experience necessary.

Prerequisites: ECON 425 (or equivalent) and ECON 5521.

ECON 5529 Readings In Quantitative Economics Credits: 3

Readings from the economic literature which stress advanced mathematical or econometric tools. A general subject matter is selected by the student with the consent of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ECON 5521, ECON 5525.

ECON 5531 Monetary Theory And Policy Credits: 3

A study of the nature and functions of money and the financial system, with emphasis on monetary theory and its application to current banking and financial problems; recent contributions to monetary theory and current literature.

Prerequisites: ECON 301.

ECON 5535 Theory Of Public Finance Credits: 3

An inquiry into the scope and nature of economics with emphasis on the nature of the public sector including a brief study of welfare criteria along with the study of ability to pay, benefit theory of taxation, and expenditure theories.

ECON 5537 State And Local Government Finance Credits: 3

This course investigates the role, problems and relative importance of municipal governments in the United States. Such areas as the demand for public services, tax and expenditure policies, and intergovernmental fiscal relations will be explored in detail. Case studies of state and local governments will be introduced to emphasize the problems and proposed solutions arising in modern municipal governments.

Prerequisites: ECON 302.

ECON 5538 Economic Policy Credits: 3

Analysis of the confluence of political and economic behavior, the economics of collective action.

Prerequisites: ECON 301 and ECON 302.

ECON 5540 Advanced International Trade Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the global allocation of resources and distribution of income under various commodity market conditions and government trade policies. Major topics include: comparative advantage; terms of trade; the distribution of gains and losses from trade; perfect vs. imperfect competition; tariffs, quotas and other barriers to trade; exchange rates and the balance of payments; preferential trading arrangements; international factor movements and multinational corporations.

Prerequisites: ECON 302 (or equivalent); graduate standing.

ECON 5542 Advanced International Finance Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the global activity and balance of payments implications of government taxation, expenditure and monetary policies under various capital market conditions. Major topics include: exchange rates and the balance of payments; national income determination in an open economy; integrated and non-integrated capital markets; economic growth, stabilization policies and the quest for global economic stability.

ECON 5548 Advanced Socialist Economic Systems Credits: 3

The course will deal with the theoretical analysis of socialist economic theory, Marxian and non-Marxian, and/or of socialist economics systems such as those of Eastern Europe, the Chinese mainland and elsewhere. The emphasis of the course will vary depending upon the instructor's design for the course.

Prerequisites: ECON 301 and ECON 302.

ECON 5550 Regional Economics Credits: 3

The economics of spatial relations, emphasizing basic location and land utilization theory and the role of transport will be considered at the micro-level. Keynesian and neoclassical growth theories and contemporary policy approaches to regional growth and decline are analyzed.

Prerequisites: ECON 302.

ECON 5551 Advanced Institutional Theory Credits: 3

Evolution, organization and allocation functions of the modern industrial economy. Contributions and limitations of conventional economic concepts. Philosophical and theoretical interpretations of the economy in light of modern developments in philosophy and social science.

Prerequisites: ECON 451.

ECON 5558 Advanced Urban Economics Credits: 3

The study of the city as a dynamic system of interrelated and interdependent markets. Significant markets in cities include land, housing, labor, transportation and public services.

ECON 5560 Industrial Organization Credits: 3

The structure, conduct and performance of American industry. Historical evolution of American industry; alternative industrial systems, antitrust policies and their alternatives. Technological change and industrial performance.

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 302.

ECON 5575 Labor Economics, Institutions and Policies Credits: 3

This course focuses on the economic analysis of labor market phenomena in the context of historical-institutional development and on labor market policies. This course is offered winter semester only.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202.

ECON 5583 Racial Inequality & Public Policy Credits: 3

This course will provoke open debate and discourse about public policy responses to racial inequality. The emphasis is on stimulating participants to think about and to analyze critically the range of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial economic inequality.

ECON 5587 Human Resource Economics Credits: 3

An analysis of the factors determining the productivity of human resource: education, nutrition, job training and work environment. An analysis of work patterns, wage patterns, and the impact of automation. Graduate students will be assigned a specific research paper on a topic to be decided with the instructor.

Prerequisites: ECON 302.

Cross Listings: ECON 487.

ECON 5588 Advanced Political Economy Credits: 3

This course gives students a comprehensive introduction to the history and modern practice of political economy, with particular emphasis on Marxian and Classical political economy. Topics include: value theory, class theory, economic reproduction, economic crisis, the theory of history, and methodology.

Prerequisites: ECON 5521.

ECON 5589 Graduate Seminar In Labor Economics Credits: 3

Content of seminar will vary from semester to semester depending upon the instructor's design for the course.

Prerequisites: ECON 486.

ECON 5590 Special Topics Credits: 1-3

Selected topics in theoretical and applied economics.

ECON 5590A Special Topics Credits: 1-3

ECON 5590B Special Topics Credits: 1-3

ECON 5590C Special Topics Credits: 1-3

ECON 5591 Research And Planning Seminar Credits: 3

The objective of this research seminar is to apply the quantitative techniques and theoretical constructs of economics to an urban-regional problem. Students are required to formulate and evaluate present economic models, and then complete a research project.

Prerequisites: ECON 5502 and ECON 5521.

ECON 5599 Research And Thesis Credits: 1-6

Directed specialized research.

ECON 5601 Colloquium In Advanced Macroeconomics Credits: 3

The course will deal with analyses of topics in Macroeconomic analysis and Macroeconomic policies and investigation of current literature in divers areas of Macroeconomic analysis. A written report(s) will be made upon the selected assignment(s).

Prerequisites: ECON 5501 or equivalent.

ECON 5602 Colloquium In Advanced Microeconomics Credits: 3

As a continuation of Economics 502, this course deals with the business enterprises-including production, costs, pricing, and investment-markets, market demand, market governance, general price-quantity models of the economy, microfoundations of the heterodox macroeconomics, and social welfare.

Prerequisites: ECON 5502.

ECON 5606 Colloquium on Advanced History of Economic Thought Credits: 3

The course examines advanced topics in history of economic thought.

Prerequisites: ECON 5506.

ECON 5608 Topics In Economic Theory Credits: 3

This course deals with advanced topics in Institutionalism, Post Keynesian, and other heterodox economic theory. May be repeated with different topic.

ECON 5616 History Of Economics In The 20th Century Credits: 3

The history of 20th century economics is concerned with a number of interdependent issues, including the institutional organization of economics at universities; the historical development of the structures and social networks that make-up the economic paradigms of neoclassical economics, Marxian economics, Post Keynesian economics, and other heterodox economics; and the role of institutional and state power to maintain the dominance of the neoclassical paradigm. The aim of the course is to introduce students to this institutional/organizational history.

ECON 5625 Colloquium In Econometrics Credits: 3

This course treats advanced topics in econometrics such as non-linear estimation techniques, model development, simultaneous equation estimation techniques, and simulation. Topics are developed from theoretical and application perspectives. Familiarity with personal computer is necessary.

Prerequisites: ECON 5501, ECON 5502, ECON 5521, ECON 5525, or equivalents.

ECON 5631 Colloquium on Monetary Theory and Policy Credits: 3

This course explores advanced monetary theory and policy, examining recent debates and current research practices, as well as classic articles on monetary theory and policy.

Prerequisites: ECON 5601 or ECON 5501 and ECON 5531.

ECON 5645 Financial Macroeconomics Credits: 3

This course will introduce the student to the central role of financial analysis in macroeconomic analysis and to theories of macroeconomics instability based on the integration of finance and macroeconomics. It will examine modern finance theory and modern approaches to financial analysis, paying particular attention to the contributions made by Fisher and Keynes.

ECON 5660 Evolution Of American Industrial Society Credits: 3

Drawing on economic and organizational theory, the course will concentrate on the evolution of American industrial technology, the American business enterprise, and the organization of American industries and markets since 1870.

ECON 5665 Colloquium In Advanced Health Economics Credits: 3

This course is designed as a seminar with a special emphasis on analysis of econometric methods to assess issues in health care. The topics are developed from a theoretical and applied perspective. Familiarity with personal computers is necessary. Special emphasis will be given in the selection of course topics to the interests and backgrounds of participants.

Prerequisites: ECON 5521, ECON 5525, ECON 5565, or equivalents.

ECON 5680 Teaching Methods And Course Design Credits: 3

This course is designed to prepare students for the challenge of teaching economics. Students will be taught how to write a syllabus; how to prepare for class; how to plan learning activities; how to become skillful in leading discussion; how to present an effective lecture; how to test and assess student learning; how to develop effective group projects; how to motivate their students for lifelong learning. Students will be required to design a course to be taught at the 200-, 300 or 400-level. The student will prepare a complete set of course materials, including a lecture outline, a list of require readings, useful handouts, course materials, including a lecture outline, a list of require readings, useful handouts, course assignments, exams, etc. The course should incorporate an interdisciplinary approach and should emphasize an "active learning" component, designed to promote a "rich learning experience." The student will work closely with an appropriate member of the faculty.

Prerequisites: Must have completed/passed Comprehensive Exams.

ECON 5688 Colloquium On Political Economy Credits: 3

This course is designed as a seminar and will take into account theory and policy analysis from alternative perspectives. The topics covered will include philosophical foundations of contemporary theory and policy, the organization of production information and finance, resource and environment, wealth and income distribution, public and private policy and planning. Stress is placed on contemporary research and students are expected to become involved in research projects.

ECON 5690 Special Doctoral Readings In Economics Credits: 1-3

Special research topics in Economics at the Doctoral level.

ECON 5699 Doctoral Dissertation Credits: 1-12

Directed selected research for Economics in the interdisciplinary doctoral program.

ECON 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

English Courses

ENGLISH 100B Basic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of speaking and listening for survival-level social functions in English. Frequent exercises focus on the production of isolated words and phrases in areas of need, and on the development of survival level oral/aural skills for beginning ESL students. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100C Basic Reading and Vocabulary for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of survival-level reading English vocabulary in context. Frequent exercises focus on basic reading comprehension related to familiar topics and situations, and the introduction of dictionary skills. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100D Basic Writing for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of survival level writing skills including spelling, capitalization and some punctuation. Introduction of basic sentence structures and completion of simple standard forms of written English. Frequent exercises focus on survival level writing such as words and basic phrases in the present tense. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100G Basic Grammar for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of survival level sentence structures and words. Frequent exercises focus on basic level sentences, questions, directions, and descriptions in the present tense that relate to students' immediate surroundings and some life skills areas. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100S Special Topics in English as a Second Language Credits: 1-6

A course designed to address the specific needs of an individual student or group of students studying English as a Second Language. In addition to targeting English skills, the course may address topics or skills which are not covered in the standard Academic English curriculum of the Applied Language Institute. This course will accommodate individual students or groups of students studying at the Institute for periods of time other than the standard semester length. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 100T TOEFL Preparation Credits: 1-3

This course will prepare students to take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), in either the paper-based (PBT) or internet-based (iBT) form, and/or to improve their scores from previous attempts. Exercises focus on developing the skills and strategies necessary for navigating TOEFL questions while continuing to develop the general English language skills that support success on the TOEFL. The course will provide students with a personal awareness of strengths and weaknesses so they may focus their test preparation work in and outside of class. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101B Academic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers I Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of speaking and listening for basic social functions in English. Exercises include the practice of basic descriptions and the development of oral/aural skills for beginning ESL students. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101C Academic Reading and Vocabulary for Non-Native Speakers I Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of reading with basic English vocabulary in context. Exercises focus on reading comprehension, identifying the topics of short readings, and the introduction of basic dictionary skills. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101D Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers I Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of basic writing skills including handwriting, spelling, capitalization and punctuation. Frequent short exercises emphasize basic sentence structure, biographical description, and completion of standard forms. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 101G Academic Grammar for Non-Native Speakers I Credits: 1-3

The study and practical application of basic sentence structure and word parts. Frequent exercises emphasize use and understanding of simple sentences, questions, directions, and descriptions in the present and past tenses. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 102B Academic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers II Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of speech in environments such as the classroom, work, and simple social occasions. Exercises focus on student's ability to distinguish sounds and to produce them correctly in the context of a sentence and to listen for specific information. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 102C Academic Reading and Vocabulary for Non-Native Speakers II Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of reading narrative and expository texts and standard forms. Exercises focus on the development of vocabulary and introduction of reading techniques such as identification of topics and main ideas, skimming, scanning, prediction, and inference. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Science.

ENGLISH 102D Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers II Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of techniques for writing short paragraphs in English. Frequent exercises emphasize various forms of paragraph organization and the improvement of punctuation and mechanical skills in writing. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 102G Academic Grammar for Non-Native Speakers II Credits: 1-3

The study and practical application of basic sentence structures, including future and irregular past tense constructions. Frequent exercises emphasize use and understanding of comparatives, questions, and compound nouns and verbs. This course carried no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103B Academic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers III Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of listening for and producing speech in the past, present and future tenses. Exercises introduce note-taking techniques and focus on the ability to hear and express abstract ideas. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103C Academic Reading and Vocabulary for Non-Native Speakers III Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of longer reading passages of various rhetorical styles. Exercises focus on improvement of reading speed and the development of vocabulary and comprehension through complex inferences. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103D Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers III Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of writing multi-paragraph academic essays. Frequent exercises emphasize point-of-view, process writing, and a variety of rhetorical styles. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 103G Academic Grammar for Non-Native Speakers III Credits: 1-3

The study and practical application of complex sentence structures, including perfect and perfect progressive tenses. Frequent exercises emphasize use and understanding of passive voice, gerunds and infinitives, articles, conditionals, and modals. The course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 104B Academic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers IV Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of standard English, particularly in the college classroom. Exercises include training in academic lecture comprehension and note-taking as well as formal (classroom presentation) and informal (conversation) English speaking. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 104C Advanced Academic English Reading For Non-Native Speakers IV Credits: 1-3

This course focuses on preparing students to deal effectively with sophisticated academic reading materials by guiding them in the development of a conscious and reflective approach toward reading. It emphasizes advanced reading skills of interpretation, inference, critical analysis, evaluation and application. There will be frequent exercises addressing the acquisition and practice of study skills and collaborative academic work.

ENGLISH 104D Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers IV Credits: 1-3

The study and practice of rhetorical principles in standard English prose. Frequent writing exercises emphasize critical thinking and research skills as well as fluency and accuracy in academic writing. This course carries no credit toward graduation in the College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH 104G Advanced Academic English Grammar For Non-Native Speakers IV Credits: 1-3

This course focuses on the analytical understanding and application of English grammar. Students will be expected to observe usage patterns of the English language in a combination of both normative and prescriptive grammars appropriate for academic English application. There will be frequent exercises emphasizing mastery of complex grammar structures including all verb tenses, dependent clauses, modals, and unreal conditionals, and of the relationship between ideas and the construction of sentences in academic discourse.

ENGLISH 105B Advanced Speaking and Listening Topics for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

This course focuses on developing high-level fluency in English listening and speaking through critical awareness of social language use. Students will work toward greater speaking and listening fluency and adaptability through the practice of skills involving purpose, audience, speech norms and context.

ENGLISH 105C Advanced Reading and Vocabulary Topics for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

In this course, advanced ESL readers will develop the core critical reading skills required for success in academics by examining and applying those skills in the context of authentic college-level readings representing a wide variety of genres and modes. Readings will include extensive college textbook passages, newspaper articles, opinion sections, academic essays and interpretive reading of literature.

ENGLISH 105D Advanced Writing Topics for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

This course engages advanced ESL and EFL writers to develop greater dexterity of expression in composition. In addition to reinforcing core rhetorical skills, grammar and writing mechanics, students will explore new rhetorical styles such as personal responses, autobiographical essays, and writing about literature. Extensive reading complements the writing discussion and practice with pieces including personal and academic essays, narrative, magazine journalism and fiction.

ENGLISH 105G Advanced Grammar Topics for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 1-3

In this course, students will pursue an in-depth comprehension of English grammar, with a strong focus on increasing fluency in the English language through a critical analysis of connotation and pragmatics and their role in language fluency. Contextual readings, film and native conversation passages will complement the grammar discussions and practice, engaging students to move beyond a literal understanding based on syntax and semantics to a more contextual awareness of English form and function.

ENGLISH 110 English I: Introduction To Academic Prose Credits: 3

This course introduces students to college-level reading, writing, and discourse analysis: it engages students in the analysis and creation of texts that reveal multiple perspectives about specific rhetorical situations and cultural issues. In addition to learning how to revise by analyzing their own writing, students will learn to edit their own work and use proper academic documentation.

ENGLISH 119 Myth and Literature Credits: 3

A study of classical myth including readings from Homer to Ovid, analysis of selected myths in later literature, art, and music, and a study of contemporary definitions and approaches to myth.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 119.

ENGLISH 120 Literary Monstrosities Credits: 3

This course explores representations of monsters in literature. Students are introduced to different ways of thinking about monstrosities from a range of cultural and historical perspectives, as well as through a variety of materials in order to approach this question from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 120.

ENGLISH 123 True Lives: Autobiographical Arts and Acts Credits: 3

This course explores life writing and other autobiographical practices. Students will read and analyze a variety of life writing forms and think critically about life writing in various cultural, historical, and social contexts. They will also examine autobiography as a form of self-expression, as an articulation of personal and social values, as a public art, and as a way to study human experience in different contexts. Genres may include memoir, autobiography, diaries, etc., at the discretion of the instructor.

ENGLISH 124 Writing About Literature Credits: 3

This course is designed to be taken either prior to or concurrent with a student's first literature course. It introduces students to literary criticism in its broadest, most generic sense, as a stylized response to reading. Students in the course will be introduced to different approaches to writing about literature, to methods of generating ideas, and focusing and developing a topic.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110 or equivalent.

ENGLISH 126 Popular Literature Credits: 3

This course is designed to help students develop a fuller understanding of the human condition by exploring a range of accessible, bestselling fiction and non-fiction from a variety of periods and places, historic and contemporary. The course may include popular stories, songs and ballads, the scripts of blockbuster plays and films, best-selling novels, and widely distributed nonfictional prose.

ENGLISH 130 Introduction to Human Language Credits: 3

This course examines the biological and cultural properties of human language and it provides a foundation for understanding the role language plays in personal lives, in social institutions, and in the literary arts.

ENGLISH 141 Women and Literary Culture/The Heroine in Literature Credits: 3

This course explores the role of the heroine in literature. Students will examine how the heroine is crafted by a variety of writers and think critically about the role of the heroine in various cultural, historical, and social contexts. Genres may include science fiction/fantasy, mystery, romance, etc. at the discretion of the instructor.

ENGLISH 200 Introduction To Undergraduate Study In English Credits: 3

An investigation of reading, writing, and research practices associated with studies in English. Students will learn about multiple forms, genres, and critical approaches, as well as encounter texts from various historical periods and places. Required of all English majors before enrolling in 400-level ENGLISH courses.

ENGLISH 203 Introduction to Journalism Credits: 3

Introduction to the styles and techniques of reporting and writing basic news through assignments in straight news, features and in-depth stories. Exposure to the history and principles of American journalism. Practical application in writing news and news feature articles.

ENGLISH 207 World Literature in English Credits: 3

This course helps students develop a fuller understanding of the human condition by exploring accessible literary texts in English by non Euro-American writers. The course provides historical, economic and political contexts and is designed for students who enjoy learning about global cultures by reading and discussing a diverse range of bestselling literature.

ENGLISH 213 Introduction To Drama Credits: 2-3

Beginning with an intensive study of a few plays analyzed to elicit general principles, the course moves on to consider several representative examples of each of the major periods and types of Western drama, from the Greeks to the present.

ENGLISH 214 Introduction To Fiction Credits: 3

Students will be introduced to the study of fiction as a literary art form. Students will continue to develop their understanding of fiction-writing in preparation for more advanced courses in literature and creative writing. Coursework will focus on close reading of short and long forms of fiction selected from a range of literary periods and world literature. Students are expected to interpret and analyze various forms of fiction and write critically about the role of fiction as a form of cultural discourse.

ENGLISH 215 Introduction To Poetry Credits: 3

An introduction to the study of poetry for students desiring a basic course either to develop a greater appreciation of poetry or to prepare for more advanced courses in literature or creative writing. Class discussions will focus on close readings of poems and analysis of poetic techniques. Writing assignments will complement reading and class discussion and will enable students to develop their own critical and creative skills.

ENGLISH 216 The Craft of Creative Writing Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the key techniques that writers of imaginative literature use. Students will develop skills at writing and reading in multiple genres.

Prerequisites: DISC 100.

ENGLISH 218 Introduction to Ethnic Studies Credits: 3

An interdisciplinary course that uses a comparative perspective to examine the history, social issues, and cultural productions of African Americans, Arab Americans, Asian Americans, Latina/os, and Native Americans. Students will be introduced to key concepts and methods used in the study of race in an American context.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites:DISC 200.

Cross Listings: LLS 218.

ENGLISH 225 English II: Intermediate Academic Prose Credits: 3

This course extends the work of ENGLISH 110 with an additional emphasis on research. Each section of ENGLISH 225 uses a combination of book-length and shorter texts on focus on specific historical and/or cultural issues. As they learn to participate in scholarly conversations, students will find and evaluate library and internet sources. As with ENGLISH 110, this course emphasizes revision, editing, and proper academic documentation. ENGLISH 225 or equivalent is a prerequisite for all 300 and 400 level ENGLISH courses.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110 and sophomore standing.

ENGLISH 241 Women And Literary Culture: Introduction Credits: 3

The course offers an introduction to women as producers and consumers of literature. Students will become acquainted with women writers, explore women's reading practices, and interrogate the issues that have surrounded women's participation in cultural arenas.

ENGLISH 242 Women Writing/Women Reading Credits: 3

This course investigates women as producers and consumers of literature. Students will become acquainted with diverse women writers, explore women's reading practices, and interrogate the cultural, historical, and social contexts that influence women's writing and reading.

Prerequisites: Anchor I and DISC 100 or equivalents.

ENGLISH 250 Introduction to Language Acquisition and Diversity Credits: 3

Investigation of the basic principles of first and second language acquisition. Topics addressed include language competency, socio-cultural factors in language, dialects, acquisitional principles, and language diversity. Students will take part in monitored classroom observations in public schools, and will critically analyze how the topics addressed in class apply to real life and to teaching situations.

ENGLISH 270 Writing Tutor Training Seminar Credits: 3

This course covers the basics of serving as a tutor for writers. Students acquire hands-on experience in consulting with writers at all stages of the writing process, including invention work, drafting, revising, documenting, and editing. Students will also become conversant in theories of peer tutoring and research on Writing Centers.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110.

ENGLISH 273 Science Fiction Credits: 3

This course focuses on a range of science fiction texts from a variety of periods and traditions. Students will examine the relationship between different types of science fiction from various periods and the related social, economic, and political contexts.

Prerequisites: DISC 100.

ENGLISH 278 Asian American Literature Credits: 3

This course examines literary and cultural texts produced by Asian Americans from the nineteenth century to the present. Texts will be drawn from a variety of genres and from several Asian American groups in order to examine how Asian American literature engages, challenges, revises, and reinvents American literary traditions. The course will identify and explore specific cultural and political issues that have shaped the writings, including trans-nationalism, immigration, racial identity, group identity, and community. Authors may include Carlos Bulosan, Maxine Hong Kingston, John Okada, Bienvendo Santos, and Hisaye Yamamoto.

Prerequisites: DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CB Cluster Course: Women In The Ancient World Credits: 3

This course focuses on the history, representation, literature, social lives, and political roles of women in ancient civilization including Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Biblical World, Greece, and Rome. It integrates methodologies from history, art history and archaeology, literary studies, and women's studies.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 300CB.

ENGLISH 300CD Cluster Course: American Social Film:Silver Screen&American Dream Credits: 3

This course will combine American social history and film history in the sound era. Using Hollywood entertainment films, the course will look at Hollywood as an indicator of social, political and economic conditions in the United States since the 1930s. The main topics are representations of the American dream and nightmare, poverty and affluence, success and failure. This course is offered as a cluster with HISTORY 400CP.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5583.

ENGLISH 300CE Cluster Course: Radical Changes Since 1945 Credits: 3

This cluster will focus on modernism, post-modernism and expressionism in the visual arts and literature since World War II. Common lectures will address intellectual movements-such as existentialism and formalism--and cultural development--such as the increased impact of technology and mass media--in contemporary society. By focusing on these movements, the cluster course hopes to provide an integrated view of the literature and visual arts of the period and to draw upon analogous developments in contemporary architecture, music, philosophy and film.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CN Cluster Course: Terrorism, Civil War And Trauma Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course examines the modern experience of terrorism and civil war in the light of art, film, history, literature, and philosophy. It explores a number of traumatic events, historic and contemporary, challenging us to think about such contemporary issues as violence and identity formation, civil rights and state-sponsored terrorism, pacifism and patriotism, resistance and collaboration, fundamentalism and fascism, neo-colonialism and anti-imperialism.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CQ Cluster Course: Race in American Film Credits: 3

This course examines representations of race and ethnicity in American film from the silent era onward in mainstream and countercultural traditions. It explores how social, political, and economic conditions contribute to constructions of race and ethnicity. This course is offered as a cluster course with HISTORY 300CF.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CW Cluster Course: Critical Issues in Women's & Gender Studies Credits: 3

This class is an interdisciplinary upper-level course that will examine critical issues in women's and gender studies by focusing on the intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, and social context. Through their study of these intersections, students will be more sensitive to the impact of social structures on gender and the experiences of women and men.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CX Empire (Cluster Course) Credits: 3

This is an interdisciplinary, team-taught course designed to teach students ways to think about the complexities of human cultures, past and present, helping them examine how imperialism continues to shape contemporary understandings of personal, institutional, and cultural identities (both of selves and others). The course engages students in the analysis of global cultures with a focus on the economic, environmental, political and social consequences of specific imperial regimes and the ongoing impact of these regimes on particular groups that continue to live with the legacies of empire.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 OR DISC 200.

ENGLISH 300CY Cluster Course: Ancient World/Cinema Credits: 3

This course will explore the tradition of depicting the ancient Mediterranean world in film from the early silent era to the present. Topics to be covered include the ways that filmmakers respond to literary and historical sources from the ancient world, interact with the artistic tradition of films about the ancient world, the relation of these films to other works by the same creative personnel (directors, actors, writers, producers, etc.), and the political and cultural contexts in which the films were released.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 300CY, COMM-ST 300CY, HISTORY 400CY.

ENGLISH 300F SS:Academic English/International Grad Teaching Assistants Credits: 3

The study and practice of standard spoken English combined with the study and practice of classroom teaching techniques. Exercises focusing on improvement of pronunciation, and formal (classroom presentation) and informal (conversation) English speaking are combined with techniques for lecture organization, strategies for clear content presentation, and with analysis of the American post-secondary educational culture. This course is designed for prospective International Graduate Teaching Assistants who need to improve their English communication skills and obtain an understanding of American educational culture.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 301WI Writing And The Academy Credits: 3

This course examines social and ethical issues raised by academic reading and writing. While some attention is paid to the formal aspects of academic prose within specific disciplines, the main emphasis of the course is on the cultural consequences of the different ways that academic knowledge is created and taught. In addition to studying the language and structure of academic reading and writing, the course explores the various rhetorics of the academy in terms of a broad range of subjects including economics, gender, education, history, and myth. This course satisfies the junior-level writing requirement and counts towards the writing minor.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 304WI Workplace Writing Credits: 3

This writing intensive course focuses on the rhetorical principles of workplace communication, providing students with opportunities to analyze complex rhetorical situations, to study various workplace genres, and to compose texts that meet the needs of diverse stakeholders.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 305WI Theory And Practice Of Composition Credits: 3

A course in expository writing that will include reading on composition theory and the nature of literacy. Frequent short essays and a long paper.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 306WI Advanced Composition Credits: 3

(Formerly English 202). Further study of writing for those who wish to continue the study beyond the two semesters of composition. Emphasis will be placed on translating critical thinking into effective writing. (NOTE: Students may not receive credit for more than one of the following: 305, 306, 403). Required of business and public administration majors.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 307WI Language, Literacy, Power Credits: 3

This course uses discourse analysis to investigate language and literacy. Students will explore how the discourses of institutional and cultural identities act as instruments of power and legitimacy.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 308 Rhetorics of New Media Credits: 3

This course will focus on the rhetorical study of new media texts (such as hypertext, networked multimedia, multimedia art and performance, virtual spaces, and so on) and theories of new media. The course will consider the rhetorical possibilities and constraints of new media and critically examine their impact on democratic discourse and literacy in the public sphere. Specialized knowledge of multimedia equipment and software is neither expected nor required.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 309WI Rhetorics of Public Memory Credits: 3

This course explores how museums and other cultural institutions function as rhetorical agents in creating and preserving public memory. Students will explore how processes of collection, arrangement, and visual display operate as modes of persuasion and make arguments about civic identities and community values.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 310 Introduction To Linguistics/Language Science Credits: 3

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the theory, methodology, and applications of the science of language. It examines properties of human language, covers all branches of language science, and provides a foundation for a critical understanding of language issues. Required for ENGLISH 470; recommended for ENGLISH 320 and ENGLISH 330.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 311 American Literature I Credits: 3

A survey of American literature and culture from its beginnings to 1865. This course will cover a range of authors, several genres, and culture forms, which may include fiction, poetry, drama, autobiography, oral, contact and/or slave narratives, folklore, and songs.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 312 Creative Writing I Fiction Credits: 3

A course centered on the short story. Emphasis is placed on three areas: general principles governing the writing of fiction; practice in short fiction (primarily the short story, but including the novella); criticism; and technical skills (including editing and rewriting).

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

Co-requisites: ENGLISH 213 or ENGLISH 214.

ENGLISH 313WI Reporting Credits: 3

A seminar of practical application in advanced reporting. Assignments to cover news events and to pursue in-depth news reports on the campus and off.

Prerequisites: COMM-ST 203 or ENGLISH 203; RooWriter.

ENGLISH 315 Creative Writing Poetry Credits: 3

Writing and rewriting poems, with discussion of techniques needed to produce desired effects. Analysis and evaluation of student work. Examination of technical means utilized in selected poems by accomplished poets.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

Co-requisites: ENGLISH 215.

ENGLISH 316WI Literary Nonfiction Credits: 3

Literary Nonfiction is a writing intensive course in the reading and writing of nonfiction prose as a literary art. We'll survey the historical development of literary nonfiction (especially the essay), sample contemporary authors of the genre, write critical commentary on works we read, and compose personal essays of our own. The course is not exclusively a literary seminar nor a creative writing workshop, but seeks to mix and make connections between these modes, in the tradition of the essay itself.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 317 British Literature I Credits: 3

A survey of British Literature and culture from its beginnings to the 18th century, including works by Chaucer and Milton.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 318 Bible As Literature Credits: 3

A critical study of the major portions of the Old and New Testaments and the Apocrypha, with special attention to the development of literature from oral tradition, the literary genres, themes and archetypes represented in the collection, and the diction and style which have influenced later literature. Consideration also of the relation of Biblical literature to the historical, religious, and cultural milieu of the ancient Near East.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 320 Structure Of English Credits: 3

Not a remedial grammar course. Methods of linguistic inquiry and grammatical description. Study of traditional and modern schools of syntax, especially transformational grammar. Practice describing the structure of sentences. Application to the teaching of grammar in high schools.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 321 American Literature II Credits: 3

A survey of American literature and culture from 1865 to the present. This course will cover a range of authors, several genres, and culture forms, which may include fiction, poetry, drama, autobiography, essay, lyrics, and film.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 323 Shakespeare Credits: 3

An intensive critical study of William Shakespeare's writings in various contexts (historical, social, political, literary, contemporary, for example). Readings will encompass at least eight plays and will include at least one comedy, history, tragedy, and romance. Required of all English majors.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 325 Arthurian Legends Credits: 3

Focusing on writers such as Marie de France, Chretien de Troyes, Sir Thomas Malory, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Sara Teasdale, Bernard Malamud, and Marion Zimmer Bradley, this course examines the legend of King Arthur and his Round Table as a recurring myth, repeatedly manifested in time through literature, art, history, music, and film.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 326 Modern And Contemporary Irish Literature Credits: 3

This course examines a range of texts written by Irish-born writers from the end of the nineteenth century on. While it is likely the course will include texts by the most famous Irish writers, such as Yeats, Joyce, Beckett, O'Brien, Heaney, and Friel, course materials will vary from semester to semester and may focus on a specific genre, historical period, or area of interest.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 327 British Literature II Credits: 3

A survey of British Literature and culture from the late 18th century to the present. This course will cover a range of authors and genres, including at least one novel.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 330 History Of The English Language Credits: 3

The study of English beginning with the Indo-European language family up to and including varieties of English spoken around the world today. Both outer history and the inner history of phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon will be addressed.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 331 African American Literature I Credits: 3

This course provides a survey of African American literature from its beginnings to the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920's and 1930's. Areas of interest will include abolitionist literature (especially Slave Narratives), turn-of-the-century literature and the Harlem Renaissance. This course will examine any or all of the following literary forms: fiction, poetry, drama, autobiography and essay. It will view African American literature in its historical and cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

Cross Listings: BLKS 331.

ENGLISH 332WI African American Novel Credits: 3

This course will examine the African American Novel in the 19th and 20th centuries. The novels will be examined in their historical and cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 333 African American Literature II Credits: 3

A survey of African American literature from the end of the Harlem Renaissance to the present, covering a range of authors, texts, and contexts.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

Cross Listings: BLKS 333.

ENGLISH 336 Contemporary American Literature Credits: 3

This course focuses on contemporary American literature, concentrating on literary and cultural change. Topics, genres, and authors discussed will vary each semester.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 337 Introduction to American Literary and Cultural Studies Credits: 3

This course focuses on American literary and cultural production in an interdisciplinary manner. It explores how social, political, and economic conditions interact with the fields of art, film, history, and literature from colonial times to the present.

ENGLISH 339 Introduction to Screenwriting Credits: 3

An introduction to the form and language of the motion picture screenplays. Students create a blueprint for a movie and examine visual storytelling in-depth, including basic dramatic structure, scene and sequence construction and dialogue. Students will master the industry screenplay format, adapt a short story for the screen, and learn to receive feedback in small groups.

Prerequisites: DISC 200 or ENGLISH 225.

ENGLISH 340AWI Classical Literature in Translation Credits: 3

This course will focus on representative authors and works from the Greek and Roman Classical periods, such as Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Aeschylus, Aristophanes, Plato, the Greek Lyrics, Virgil, Horace, Juvenal, Ovid and Plautus.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

Cross Listings: Classics 340AWI.

ENGLISH 342WI Women And Rhetoric Credits: 3

A study of the position of women within the traditions of western rhetoric. Students will examine the rhetorical practices of women as they pursue both public and private goals. Christine de Pizan, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Hannah More, Maria Stewart, Frances Willard, Ida Wells-Barnett, Meridel Le Sueur, and Gloria Anzaldua are among the female rhetorians who may be studied in this course.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 344WI Women & Literary Culture: Genre Focus Credits: 3

A study of women writers that focuses on genre, i.e., texts that share a common set of conventions. The course will explore the conventions associated with a particular genre in various historical periods and consider the ways in which gender and genre intersect in shaping texts and their interpretation.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 345WI Women And Literary Culture: Historical Focus Credits: 3

A study of women's literary culture in a specific historical period either as broadly defined as Medieval or Renaissance or as narrowly defined as a decade or movement (e.g., 1960's, abolitionist movement). This course includes women writers across multiple boundaries (e.g., national, generic, racial, sexual, socio-economic). Content will change depending on the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 350 The 18th Century Novel Credits: 3

A detailed examination of the development of the novel in the 18th century. The course emphasizes the evolution of the novel from such predecessors as rogue literature, the picaresque story and the romance, due to changing social realities. The novelists studied may include Austen, Behn, Fielding, Godwin, Haywood, Richardson, Smollett, and Sterne.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 351 Special Readings Credits: 1-3

Readings in a period, genre or theme to be selected by the instructor with attention to the needs of students who are interested in literary topics not covered in regular offerings. Proposals for a course in such readings require the approval of the department.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 351A Special Readings: Detective Fiction Credits: 3

This course will focus on a specific period, sub-genre, or theme related to Detective fiction.

Prerequisites: Anchor II, DISC 200.

ENGLISH 355 The Novel Before 1900 Credits: 3

Intensive attention to novels in English written before 1900, which may include comparative or analytical studies of genre; critical reception of novels; serialization, gender issues; authors and editors; and valuation.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 356 Studies in Poetry Credits: 3

An intensive study of poetry through the examination of a specific topic or the works of particular poets, for instance: Love, Seduction, and Betrayal; Form and Change; Death, Grief, and Consolation; Whitman, Dickinson, and the Soul; Sacred Poetry; Poetry and Metaphysics; The Long Poem; The Comic Poem; Sonnet, Sonnet Sequence and the Lyric; The Voyage; Nature, Self, and the Romantic Poet.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 360 The Modern Novel Credits: 3

This course focuses on selected novelists between 1900 and 1945 and is organized around particular literary themes, sub-genres, or contemporary issues.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent), or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 365 Contemporary Novel Credits: 3

This course focuses on selected novelists since 1945 and is organized around particular literary themes, sub-genres, or contemporary issues.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 365WI Contemporary Novel Credits: 3

This course focuses on selected novelists since 1945 and is organized around particular literary themes, sub-genres, or contemporary issues.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 367 Introduction to Latina/o Literature Credits: 3

An introduction to the literary production by US Latinas/os, the course introduces students to writings by authors from various Latinidades—such as Chicana/Chicano, Puerto Rican, Chilean American, Cuban American, Dominican American, and Mexican American—in multiple genres, including poetry, fiction, drama, personal essay, and film.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

Cross Listings: LLS 380.

ENGLISH 376 Concepts of the Hero in Ancient Literature and World Cinema Credits: 3

This course explores how concepts of heroism are related to the principles of values and civic duty in a wide range of ancient world cultures and contemporary world cinemas. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of how these values impact individual heroes and their interactions with others in their society.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 376, COMM-ST 323.

ENGLISH 378 Asian American Literature Credits: 3

This course examines literary and cultural texts produced by Asian Americans from the nineteenth century to the present. Texts will be drawn from a variety of genres and from several Asian American groups in order to examine how Asian American literature engages, challenges, revises, and reinvents American literary traditions. The course will identify and explore specific cultural and political issues that have shaped the writings, including transnationalism, immigration, racial identity, group identity, and community. Authors may include Carlos Bulosan, Maxine Hong Kingston, John Okada, Bienvendo Santos, and Hisaye Yamamoto.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 404 Old English Credits: 3

This course is a study of Old English, its grammar, its poetic style, and its literature, both poetry and prose.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 405 Magazine Editing Credits: 3

A course combining academic study of editorial management, publishing operations and language skills, with "hands on" experience in article evaluation, editing, magazine production, and legal matters such as copyright and libel. Class work concentrates on authentic and effective language use, with attention given to copy editing, grammar, typography, printing processes, financing and distribution for commercial and small-press publications.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 408 Harlem Renaissance Credits: 3

This course examines the period from 1920 to 1940, known as the Harlem Renaissance, a time of unprecedented literary and cultural creativity by Black artists. This course explores a variety of cultural productions, not only traditional forms of literature such as novels, short stories, plays and poetry, but also nonliterary objects of study such as painting, sculpture, and music.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 410 Black Women Writers Credits: 3

This course explores the writings of African American Women Writers. The course examines how these writers have interacted with and often revised stereotypical representations of African American womanhood typically found within canonical and African American male literatures. The course will examine literature (which might include fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama) of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the majority of the works will be by modern and contemporary authors such as Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, and Terry McMillan. By placing the works in this sort of cultural and historical context, it will be possible to examine the unique tradition of African American women's writing as well as individual texts.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 412 Chaucer Credits: 3

Readings from Chaucer's most important works, especially "The Canterbury Tales" and "Troilus and Criseyde" with emphasis on them as types of medieval genres and on the Middle English language.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 413 Renaissance Literature I Credits: 3

English literature from the time of Wyatt and Surrey to the beginning of the 17th century, including the works of Spenser, Marlowe, Sidney, Shakespeare and others.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 414 Milton Credits: 3

A study of Milton's prose and poetry, with special attention to "Paradise Lost".

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 415 Restoration And Early 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the late 17th century to the mid 18th century. Selected writers may include Addison and Steele, Behn, Congreve, Defoe, Dryden, Finch, Milton, Pope, Rochester, Swift, and Wortley Montagu.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 416 The Romantic Period Credits: 3

An extensive study of selected writers (such as Austen, Barbauld, Byron, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Hemans, Keats, Gilpin, the Shelleys, Wollstonecraft, and Wordsworth) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Romantic period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 417 Modern Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by modernist poets such as Hopkins, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Moore, Pound, H.D., Eliot, Millay, Hughes.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 418 19th-Century American Literature Credits: 3

An intensive study of either selected major American writers in the 19th century or of 19th -century literary movements.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 311.

ENGLISH 422 Medieval Literature Credits: 3

Western religious and secular verse and prose to the 15th century. Late Middle English works are read in the original; all other selections in translation.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 423 Renaissance Literature II Credits: 3

English literature from 1600 to the beginning of the Restoration, including the works of Donne, Jonson, Milton and other contemporaries.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 425 18th-Century British Literature II Credits: 3

British literature in its critical and historical context from 1750 to 1798. The writers studied may include Blake, Burney, Collins, Johnson, and Gray.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 426 The Victorian Period Credits: 3

An intensive study of selected writers (such as Arnold, Braddon, the Brontes, the Brownings, Dickens, Darwin, Eliot, Gaskell, Hardy, Ruskin, and the Rossettis) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Victorian period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 427 Contemporary Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by contemporary poets (post World War II), such as Auden, Bishop, Hayden, Berryman, Rukeyser, Larkin, Rich, Plath, Heaney, Boland, Komunyakaa.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 428 20th-Century American Literature Credits: 3

An intensive study of either selected major American writers in the 20th century or of 20th-century literary movements.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 321.

ENGLISH 429B Advanced Screenwriting Credits: 3

This course provides students with advanced theory in narrative screenwriting, training in industry standard script analysis (called "coverage") and story editing. Students will be required to draft, revise and workshop a short film screenplay or will focus on a feature screenplay, delivering a draft and revision of the first act and a detailed outline for the rest of the script. Students will workshop feature screenplays in small groups, emphasizing the art of constructive story editing.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 339 or COMM-ST 354.

ENGLISH 431 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the mid to late 18th century. Selected writers may include Blake, Burney, Collins, Equiano, Fielding, Gray, Johnson, Sheridan, and Wollstonecraft.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 432WI Advanced Creative Writing Prose Credits: 3

A course for advanced students of fiction writing. Open to students who have taken English 312 or its equivalent. The class will proceed through analysis of models, discussion of general principles, critique of student work. Students will simultaneously be encouraged to experiment and to refine the form and subjects best suited to their talents. Emphasis will remain on the short story, though there may be units in other forms--novella, film script, the non-fiction essay.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 433 Histories Of Writing, Reading, And Publishing Credits: 3

A study of selected topics concerning the material practices of writing, reading, and publishing within specific cultural and historical contexts. Issues examined may include authorship, education, information technologies, libraries, literacy, periodicals, popular literature, publishers, and communities of readers.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, one appropriate introductory course at the 300 level.

ENGLISH 434 Postcolonial Literature Credits: 3

An exploration of postcolonialism through the study of literary and theoretical texts created by or representing peoples whose historical experience has been decisively shaped by the experience or legacies of colonialism. Texts will be drawn from a variety of genres and from several countries. The course will consider several definitions of postcolonialism and related terms such as cosmopolitanism, hybridity, diaspora, and nationalism.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

Cross Listings: ENGLISH 5534.

ENGLISH 435WI Advanced Creative Writing Poetry Credits: 3

An advanced poetry workshop that includes intensive reading of contemporary poetry and aims at each student creating a portfolio of publishable poems. The focus of the course will vary to address a variety of topics such as metaphor and closure; imitation and the line; form and voice. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 315 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

ENGLISH 436WI Poetic Forms Credits: 3

An advanced creative writing course that focuses on intensive study of and practice in metrics and traditional and nonce forms. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 315 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

ENGLISH 437WI Prose Forms Credits: 3

The making of a work of prose requires expertise with the structure of the chosen form, and an understanding of the relationship of form to content. This class teaches the techniques for planning and drafting major prose forms which could include the very-short story, the story, novella, novel, linked-story collection, episodic novel, essay novel, the play, the creative nonfiction book, and others. Students will learn how to create particular prose forms and how to use content as a guide to inventing new forms. We will examine some of the best examples of both traditional and newly invented forms by writers such as Anton Chekhov, Katherine Anne Porter, Tim O'Brien, and Sandra Cisneros.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 312, RooWriter.

ENGLISH 438 The "New Letters" Writing Conference Credits: 1-3

An intensive weekend conference for creative writers of varying genres and levels of experience, published and unpublished -- fiction, poetry, nonfiction, stage and screen. The conference includes creative and interdisciplinary sessions on writing and publishing, genre-specific workshops, socializing and networking opportunities, and private manuscript consultations. The course of study for two-and three-credit students includes selected reading and post-weekend tutorial time conducted by accomplished, working writers. The conference may be repeated once for credit. Two- and three-credit students need the instructor's consent and must have taken a 300-level creative-writing course in the focus genre prior to enrolling.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 439 Shakespeare and Film Credits: 3

Grounded in the close analysis of texts, this course examines film adaptations of Shakespeare's plays across the range of dramatic genres (history plays, tragedy, comedy, and romance). This course is open to seniors and graduate students only. Graduate students will be responsible for supplemental critical readings.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 323.

ENGLISH 440 American Culture Credits: 3

Texts that offer perspectives on key historical themes of American culture. Texts may be grouped around any culturally significant principle (e.g. region, race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion) or theme (e.g. the mythology of the frontier, marriage and domesticity, the American Dream). The course may be taken twice for credit, provided substantive changes in topic.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 311 and ENGLISH 321.

ENGLISH 441 Girls And Print Culture Credits: 3

This course deals with girls' relationships to the continually evolving print culture. Students will examine various literary representations of girlhood by adult writers, explore texts directed at girls (e.g., conduct books, periodicals, textbooks), and study the writing and reading practices of girls themselves.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 442 Playwriting I Credits: 3

Theory and practice of writing for the theatre with emphasis on the basic techniques.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 443 Playwriting II Credits: 3

Theory and practice of writing for the theatre with emphasis on advanced techniques.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 445 History And Principles Of Rhetoric Credits: 3

A study of selected writings of ancient, and modern rhetoricians illustrating key issues in the development of Western discourse theory and practice. Issues examined include the relationships between rhetoric and knowledge, orality and literacy, and rhetoric and poetics. Attention will also be given to the implications of rhetorical theory for modern language instruction.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 447 Theory and Criticism in English Studies Credits: 3

A survey of major schools and methods of literary theory and criticism. Authors and texts to be determined by the instructor of the course.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, junior or senior standing and six hours of literature.

ENGLISH 448 External Internship Credits: 1-3

Students may complete an external internship involving writing and editing with a publishing company, trade magazine, literary or academic journal, other print or electronic media organization, or with advertising, public relations, or non-profit firms. Internships are granted on a competitive basis. Students will compile a portfolio of their work under the direction of the internship supervisor to be submitted for evaluation to the department's internship coordinator.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 449A Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course provides practical experience with New Letters magazine, New Letters on the Air, and BkMk Press in business analysis/reporting, copy-editing, manuscript evaluation, promotion/grant development, library research, market research, and other skills. The practicum is limited to three students per semester, to be chosen on the basis of demonstrated writing and organizational skills. References are required. May be taken for no more than three credit hours over a maximum of two semesters. Permission of the instructors required.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 449B Publication Practicum Credits: 3

This course covers the basics of producing an issue of an academic journal. Students acquire hands-on experience at all stages of production.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 449C Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course allows students to work with a faculty member on an ad hoc project for publication such as a special journal issue or festschrift, book manuscript, a new scholarly edition of a primary text, or a digital edition. Course may be repeated once for continued work on the same project.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 450 Special Readings Credits: 1-3

Intensive individual readings in a field, genre, or individual figure to be selected by a student or a group of students in consultation with an instructor willing to direct the project. Generally limited to graduating seniors who have completed the majority of the work for their major. Not open to students in their first semester at UMKC. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 451 Shakespeare Comedies And Histories Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major comedies and history plays with special emphasis on his dramatic works before 1600.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317 and ENGLISH 323.

ENGLISH 452 Early English Drama Credits: 3

English religious and secular drama prior to Shakespeare. Mystery and morality plays are studied, with emphasis on their literary and social backgrounds. Close reading of such works as "Everyman," "The Wakefield Second Shepherd's Play," and "The Spanish Tragedy."

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317 and ENGLISH 323.

ENGLISH 453 Modern Drama, 1880-1945 Credits: 3

A study of modern drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory, and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the earlier modern playwrights from Ibsen and Shaw, with special attention to naturalism.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 455 Studies In The Novel 1740-1900 Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major novelists of the eighteenth or nineteenth century. The content of the course will change, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, completion of six hours of literature.

ENGLISH 460 Special Offerings Credits: 1-4

The visiting professor who gives this course determines what its content shall be. All aspects of literature and linguistics are within its possible range.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200. .

ENGLISH 461 Shakespeare Tragedies And Romances Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major tragedies and late romances with special emphasis on his dramatic literature after 1600.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317 and ENGLISH 323.

ENGLISH 462 Restoration And 18th-Century Drama Credits: 3

The drama after the restoration of the monarchy and the reopening of the theaters through the 18th century. Special emphasis is placed on the comedy of manners and the heroic drama in the Restoration and the sentimental comedy in the 18th century. Includes such playwrights as Dryden, Congreve, Etherege, Wycherley, Steele, Lillo, Cumberland, Sheridan, and Goldsmith.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 317.

ENGLISH 463 Contemporary Drama II Credits: 3

A study of contemporary drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the more recent writers, including the absurdists, with special attention to experimental drama.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 453.

ENGLISH 464 Medieval Methods & Paleography Credits: 3

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of medieval handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will examine the historical and cultural settings for medieval texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textural transmission in the medieval world. In addition to gaining familiarity with the many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for practical archival work in various European nations.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, First Year Latin.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 464.

ENGLISH 465 Studies In The Modern Novel Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major 20th-century novelists. The content of the course will change, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, completion of six hours of literature.

ENGLISH 468 Women's Literature in Africa and the African Diaspora Credits: 3

This course is a comparative examination of the variety of literary works produced by women of African descent in the United States, the Caribbean and Africa. Students will explore the cross-cultural implications of texts in light of the intersections of gender, race and class.

Cross Listings: BLKS 338

ENGLISH 470 Introduction To Descriptive Linguistics Credits: 3

General introduction to linguistics science. Linguistic analysis, structures and change. Language families. Historical reconstruction. Generative grammar.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 310.

ENGLISH 475 Creative Nonfiction Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the study and crafting of creative nonfiction. special attention is given to developing the writing techniques required to shape publishable narratives out of experience.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200, ENGLISH 312, ENGLISH 315, ENGLISH 316WI..

ENGLISH 499 Senior Tutorial Credits: 3

A comprehensive tutorial for students who have a faculty-approved research project. The project will culminate in a critical study of 20-25 pages or a creative writing portfolio of similar length. This course is appropriate for students who intend to continue their studies at the graduate level.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200.

ENGLISH 5500 Graduate Study In English Credits: 3

An introduction to methods of research and scholarship related to English studies. The course uses a wide spectrum of print and digital materials, library facilities (including archives and Special Collections), databases, and other resources to explore English studies as an academic discipline and profession.

ENGLISH 5500P Special Topics Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5501 Magazine Editing Credits: 3

A course combining academic study of editorial management, publishing operations, and language skills, with "hands on" experience in article evaluation, editing, magazine production, and legal matters such as copy right and libel. Class work concentrates on authentic and effective language use, with attention given to copy editing, grammar, typography, printing processes, financing and distribution for commercial and small-press publications.

ENGLISH 5502 Magazine Nonfiction Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the origination and execution of nonfiction magazine articles for a variety of publications. Special attention is given to successful queries and the various writing techniques required for different kinds or articles. Students learn re-structuring and revision and the legalities affecting writers. Students are expected to complete three publishable articles.

ENGLISH 5503 Old English Credits: 3

This course is a study of Old English, its grammar, its poetic style, and its literature, both poetry and prose.

ENGLISH 5508 Harlem Renaissance Credits: 3

This course examines the period from 1920 to 1940, known as the Harlem Renaissance, a time of unprecedented literary and cultural creativity by Black artists. This course explores a variety of cultural productions, not only traditional forms of literature such as novels, short stories, plays and poetry, but also nonliterary objects of study such as painting, sculpture, and music.

ENGLISH 5510 Black Women Writers Credits: 3

This course explores the writings of African American Women Writers. The course examines how these writers have interacted with and often revised stereotypical representations of African American womanhood typically found within canonical and African American male literatures. The course will examine literature (which might include fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama) of the 19th and 20th centuries; the majority of the works will be by modern and contemporary authors such as Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, and Terry McMillan. By placing the works in this sort of cultural and historical context, it will be possible to examine the unique tradition of African American women's writings as well as individual texts.

ENGLISH 5512 Chaucer Credits: 3

Readings from Chaucer's most important works, especially "The Canterbury Tales" and "Troilus and Criseyde" with emphasis on them as types of medieval genres and on the Middle English language. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5513 Renaissance Literature I Credits: 3

English literature from the time of Wyatt and Surrey to the beginning of the 17th century, including the works of Spenser, Marlowe, Sidney, Shakespeare and others. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5514 Milton Credits: 3

A study of Milton's prose and poetry, with special attention to "Paradise Lost". Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5515 Restoration And Early 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the late 17th century to the mid-18th cetury. Selected writers may include Addison and Steele, Behn, Congreve, Defoe, Dryden, Finch, Pope, Rochester, Swift, and Wortley Montagu.

ENGLISH 5516 The Romantic Period Credits: 3

An extensive study of selected writers (such as Austen, Barbauld, Byron, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Hemans, Keats, Gilpin, the Shelleys, Wollstonecraft, and Wordsworth) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Romantic period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 5517 Modern Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by modernist poets such as Hopkins, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Moore, Pound, H.D., Eliot, Millay, Hughes. Students will make in class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographic work.

ENGLISH 5518 19th-Century American Literature Credits: 3

An intensive study of either selected major American writers in the 19th century or of 19th-century literary movements. Students will make in class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5519 Teaching Writing: Theories, Histories, Contexts, Practices Credits: 3

This course focuses on issues related to the teaching of English at the high school and college levels, with an emphasis on the teaching of writing. Issues addressed may include assignment design, teaching invention and revision, response to and evaluation of writing, collaborative learning, relationships between reading and writing, classroom uses of electronic media, and institutional contexts within which teachers work. The course is required of Graduate Teaching Assistants in the UMKC Composition Program, to be taken either prior to or concurrently with their first semester of teaching. Secondary English teachers and others interested in English teaching are also welcome.

ENGLISH 5520 Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

Studies in methods and objectives for the teaching of English with special attention to secondary school teaching. This course is repeatable for credit with advisor approval.

ENGLISH 5520A Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5520B Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5520D Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5522 Medieval Literature Credits: 3

Western religious and secular verse and prose to the 15th century. Late Middle English works are read in the original; all other selections in translation. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5523 Renaissance Literature II Credits: 3

English literature from 1600 to the beginning of the Restoration, including the works of Donne, Jonson, Milton, and other contemporaries. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5526 The Victorian Period Credits: 3

An intensive study of selected writers (such as Arnold, Braddon, the Brontes, the Brownings, Dickens, Darwin, Eliot, Gaskell, Hardy, Ruskin, and the Rossettis) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Victorian period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 5527 Contemporary Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by contemporary poets (post- World War II), such as Auden, Bishop, Hayden, Berryman, Rukeyser, Larkin, Rich, Plath, Heaney, Boland, and Komunyakaa. Students will make in class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographic work.

ENGLISH 5528 20th Century American Literature Credits: 3

Major American writers or literary movements of the 20th century. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5529 Graduate Seminar: Screenwriting Credits: 3

A seminar on advanced theory in narrative screenwriting, script analysis and constructive story editing. Students draft, revise and workshop a short film script or a feature screen play, and deliver a pitch, treatment, draft and revision of the first act and detailed outline of the whole script. Students workshop feature screenplays in small groups.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 429B or COMM-ST 454.

Cross Listings: COMM-ST 354.

ENGLISH 5531 Late 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the mid to late 18th century. Selected writers may include Blake, Burney, Collins, Equiano, Fielding, Gray, Johnson, Sheridan, and Wollstonecraft.

ENGLISH 5532 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction Credits: 3

A course for advanced students of fiction writing. The class will proceed through analysis of models, discussion of general principles, and critique of student work. Students will simultaneously be encouraged to experiment and to refine the form and subjects best suited to their talents. Emphasis will remain on the short story, though there may be units in other forms--novella, film script, the non-fiction essay. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

ENGLISH 5533 Histories Of Writing, Reading, And Publishing Credits: 3

A study of selected topics concerning the material practices of writing, reading, and publishing within specific cultural and historical contexts. Issues examined may include authorship, education, information technologies, libraries, literacy, periodicals, popular literature, publishers, and communities of readers.

ENGLISH 5534 Postcolonial Literature Credits: 3

An exploration of postcolonialism through the study of literary and theoretical texts created by or representing peoples whose historical experience has been decisively shaped by the experience or legacies of colonialism. Texts will be drawn from a variety of genres and from several countries. The course will consider several definitions of postcolonialism and related terms such as cosmopolitanism, hybridity, diaspora, and nationalism.

ENGLISH 5535 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry Credits: 3

An advanced poetry workshop that includes intensive reading of contemporary poetry and aims at each student creating a portfolio of publishable poems. The focus of the course will vary to address a variety of topics such as metaphor and closure; imitation and the line; form and voice. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

ENGLISH 5536 Poetic Forms Credits: 3

An advanced creative writing course that focuses on intensive study of and practice in metrics and traditional and nonce forms. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 315 or equivalent.

ENGLISH 5537 Prose Forms Credits: 3

This course covers techniques for planning and drafting major prose forms. Students will learn how to use content as a guide to inventing new forms (i.e. novella, novel, linked-story collection, episodic novel, essay novel, and creative nonfiction book.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 432WI, ENGLISH 435WI.

ENGLISH 5538 Women's Literature in Africa and the African Diaspora Credits: 3

This course is a comparative examination of the variety of literary works produced by women of African descent in the United States, the Caribbean and Africa. Students will explore the cross-cultural implications of texts in light of the intersections of gender, race and class.

Cross Listings: BLKS 5538.

ENGLISH 5540 American Culture Credits: 3

Texts that offer perspectives on key historical themes of American culture. Texts may be grouped around any culturally significant principle (e.g. region, race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion) or theme (e.g. the mythology of the frontier, marriage and domesticity, the American Dream). Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5541 Girls And Print Culture Credits: 3

This course deals with girls' relationships to the continually evolving print culture. Students will examine various literary representations of girlhood by adult writers, explore texts directed at girls (e.g., conduct books, periodicals, textbooks), and study the writing and reading practices of girls themselves.

ENGLISH 5545 History And Principles Of Rhetoric Credits: 3

A study of selected writings of ancient and modern rhetoricians illustrating key issues in the development of Western discourse theory and practice. Issues examined include the relationships between rhetoric and knowledge, orality and literacy, and rhetoric and poetics. Attention will also be given to the implications of rhetorical theory for modern language instruction. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5547 Theory and Criticism in English Studies Credits: 3

A survey of major schools and methods of literary theory and criticism. Authors and texts to be determined by the instructor of the course.

ENGLISH 5548 External Internship Credits: 1-3

Students may complete an external internship involving writing and editing with a publishing company, trade magazine, literary or academic journal, other print or electronic media organization, or with advertising, public relations, or non-profit firms. Internships are granted on a competitive basis. Students will compile a portfolio of their work under the direction of the internship supervisor to be submitted for evaluation to the department’s internship coordinator.

ENGLISH 5549A Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course provides practical experience with New Letters magazine, New Letters on the Air, and BkMk Press in business analysis/reporting, copy-editing, manuscript evaluation, promotion/grant development, library research, market research, and other skills. The practicum is limited to three students per semester, to be chosen on the basis of demonstrated writing and organizational skills. References are required. May be taken for no more than three credit hours over a maximum of two semesters. Permission of the instructors required.

ENGLISH 5549B Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course covers the basics of producing an issue of an academic journal. Students acquire hands-on experience at all stages of production.

ENGLISH 5549C Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course allows students to work with a faculty member on an ad hoc project for publication such as a special journal issue or festschrift, book manuscript, a new scholarly edition of a primary text, or a digital edition. Course may be repeated once for continued work on the same project.

ENGLISH 5550 Graduate Seminar Credits: 3

Authors, works and intellectual currents which form the basis of these seminars may vary from semester to semester, depending upon the instructor's design for the course. May be repeated for credit. Continued in ENGLISH 5555.

ENGLISH 5550A Graduate Seminar Medieval Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550B Graduate Seminar Renaissance Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550C Graduate Seminar Neo-Classical Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550D Graduate Seminar 19th Century Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550E Graduate Seminar American Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550F Graduate Seminar Modern Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550G Graduate Seminar Literary Criticism Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550H Graduate Seminar Studies In Fiction I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550I Graduate Seminar In Dramatic Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550J Graduate Seminar: History Of The English Language Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550K Graduate Seminar: Creative Writing Prose Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550M Graduate Seminar In Rhetoric And Composition Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550MA Greater Kansas City Writing Project: Invitational Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550MC Greater K.C. Writing Project:Writing & The Teaching Of Literature Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550MD Greater Kc Writing Project:Critical Thinking & Process Writing Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550ME Greater K.C. Wrtg Project:Researching The Theories Of Tchng Wrtng Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550N Graduate Seminar: Criticism Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550P Graduate Seminar: Sociolinguistics And Dialectology Credits: 3

Seminar focusing on the role of social factors in language use, and on the origin and development of regional and urban dialects in English. Special attention will be paid to sociolinguistic motivations for change, variation and merger in dialects and languages in contact, and Black English.

ENGLISH 5551 Shakespeare Comedies And Histories Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major comedies and history plays with special emphasis on his dramatic works before 1600. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5552 Early English Drama Credits: 3

English religious and secular drama prior to Shakespeare. Mystery and morality plays are studied with emphasis on their literary and social backgrounds. Close readings of such works as "Everyman," "The Wakefield Second Shepherd's Play," and "The Spanish Tragedy." Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5553 Modern Drama 1880-1945 Credits: 3

A study of modern drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory, and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the earlier modern playwrights from Ibsen to Shaw, with special attention to naturalism. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5555 Graduate Seminar Credits: 3

Graduate Seminar - second half.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 5550.

ENGLISH 5555A Graduate Seminar Medieval Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555B Graduate Seminar Renaissance Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555C Graduate Seminar Neo-Classical Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555D Graduate Seminar In 19th-Century Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555E Graduate Seminar American Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555F Graduate Seminar In Modern Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555G Graduate Seminar Literary Criticism Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555H Graduate Seminar Studies In Fiction II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555I Graduate Seminar In Dramatic Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555J Graduate Seminar English Language Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555K Graduate Seminar In Creative Writing:Poetry Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555M Graduate Seminar: Composition Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555N Graduate Seminar: Prose Fiction Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5556 Studies In The Novel 1740-1900 Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major novelists of the eighteenth or nineteenth century. The content of the course will change, depending on the instructor. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5560 Special Topics Credits: 1-4

The professor who gives this course determines what its content shall be. All aspects of English studies are within its possible range.

ENGLISH 5561 Shakespeare:Tragedies And Romances Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major tragedies and late romances with special emphasis on his dramatic literature after 1600. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5562 Restoration And 18th- Century Drama Credits: 3

The drama after the restoration of the monarchy and the reopening of the theatres through the 18th century. Special emphasis is placed on the comedy of manners and the heroic drama in the Restoration and the sentimental comedy in the 18th-century. Includes such playwrights as Dryden, Congreve, Etherege, Wycherley, Steele, Lillo, Cumberland, Sheridan, and Goldsmith. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5563 Contemporary Drama Credits: 3

A study of contemporary drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the more recent writers, including the absurdists, with special attention to experimental drama. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5564 Medieval Methods & Paleography Credits: 3

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of medieval handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will examine the historical and cultural settings for medieval texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textural transmission in the medieval world. In addition to gaining familiarity with the many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal, and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for practical archival work in various European nations.

Prerequisites: First Year Latin.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5583.

ENGLISH 5565 Studies In Modern Novel Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major 20th- century novelists. The content of the course will change depending on the instructor. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5566CA Cluster Course: Images Of The Human Body In The Renaissance Credits: 3

Focusing on Renaissance conceptions of the human body, this cluster treats the following topics as they are reflected in Renaissance literature, art, astrology, astronomy, biology, anatomy, medicine, and politics: A) The dignity of the human body B) Microcosm and macrocosm. C) The human body and the heavens D) Stranger manifestations: freaks and beasts E) The humors F) Disorders of the human body G) The body politic H) The human body as an object of study.

ENGLISH 5566CF Courts And Culture In The Middle Ages Credits: 3

This cluster course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Middle Ages, focusing on medieval cultures in Europe. Arranged around a series of themes, the cluster will read a variety of documentary and literary texts to investigate not only the "high culture" of the courts but also the interactions of people from various social backgrounds in Western Europe.

ENGLISH 5575 Advanced Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction Credits: 3

This course is devoted to the study and crafting of the personal essay. Students will explore - and - practice many different varieties of this diverse form. Whether in the guise of aesthetic appreciation, cultural critique, personal history, political reportage, or travelogue, our course readings are first and foremost PERSONAL narratives, both troubled and enriched by their subjectivity (the essay's ' I '). Students will study the many challenges particular to this form (most of which concern notions of truth, and its rendering) and strive to overcome them as they create vivid personal narratives of their own.

ENGLISH 5582 European Literature: 18th Century Credits: 3

The 18th-century course will focus on a representative sampling from authors such as Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Voltaire, Prevost, La Bruyere, La Rochefoucauld, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau, Schiller, Goethe, and Grimmelshausen. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5591 Research In Selected Fields Credits: 1-3

Individual study under the direction of a senior member of the department, leading to the writing of a formal or scholarly paper. May be repeated for credit.

ENGLISH 5598A MFA Thesis Credits: 3-6

Under the guidance of a graduate MFA faculty member, students completing the MFA must complete and orally defend a publishable or producible manuscript. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit.

ENGLISH 5599 Research And Thesis Credits: 1-9

A student, with permission of the graduate committee, may write a thesis for 3 hours credit.

ENGLISH 5600 Introduction To Doctoral Study In English Credits: 3

Introduction to research skills necessary for doctoral work, particularly for writing the thesis; attention will be paid both to traditional skills such as bibliography and to computer skills.

ENGLISH 5601 Culminating Experience in Literature Credit: 1

Under the guidance of a graduate faculty member in English, students following the program of study in Literature must revise and orally defend a 20-30 page paper in Literature on a pass/no pass basis.

ENGLISH 5602 Culminating Experience in Language & Literature Credit: 1

Under the Guidance of a graduate faculty member in English, Students following the program of study in Language & Literature must revise and orally defend a 20-30 page paper in Language & Literature on a pass/no pass basis.

ENGLISH 5603 Culminating Experience in Manuscript, Print Culture, & Editing. Credit: 1

Under the guidance of a graduate faculty member in English, students following the program of Study in Manuscript, Print Culture, and Editing must revise and orally defend a 20-30 page paper in Manuscript, Print Culture, and Editing on a pass/no pass basis.

ENGLISH 5650 Doctoral Seminar Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5691 Doctoral Research In Selected Fields Credits: 3

Individual study under the direction of a senior member of the department leading to the writing of a formal or scholarly paper. May be repeated for credit.

ENGLISH 5699 Research And Dissertation Credits: 1-15

Research and preparation for the doctoral dissertation.

ENGLISH 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

History Courses

HISTORY 101 U.S. History to 1877 Credits: 3

This course offers a broad survey of American history up to 1877.

HISTORY 102 U.S. History Since 1877 Credits: 3

This course covers American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present.

HISTORY 127 Global Inequality: Slavery in Historical and Archaeological Perspective Credits: 3

Using archaeological and historical evidence from around the world, including the state of Missouri and the Kansas City region, students will explore the conditions which gave rise to inequality. By exploring slavery in various forms, students will understand its historical development, as well as its continued impact on society today.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 127

HISTORY 201 European History to 1600 Credits: 3

This course surveys the political, social and cultural history of Europe from ancient times to 1600. Beginning with a brief description of the riverine civilizations of the ancient Near East, the course then examines the political and cultural evolution of classical Greco-Roman civilization, the medieval world, the rise of the national state, and the essential characteristics of the eras of the Renaissance and Reformation.

HISTORY 202 European History since 1600 Credits: 3

This course surveys the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe from about 1600 to the present. Emphasis is given to themes of continuity and change in European culture through the experience of political, scientific and industrial revolutions, conservative reactions, liberal reforms, nation building, imperialism, two world wars, fascism, communism and the Cold War.

HISTORY 206 World History To 1450 Credits: 3

This course surveys the cultural, social, economic, and political history of the world to 1450. It studies the development of civilizations in isolation as well as the origins, nature, and consequences of global forms of interaction and exchange.

HISTORY 208 World History since 1450 Credits: 3

This course surveys the social, economic, political history of the world from 1450 to the present. It studies the development of civilizations in isolation as well as the origins, nature, and consequences of global forms of interaction and exchange.

HISTORY 213 Researching Kansas City Credits: 3

Researching Kansas City is an interdisciplinary undergraduate research course open to honors and other high-achieving students. It will introduce students to scholarly research and analysis through the exploration of important issues of the past and present in Kansas City.

Prerequisite: Honors Program Student.

Cross Listings: HONORS 215.

HISTORY 215 Getting High: Alcohol & Drugs in American History Credits: 3

This class will investigate historical transformations in how American society has defined and responded to problematic drinking and drug use. The class will analyze what controversies surrounding various forms of intoxication indicate about the nature of American society and culture.

HISTORY 300B Special Studies In History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300BB Special Studies in History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300BL Special Studies In History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300C Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300CF Cluster Course: Race in American Film Credits: 3

This course examines representations of race and ethnicity in American film from the silent era onward in mainstream and countercultural traditions. It explores how social, political, and economic conditions contribute to constructions of race and ethnicity.

Cross Listings: ENGLISH 300CQ.

HISTORY 300CO CC:Women In the Ancient World Credits: 3

This focuses on the history, representation, literature, social lives, and political roles ow women in ancient civilization including Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Biblical World, Greece, and Rome. It integrates methodologies from history, art history and archaeology, literary studies, and women's studies.

HISTORY 300D Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300F Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300G Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300H Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300J Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300K Special Studies History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300L Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300MC Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300MM Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300P Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300R Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300RA Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300RB Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300RH Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300SS Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300W Special Studies History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300WY Decade of Dissent: The 1960s Credits: 3

The social movements and conflicts that developed during the 1960s continue to define American culture. Questions of racial and gender equity, a greater willingness to challenge authority, concerns about the environment, and a new openness about issues of sexuality all developed during the sixties and remain as arenas of debate today. This course will examine the origins, contexts, and major themes of the these social and cultural movements.

HISTORY 301WI Historiography and Method Credits: 3

This basic course is required of all history majors at the beginning of the junior year. Content includes: 1) what history is; 2) its value and usefulness; 3) the diversity of our fields, approaches, and methods; and 4) the techniques of preparing and writing history papers. Texts and reading are approved by the Department (i.e.: Turabian for style). Although the emphasis is general instead of particular, the instructor will be assisted by other historians representing their main special interest areas.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

HISTORY 302 Colonial North America, 1492–1763 Credits: 3

This course examines European colonization in North America, from the voyage of Christopher Columbus to the eve of the American Revolution. Students will consider the Atlantic-world context of colonization, the environmental factors that shaped colonial development, and the complex interactions of European, African, and Indian peoples.

HISTORY 303 The American Revolution, 1763-1789 Credits: 3

This course examines the history of the American Revolution, from the explosive political crisis of the 1760s to the struggle over ratification of the Constitution. Students will consider the origins and conduct of the war, as well as the Revolution’s far-reaching political, social, and economic consequences.

HISTORY 304 America, 1783-1828: The National Experience Credits: 3

The two major threads of this course are the formation and implementation of the Constitution and the cultural adolescence of the new nation. Topics considered include the political bequest of the framers' generation, the growing pains of territorial expansion and industrialism, the paradoxical development of regionalism and nationalism.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5504.

HISTORY 305 America, 1828-1852: The Jacksonian Period Credits: 3

An analysis of the political, social, economic, and intellectual factors in American society, 1828-1852. The period featured the presidency of Andrew Jackson, the shaping of a new democratic ideology, the culmination of manifest destiny, the quickening of the antislavery impulse, the Mexican War, the growing sectional split, and the Compromise of 1850.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5505.

HISTORY 306 America, 1850-1877: Civil War and Reconstruction Credits: 3

A survey of the political, social and economic factors leading to the dissolution of the federal union is followed by a consideration of the major features and developments of the war period. This, in turn, leads to an analysis of the major factors and relationships involved in the "reconstruction" of the federal union. The course covers the years 1850 to 1877.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5506.

HISTORY 306A History of Christianity to the Middle Ages Credits: 3

This course examines the cultural, historical and theological development of Christianity from its origins to the High Middle Ages. The main themes follow the mechanisms and conditions shaping Christianity's expansion into a major cultural, social, institutional, and intellectual force in Western Europe with a focus on patterns of crisis and reform.

HISTORY 307 America 1877-1917: Development of Industrial America Credits: 3

This course deals with the reactions of different groups of Americans to the industrialization and urbanization of the United States from 1877 to 1917, using concepts associated with modernization upon the behavior of the business community, farmers, laborers, immigrants, professionals and major ethno-cultural groupings. Other contemporary proposals for the adjustment to industrialism are explained as well as the programs which each group eventually used to adjust to modern society.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5507.

HISTORY 307A History of Christianity from the Middles Ages to Present Credits: 3

This course examines the cultural, historical and theological development of Christianity from the High Middle Ages to the present. The main themes follow the development of foundational Christian theological thought and practice into what are now mainstream Western Christian theologies, the institutional histories of Western Christianity, and the cultures of Western civilization.

HISTORY 308A America: 1914-1945: The Era Of The World Wars Credits: 3

This course examines United States social, intellectual, economic, political and diplomatic history from the beginning of World War I to the end of World War II. Special emphasis is placed on the coexistence of realism and idealism in American foreign policy, the evolution of power shifts within the American federal system, and the causes and consequences of rapid urban growth and increased industrial sophistication. Students examine the material and social texture of life during the two world wars, the so-called "roaring 20s", and the Great Depression through contemporary art forms (especially novels) and historical monographs.

HISTORY 308B Cold War, Conformity, and Dissent: America, 1945-1989 Credits: 3

This course examines United States social, cultural, intellectual, economic, political, and transformational history from the end of World War II in 1945 to the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989. Given our focus on the recent past, special emphasis is placed upon the importance of the historical perspective to an understanding of contemporary affairs. Major themes include: America's rise to the world power, the development of the Keynesian welfare state, the concentration of corporate wealth and power, the persistence of poverty amidst plenty, and the changing status of American women and racial and ethnic minority groups.

HISTORY 309 World War II Film and Propaganda Credits: 3

This course examines film and propaganda, including posters, political cartoons, speeches, and other media, created in prewar or wartime conditions by both the Allies and Axis powers from 1933 to 1945 as it affected World War II.

HISTORY 330PW The Works of Western Man Credits: 4

In the period 1750-1987, the nations bordering the Atlantic Ocean, largely relying on their technological advances, became world powers. This course, relying on analysis of films plus required readings, will survey the energy sources employed, the tools developed, and the regimes of the workplace which led to this dominance. Grades will be assigned to three types of exercises: frequent quizzes, a mini-project in historical research and a book critique of a piece of fiction.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

HISTORY 331P America In The Machine Age Credits: 4

The United States has experienced repeated waves of technological advancements. This course will largely focus on industrialization in the 19th century as well as consumer society of our own era. How Americans produced goods and what were the dynamics of the market place are two central themes. Required readings will be complemented by films and presentations from resource persons throughout Kansas City. A research project and three tests are required.

HISTORY 348 Missouri/Kansas Border Wars Credits: 3

This course explores the history of the Civil War on the Missouri/Kansas border, where residents first shed blood over the issue slavery. An exploration of this most uncivil of wars provides insight into the ways in which societies can be fragmented by ideology and ultimately rebuilt upon different lines.

HISTORY 354R Women in Modern America Credits: 3

This course traces the part women have played in the processes of industrialization and urbanization. It looks at the general demographic, economic and social changes affecting women of all classes, as well as the role of middle-class women in the progressive, prohibition and suffrage movements. The course will also study the impact of the two world wars and the Depression upon the roles of women.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5554.

HISTORY 355BA Indians of North America to 1789 Credits: 3

The history of the native peoples of North America from their origins to the era of the American Revolution.

HISTORY 355BB Indians of North America Since 1789 Credits: 3

The history of the native people of North America (Indians and Inuit) and their interaction with the European invaders since 1789. This course is the sequel to HISTORY 355BA, Indians of North America to 1789.

HISTORY 356 Rise of the City in the U.S. Credits: 3

This course treats the background and major developments of the urbanization of the United States. Includes the American urban tradition, the scope of urbanization, colonial beginnings, urban rivalries, promotion, case studies of cities, the growth of urban services, the slum, problems of government, population trends, urban planning, and suburban growth. Consideration is also given to the methods and techniques of urban research and history of the development of this field.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5556.

HISTORY 356R Kansas City: History of a Regional Metropolis Credits: 3

This course uses Kansas City as an urban laboratory to help students better understand the dynamics of the urbanization process in America. It features lectures and discussions on such subjects as early settlement patterns, the battle for the first bridge over the Missouri River, the development of an economy based on agricultural pursuits, the City Beautiful Movement, the social fabric, the Pendergast Machine, and the impact of World War II and after. The course fits Kansas City into the larger framework of the American urban mosaic.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5556R.

HISTORY 357 The American West Credits: 3

This course deals with the relationship of the American West to the social and economic development of the United States. Major emphasis is placed on the role of the trans-Mississippi West in the economic growth of the national economy. Related cultural and political events are evaluated in the terms of the many Western frontiers. Emphasis will be placed on the Turner thesis, the Indian heritage, frontier violence, and the cow town experience.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5557.

HISTORY 358 History of the American South I Credits: 3

A study of the political, intellectual, cultural, economic, and social development of the American South up to and including the Civil War. Special topics discussed will be the plantation system, slavery, abolition, secession, the Confederacy, and the interaction of the region with the nation.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5558R.

HISTORY 360R Constitutional History of the United States Credits: 3

The general question covered is: how does American society govern itself? Topics include the fusion of Anglo traditions and American environment, creation of the American republic under the Constitution of 1787, the struggle for sovereignty during the Marshall-Taney era, and the Supreme Court's utilization of the 14th Amendment to adapt the Constitution to modernity.

HISTORY 361 America and the World in the Global Age: 1900 to the Present Credits: 3

Following a rapid survey of American diplomatic and transnational affairs before 1900, this course analyzes America's increasingly complex encounters with the world - by government officials and non-state actors - since that date. Attention is given to the interrelationships of domestic and international contexts, with an attempt to discover political, geographic, technological, cultural, and economic influences that have shaped this area of American development.

HISTORY 364R Nature, Culture And The Human Experience Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to various interpretations of nature with a focus on American culture and society. We will consider ideas about nature from diverse perspectivesincluding history, literature, philosophy and religion-in order to understand how human perceptions and uses shape relations with the natural world. Specific themes include such diverse topics as the aesthetic tradition, environmental thought, and environmental justice.

HISTORY 365A American Environmental History Credits: 3

This course examines the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. The main argument of this course will be that American History looks very different through an environmental lens. Nature is an important category of historical analysis-as well as a topic worthy of historical study itself-and this course will examine themes as diverse as Native American ecology to the modern environment crusade.

HISTORY 366RR American Labor History Credits: 3

This course examines the history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1750 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement, the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers' relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5566RR.

HISTORY 368 Children and Youth in American History Credits: 3

This course-which brings a gendered perspective to the history of childhood and the study of youth-focuses on the changing construction of girlhood and boyhood from precontact to the present. We will examine the variety of forces that have scripted the lives of children and adolescents and explore the active role they have played in shaping their lives and American culture. We will make use of the scholarly literature on childhood and youth as well as examine such primary sources as childbearing manuals, laws, literature, cartoons, and toys as material culture.

HISTORY 369 Women and Work in Early America Credits: 3

This course examines the ways in which gender, race, region, and class have shaped the historical experiences of American women. Students will trace women’s lives from pre-European contact to 1877 through an examination of a wide variety of social, cultural, economic, and political forces and factors.

HISTORY 370 Introduction to Material Culture Credits: 3

This course will consider the ways in which material culture contributes to our understanding of history. Scholars have increasingly recognized the significance of "the things they left behind," particularly as they provide insights to the lives of those who did not leave extensive written records. Students will consider all aspects of material culture, drawing largely on examples from American history: architecture, domestic utensils and furnishings, clothing, tools, and good agricultural practices. The courses will emphasize the process of handicraft technology as well as the product, and will consider the impact of modernization upon both process and product.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5570.

HISTORY 371 American History Through Film Credits: 3

This course will move through the twentieth century and highlight major themes and developments that reveal the contours of American history as depicted in film. Students will examine the ways in which filmmakers have presented history, paying particular attention to the presentation of political, cultural, and social conflicts.

HISTORY 379 Museums, Monuments, and American Life: An Introduction to Public History Credits: 3

This course will investigate the ways America commemorates, invokes, and misremembers its history—what scholars call public history. Students will learn the skills professionals use to communicate historical scholarship to wider audiences, and will grapple with the political and ethical issues that arise when we expand the discipline’s stakeholders.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5579.

HISTORY 391 Archival Methods Credits: 3

This combined discussion and research course will examine the research potential of primary-source materials in the custody of archival depositories and the methodology employed to utilize effectively these resources. An analysis of archival method, specifically in the areas of arrangement, description and preservation, will be emphasized during the discussion portion of the course. Most of the course will be devoted to independent research in various collections of the Regional Archives of the Kansas City Federal Records Center. The course will meet at such places as the Federal Records Center, 2306 Bannister Road, or the Truman Library for both the discussion and research segments.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5591.

HISTORY 392A Archival Internship Credits: 1-3

Students work directly with professional archivists and other personnel at the Kansas City Federal Records Center, the Truman Library, Jackson County Historical Society, and similar facilities in the area. Emphasis will be given to areas of arrangement, description and preservation of archival materials. Each student must make individual arrangements through the department.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5592.

HISTORY 392B Public History Internship Credits: 1-3

Students work directly with public history and editorial personnel at the Kansas City Museum, the Kansas City Pitch Weekly, the Truman Library, and similar facilities in the area. Depending on the institutional affiliation, emphasis will be given to museum operations and displays, editing, fund-raising, historical research and writing. Each student must make individual arrangements through the department.

HISTORY 393 Museum Studies Credits: 3

This course is designed to acquaint students with specific careers in museums and historical agencies; to introduce students to the wide range of operating issues facing those working in the museum profession on a day-to-day basis; and to familiarize students with the organizations, reference works and resources available to develop the skills and training required for those who choose to make this their profession.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5593.

HISTORY 394 African American History Before 1877 Credits: 3

This course is a survey of the African American experience from Pre-Columbian exploration through reconstruction. The course focuses on the trans-Atlantic slave trade, slavery in the colonies as well as resistance and abolition movements.

HISTORY 395 African American History Since 1877 Credits: 3

This course is a survey of African Americans in the United States from 1877 to the present. The course explores the post-reconstruction era, civil rights and black nationalistic movements; the concepts of racism, desegregation/integration and separation. Contemporary issues facing a multiracial and pluralistic society are also addressed.

HISTORY 398 Black Civil Rights in the 20th and 21st Centuries Credits: 3

This course examines the fight for black civil rights in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries, focusing on the Jim Crow period, the fight to end segregation, and the enduring problem of race in the United States.

HISTORY 400 Special Studies Credits: 1-3

Courses on subjects which are not a part of the regular department offering. The courses result from one or more of the following: (1) The expressed desire of students; (2) the broadened or refocused scholarship of a member of the history faculty; (3) the temporary presence of a scholar whose specialization is not reflected in the department's regular offerings; (4) the conclusion by the department that the course meets a community need; (5) the effort of the history faculty to provide an interdisciplinary approach to an era or topic. The course is experimental in the sense that it is a one-time offering with the potential of repetition or modification--depending upon student, faculty and community response.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5500R.

HISTORY 400B Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400C Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400CC Special Studies Credits: 3

HISTORY 400CL Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400CP American Social Film: Silver Screen and the American Dream Credits: 3

This course will combine American social history and American film history. Using Hollywood entertainment films, the course will look at Hollywood as an indicator of social, political, and economic conditions in the U.S. from the early 1900s to the late 1950s. The main topics are war and the threat of war, poverty and affluence, racial tensions, censorship, and political zealotry. A paper is required, and a social history textbook, a film history textbook, a play by Arthur Miller and a collection of articles constitute core readings.

Cross Listings: ENGLISH 300CD.

HISTORY 400CW Cluster Course: Critical Issues in Women's & Gender Studies Credits: 3

What does it mean to grow up female in America? How does being female influence the body, the mind, identity? This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the issues that have shaped the lives of American women throughout the life cycle and across the timeline. This course examines the role that culture and society have played in shaping and defining what it means to be an American girl and woman.

Cross Listings: ENGLISH 300CW.

HISTORY 400CY Cluster Course: The Ancient World And The Cinema Credits: 3

This course will explore the tradition of depicting the ancient Mediterranean world in film from the early silent era to the present. Topics to be covered include the ways that filmmakers respond to literary and historical sources from the ancient world, interact with the artistic tradition of films about the ancient world, the relation of these films to other works by the same creative personnel (directors, actors, writers, producers, etc.), and the political and cultural contexts in which the films were released.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 300CY, COMM-ST 300CY, ENGLISH 300CY.

HISTORY 400D Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400F Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400G Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400GN Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400J Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400JCA Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400K Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400LA Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400M Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400SS Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400T Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400W Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400WI Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 401A Religion in America Credits: 3

An in-depth examination of selected aspects of the history of religions in America from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis will be given to methodological issues in the study of American religious history.

HISTORY 404 Women and Gender in Latin America Credits: 3

This course studies gender in Latin America from the eve of conquest by the Portuguese and Spanish in the fifteenth century to the present. It examines how ideas about gender affected the lives of Latin American men and women. This course additionally analyzes how gender and race contributed to the creation of a hierarchical social order. Finally, it discusses the exercise of authority within and outside households and its impact on private and public spaces.

HISTORY 406 Modern Latin America Credits: 3

This course studies social, political, economic and cultural trends in Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Discussion topics include nation building after independence with an emphasis on gender and race in the creation of national identities and new forms of social stratification; integration of national economies into the world economic system; the expansion of political participation and citizenship; immigration (national and transnational) and the tensions caused by the forces of modernization and tradition. Although the purpose of the course is to provide a general background for a large and diverse region (more than 20 countries), case studies from Argentina, Mexico and Brazil will illustrate the above-mentioned themes and will provide the basis for a comparative regional perspective.

HISTORY 408 Gender, Health, and Development in Senegal Credits: 3

This course examines women’s economic empowerment, health education initiatives, philanthropy, and social entrepreneurship in West Africa and Senegal in particular. In the main city of Dakar we will visit indigenous and global nonprofits to study their policies and processes. The culture, both urban and rural, will be experienced in order to provide a unique perspective on the Senegalese and their culture.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing - must meet requirements established by study abroad office

Cross Listings: HLSC 408, WGS 408.

HISTORY 411A Medieval Civilization I Credits: 3

This course covers the period between the decline of the Roman Empire in the West and the Investiture Controversy. Topics include the rise of Christianity and early church-state relationships; the barbarian invasions and the various Germanic kingdoms; the age of Charlemagne; monasticism and feudalism. There will also be special sessions on the civilizations of Islam and Byzantium.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5511.

HISTORY 411B Medieval Civilization II Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5512.

HISTORY 412A Medieval Women & Children Credits: 3

This course explores the roles of women in the social, economic, political and cultural environments of medieval and early modern Europe. We examine the lives of women in all areas of life, from the ordinary to the extraordinary, in urban and rural environments, from the centers of religious and political power to the margins of society. Focus will be on the world of work for urban and peasant women and on the social and legal institutions of marriage, kinship and the family. The course makes extensive use of primary sources by and about women during this period.

HISTORY 412B The Black Death and Late Medieval Society Credits: 3

This course examines all aspects of late medieval and early Renaissance society in Western Europe. The Black Death of 1348/1349 serves as the entry point into the historical study of the economy, demography, and culture during this transitional period.

HISTORY 413 Renaissance Credits: 3

Beginning with a definition and exploration of the Renaissance as a period of gradual transition between the Middle Ages and the beginning of modern culture, this course concerns itself primarily with the rise and spread of Humanism; the revival of interest in antiquity; the growth of individualism; and the rise of secularism, as well as with the artistic achievements of the period.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5513.

HISTORY 414 Reformation Credits: 3

Beginning with a description and analysis of the social, intellectual and political aspects of the later Middle Ages, the course continues with an examination of those profound religious, social and political changes which mark the 16th century as the end of the Middle Ages and the beginning of the modern secular era.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5514.

HISTORY 415B 17th and 18th Century European History Credits: 3

this course is designed to present the upper-division undergraduate with a firm grasp of the major intellectual, cultural, political and economic developments of 17th and 18th century Europe. It considers the bitter Thirty Years War in Central Europe, the rise of the Netherlands, the fall of Italy and Spain, the rise of constitutional and absolutist styles of government, the scientific revolution, the colonization by European of the Pacific and Indian Ocean Basins, Enlightenment political philosophy, the Agricultural Revolution, and the French Revolution.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5515B.

HISTORY 416R The French Revolution and Napoleon Credits: 3

Narrative history concentrating on the explosive and colorful events and personalities in France, but also showing the European and Western context and impact of the revolution and Napoleon. Illustrated accounts cover such "great days" as the storming of the Bastille, the fall of Robespierre, and Napoleon's Coup of 18 Brumaire, and great battles. Main periods are: the origins of the revolution (economic, social, political, intellectual); revolution and reconstruction (1789-92); through terror to Thermidor (Jacobins and sans-culottes); Napoleon's wars and reconstruction (France and Europe). Cinema, slides and martial music periodically. Discussion of major authors and interpretations.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5516.

HISTORY 417R Nations & Empires:19th Century Europe Credits: 3

This upper-division course will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture in 19th century Europe, paying particular attention to the rise of modern ideologies and identities, world hegemony, and the social technologies of dehumanization that foreshadowed the unprecedented inhumanities of the 20th century.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5517.

HISTORY 418R The Age of Extremes 20th Century History Credits: 3

This upper-division course traces the history of Europe in the 20th century. It will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture, paying particular attention to the issues of modernity and post modernity, imperialism and decolonization, dehumanization and genocide as well as the role of ordinary people in these systems of mass destruction.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5518.

HISTORY 419R Contemporary Europe: 1930-2000 Credits: 3

This upper-division course traces the history of Europe in the period of living memory. It will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture, paying particular attention to the rise of globalization and the condition of postmodernity, decolonization and neocolonization, European unification and everyday life.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5519.

HISTORY 420CC World War I in Film: The World made Modern Credits: 3

This cluster course examines World War I and its legacy through the lenses of international history and film studies. It explores the origins and conduct of the "Great War," as it was called at the time, as well as its transforming effects on the modern international relations and the ongoing process of globalization. It also examines how the war spurred the growth of an infant motion picture industry, and how movies produced during the decades that followed helped shaping popular memories of the conflict-reflecting and shaping cultural discourses regarding the myth or reality of modern civilizational progress; the ethics of modern weaponry; the individual's placed in mass society; constructions of class, race, and gender; and the meaning of national identify in a globalizing world. The class will draw on selected history texts and an array of films and film clips.

HISTORY 425R European Criminal Justice History, 500-1900 Credits: 3

This course will survey European crime, criminal procedure, policing and punishment between 500 and 1900. Particular attention will be given to changing methods of proof (oaths, ordeals, juries); changing type of criminal activity (banditry, vagrancy, witchcraft, professional theft) and changing penal strategies (the stocks, breaking on the wheel, the workhouse, the prison, the penitentiary). English experiences are emphasized.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5525R.

HISTORY 426R The Scientific Revolution, 1500-1700 Credits: 3

An analysis of the intellectual and social currents which culminated in the Scientific Revolution. After presenting the Renaissance world view, the course will examine the influence of humanism, art, religion, and the voyages of discovery on science, as a prelude to understanding the achievements of Galileo, Harvey, Newton, and the scientific societies of the 17th century.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5526R.

HISTORY 427R The Darwinian Revolution, 1650-1900 Credits: 3

An inquiry into the intellectual background of Darwin's "Origin of Species." The course will examine 18th- and 19th-century attitudes toward time, species, change, race, the age of the earth, the nature of fossils, creation, and evolution, as background to understanding the achievement of Darwin and the reception of his work.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5527.

HISTORY 428A History Of The Body Credits: 3

This advanced course will explore the new field of the history of the body, with particular attention to sexuality and gender. Topics will include the history of sexualities, the body and society, body disciplines, medical practices and representations of illness, beauty and fashion, and the relationship between sexualities and nationalisms.

HISTORY 428B Gender & Medicine: Patients & Practitioners From Antiquity to Present Credits: 3

This course explores, in a selective fashion, the role of women in Western medicine both as health care providers and patients. The subject of the history of medicine is too broad to be covered comprehensively in a semester, and so we will focusing on diseases or physical conditions which were believed to be limited to women--childbirth, certain mental health conditions, reproductive health, breast cancer-- as well as the increasing marginalization of women within the profession of health care providers to those branches concerned primarily with "women's problems.

HISTORY 430RA 'We Are The Dead': The Great War Experience Through its Artifacts Credits: 3

World War One was the "war to end all wars"; all previous wars were indeed eclipsed by its scale of destruction. And yet, it was a war that initiated a century of continual bloodshed and crimes against humanity. This course will explore the causes, nature and consquences of the Great War of 1914-18. It will be taught on different themes each Winter semester at the National World War One Memorial Museum at Liberty Memorial.

HISTORY 431R Medieval England, 1066 To 1485 Credits: 3

Beginning with the Norman conquest of England in 1066, this course traces the history of Medieval England through the establishment of the Tudor dynasty. Covered will be such items as the rise of the Angevin Empire, the conflict between monarch & nobility, the evolution of Parliament, as well as the Anglo-French rivalry which culminated in the Hundred Years' War.

HISTORY 432R Tudor England, 1485-1603 Credits: 3

This course covers England from the accession of Henry VII, the first Tudor, to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603 Topics to be covered are: transformation of England into a modern state, the Reformation, the role of Parliament, conflicts with European powers, especially Spain, etc.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5532.

HISTORY 433R History of Britain 1603-1832 Credits: 3

This course surveys the history of Britain from the the rise of the Stuart dynasty through the Industrial Revolution, with particular emphasis on the cultural aspects of political, social, economic, and military changes. Topics include: the domination of the aristocracy; the rise of the Navy; the exploration of the Pacific; the monarchy of George III; the loss of the American colonies; the wars with Napoleon; the Agricultural and early Industrial Revolutions; and the social changes they brought in both Britain and the Empire.

HISTORY 434R History of Britain 1832-Present Credits: 3

This course surveys the history of the British Isles from the industrial revolution to the present day, with a particular emphasis on the cultural aspects of political, social, economic, and military changes. Topics include Victorian society, the rise of the class system, imperialism, the domestic impact of the two world wars, the reaction to the loss of the Empire, pop culture, and contemporary issues.

HISTORY 436R Modern German History Credits: 3

This course traces the history of Central Europe from the fall of Bismarck to the reunification of Germany one century later. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society, elites and 'ordinary' Germans, in the various German-speaking regimes that existed over the course of this era: two empires, two interwar republics, two fascist dictatorships, and three post-fascist republics. All assigned readings will be in English; a background knowledge of European history is recommended.

HISTORY 437AWI Imperial Germanies, 1848-1918 Credits: 3

This course traces the history of German-speaking Central Europe from the Revolutions of 1848 to the collapse of the Hohenzollern and Habsburg empires at the end of World War One. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society and the role played by 'elite' and 'ordinary' people in shaping German history. This reading and writing intensive course will be run as a seminar. Final grades will be based on a portfolio of assignments of which students will select what they consider to be the best examples of their work.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 202, HISTORY 208 (or equivalent).

HISTORY 437BWI First German Republics, 1917-1935 Credits: 3

This course traces the history of the two German Republics during the inter-war years-the First Austrian Republic and the so-called Weimar Republic-from the peace movements of the First World War to the solidification of fascist dictatorships. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society and the role played by "elite" and "ordinary" people in shaping German history. This reading-and writing-intensive course will be run as a seminar. Final grades will be based on a portfolio of assignment of which students will select what they consider to be the best portfolio of assignments of which students will select what they consider to bet the best examples of their work.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 202, HISTORY 208 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

HISTORY 437CWI The Third Reich, 1930-1950 Credits: 3

This course traces the history of the Third Reich--its origins, nature, and crimes against humanity--from its first electoral successes in the Great Depression to the trials of its leaders for various war crimes. At its center stand the challenging questions of the ethical and historical responsibility for the Holocaust. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society and the roles played by 'elite' and 'ordinary' people in shaping this tragic era of German and European history. This reading- and writing-intensive course will be run as a seminar. Final grades will be based on a portfolio of assignments o which students will select what they consider to be the best examples of their work.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 202, HISTORY 208 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

HISTORY 437DWI Cold War Germanies, 1941-1991 Credits: 3

This course traces the history of the three postwar German Republics-- the Second Austrian Republic, the German Democratic Republic, and the Federal Republic of Germany -- from the initial plans of the Allies for postwar reconstruction to the Reunification of Germany in 1991. It will ask students to think critically about relationship between state and society and the role played by 'elite' and ' ordinary' people in shaping, and in the remembering, of German history. This reading-and writing-intensive course will be run as a seminar. Final grades will be based on a portfolio of assignments of which students will select what they consider to be the best examples of their work.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 202, HISTORY 208 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

HISTORY 444R Islam and the Arabs: The Formative Period Credits: 3

The first semester of a three-semester sequence begins with a brief overview of the geography and topography of the Middle East. The course proceeds with a discussion of the conditions of pre-Islamic Arabia; the appearance of Muhammad and his mission; the rise and spread of Islam; the establishment and consolidation of the Arab dynasties in the Middle East, North Africa and Spain; Islamic institutions; and Islamic society and culture. The time span will be approximately 500 A.D. to the Mongol conquest of Baghdad in 1258.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5544.

HISTORY 445 The Ottoman Empire in the Middle East to World War I Credits: 3

The second semester of a three-semester sequence covers the transition from Arab to Turkish hegemony in most of the Middle East as well as the restoration of native Persian dynasties in Iran and their subsequent development. The emphasis is on the rise and decline of the Ottoman Turkish Empire. Attention is given to the Ottoman provinces and to the national movements of subject peoples. The course ends with an overview of World War I and the peace treaties which marked the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5545.

HISTORY 446R The Middle East from World War I to the Present Credits: 3

The third semester of a three-semester sequence deals with the emergence of the modern countries of the Middle East after World War I and their history and course of development to the present day. There will be a general survey of the government and politics, economic situation, and social and cultural characteristics of each important country in the area. In addition, special topics will be discussed such as the modernization process, ideological alternatives, relations with the great powers, the economics and politics of oil, and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5546.

HISTORY 462J Japanese Civilization Credits: 3

A survey of Japanese civilization and cultural history from the prehistorical period to the present. Emphasis on the interplay between religion, the arts, politics, and social structure.

HISTORY 464 Medieval Methods and Paleography Credits: 3

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of medieval handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will examine the historical and cultural settings for medieval texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textural transmission in the medieval world. In addition to gaining familiarity with the many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal, and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for practical archival work in various European nations.

Prerequisites: LATIN 110.

HISTORY 468R Archaeology and the History of Antiquity Credits: 3

This course will analyze the contributions of archaeology to the understanding of ancient history. It will cover archaeological excavations and their pertinence to classical civilization in the Near East and Greece. The techniques and methodology of field archaeologists will be discussed and demonstrated. Archaeological excavations relating to the Hittite capital, to the Ugaritic tablets, to the Minoan-Mycenaean civilization and its link to the Near East will be treated.

HISTORY 469 Archeology and Biblical History Credits: 3

An examination of ancient Israel as she emerges from the ruins of the past, both lapidary and literary. Through a study of the "mute documents," artifacts man-made (storied cities, household utensils, inscribed shards from Jericho to Jerusalem) we gain an insight indispensable for Biblical studies, for ancient Near Eastern history.

HISTORY 470 Ancient Egypt Credits: 3

This course describes the political, social and cultural evolution of ancient Egypt from pre-dynastic times, with major emphasis upon the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms (especially the 18th dynasty and the reign of Akhenaton).

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5570R.

HISTORY 470P Ancient World: The Social History Of The Ancient World Credits: 4

The optional four-credit-hour component (modified independent study) will concern the social aspects of these civilizations, i.e., their daily lives. Readings and audiovisual aids will be used to help the student who will be expected to choose one aspect of each civilization, such as women, slavery, merchants, education, medicine, etc., and write a five-page paper about that topic for each period, i.e., Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome.

HISTORY 471 Ancient Greece Credits: 3

This course begins with a survey of the pre-classical Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations and then describes the rise of prominent Greek city-states (with particular emphasis upon the evolution of Sparta and the political, social and cultural contributions of Athens). The course concludes with the rise of Macedon and Alexander's conquests and significance.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5571R.

HISTORY 471P Ancient World: The Political Structure Of The Ancient World Credits: 4

The four-hour lecture period on weeknights will emphasize the historical aspects of the ancient civilizations. The lectures will be chronologically organized to focus upon their evolution from their rise to their collapse.

HISTORY 472 Ancient Rome Credits: 3

This course covers Roman history from its origins (including the Etruscans) to the decline of the imperial system. Particular emphasis is placed upon the political, social and economic developments in the Republic, the death of the Republic, the early Principate, and the factors that led to Rome's decline in the ancient world.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5572R.

HISTORY 472P Ancient World: The Cul/Intellectual Dimension Of Ancient Civi Credits: 4

The four weekend periods will provide the students with a general picture of these civilizations: society, religion, economics, and culture (w.f., arts, literature, philosophy, science, etc.). Guest lecturers, slides, films and video cassettes will be used to introduce the varied aspects of these ancient peoples.

HISTORY 474 Late Antiquity: The transformation of the Mediterranean World (200–600 AD) Credits: 3

The decline of the Roman Empire and the barbarian invasions transformed the Mediterranean and European worlds, forming the foundation of Europe and the Islamic world. Students will investigate the multicultural society of Late Antiquity and become familiar with the primary sources for the period.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 474, HISTORY 5574.

HISTORY 475WI The History of Ancient Israel Credits: 3

Judaism has had a tremendous impact on our civilization and yet most Americans are only dimly aware of its origins and development. This course will trace the roots of the Jewish religion in its historical context from its beginnings through the formation of rabbinic culture. The rise of Christianity will be examined in its original Judaic context, and recent discoveries, particularly those pertaining to the Dead Sea Scrolls, will be interpreted.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

HISTORY 476 Medieval Jewish History Credits: 3

This course covers the general period from the decline of the Roman Empire to the dawn of early modern times. It is concerned with Jewish centers of life and learning in the Diaspora, both East and West. The course considers the Jews under Islamic rule from the time of Mohammed through the Golden Age of Moorish Spain. The focus then shifts to the situation of the Jews in Christian Europe, from the period of Constantine to the expulsions from England, France and Christian Spain. The Jews in the Ottoman Empire are mentioned and the course ends with the episode of Sabbatai Zevi, the false Messiah.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5576R.

HISTORY 477 Modern Jewish History Credits: 3

This course surveys modern Jewish history from the Napoleonic period to World War II. Analyzing the social status of the Jews in Medieval Europe, it proceeds towards a discussion of the growth of the national state and the breakup of the Holy Roman Empire and analyzes the growth of socialism, integral nationalism, and liberalism as they affected the Jewish communities in Europe and America. The course serves as a survey of modern political and economic trends as they affect a distinct group.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5577R.

HISTORY 494 #Heartlandia: Digital Histories of the Midwest Credits: 3

What is the Midwest? The course will consider the political, economic, and religious history of mid-America in order to define the Midwest. Students will collaboratively contribute to an ongoing digital history project like a podcast or virtual exhibit, gaining an understanding of the region as well as new technical skills.

HISTORY 496 Historical Research Project Credits: 1-3

Working extensively with an individual faculty member actively engaged in his/her research, students practice the multiple facets of investigating the sources of history, developing a comprehensive analysis from such sources, and composing a persuasive interpretation.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 301WI.

HISTORY 497 Special Topics and Readings Credits: 1-6

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

HISTORY 497XCA Special Topics and Readings Credits: 1-6

Special Topics and Readings

HISTORY 498WI Senior Capstone Credits: 3

This is the capstone course in the department and is required for majors in the senior year. It consists of tutorial sessions with a regular faculty member and independent research leading to a major paper using original source materials. Performance in this course will weigh heavily in the award of departmental honors.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 301WI, RooWriter.

HISTORY 5500B Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500BB Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500C Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500CL Cluster Course:Nordic Culture Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500CP Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500CY Cluster Course: The Ancient World And The Cinema Credits: 3

This course will explore the tradition of depicting the ancient Mediterranean world in film from the early silent era to the present. Topics to be covered include the ways that filmmakers respond to literary and historical sources from the ancient world, interact with the artistic tradition of films about the ancient world, the relation of these films to other works by the same creative personnel (directors, actors, writers, producers, etc.), and the political and cultural contexts in which the films were released.

HISTORY 5500CZ Special Studies History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500D Special Topics in History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500E Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500G Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500GB Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500GR Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500H Special Topics In History For Graduate Students Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500JCA Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500LA Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500P Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500R Special Topics in History for Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 400.

HISTORY 5500RC Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500RD Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500RJ Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500SS Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500W Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500Z Special Studies: Labor In Industrial America Credits: 3

This course examines the history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1877 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement, the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers' relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

HISTORY 5501A Religion in America Credits: 3

An in-depth examination of selected aspects of the history of religions in America from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis will be given to methodological issues in the study of American religious history.

HISTORY 5502 America,1000-1763: The Formative Era Credits: 3

Early American history emcompasses the formative era of many institutions and attitudes which still persist in present-day America. A study of how these patterns and policies emerged will enlighten us as to our current ways our society seeks to adapt to change.

HISTORY 5503 America, 1763-1783: The Revolutionary Heritage Credits: 3

The American Revolution created American history by creating a new nation. What the American Revolution was depends to a large extent upon what Americans think they are or ought to be. The goals of this course, therefore, are twofold: (1) to probe the nature, causes and consequences of the American Revolution; (2) to assess the intentions and behavior of both the Framers of the Constitution in 1763-1783 and the inheritors of modern America.

HISTORY 5504 America, 1783-1828: The National Experience Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 304.

HISTORY 5505 America, 1828-1852: The Jacksonian Period Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 305.

HISTORY 5506 America, 1850-1877: Civil War and Reconstruction Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 306.

HISTORY 5506A History of Christianity to Middle Ages Credits: 3

This course examines the historical and theological development of Christianity from its origins to the High Middle Ages. The main themes follow the mechanisms and conditions shaping Christianity's expansion into a major social, institutional, and intellectual force with a focus on pattern of crisis and reform. This course is based on the study of primary sources (both texts and objects) and modern scholarship.

HISTORY 5507 America 1877-1917: Development of Industrial America Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 307.

HISTORY 5507A The History of Christianity from the Middle Ages to the Present Credits: 3

This course examines the historical and theological development of Christianity from the High Middle Ages to the present. The main themes follow the mechanisms and conditions shaping Christianity's expansion into a major social, institutional and intellectual force with a focus on patterns of crisis and reform. This course is based on the study of primary sources ( both texts and objects) and modern scholarship.

HISTORY 5508A America 1914-1945: The Era of the World Wars Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 308B.

HISTORY 5508B America 1945-Present: Our Times Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 308B.

HISTORY 5511 Medieval Civilization I Credits: 3

Medieval Civilization I

HISTORY 5512 Medieval Civilization II Credits: 3

Medieval Civilization II

HISTORY 5512A Medieval Women & Children Credits: 3

This course explores the roles of women in the social, economic, political, and cultural environments of medieval and early modern Europe. We examine the lives of women in all areas of life, from the ordinary to the extraordinary, in urban and rural environments, from the centers of religious and political power to the margins of society. Focus will be on the world of work for urban and peasant women and on the social and legal institutions of marriage, kinship, and the family. The course makes extensive use of primary source by and about women during this period.

HISTORY 5512B The Black Death And Late Medieval Society Credits: 3

This course examines all aspects of late medieval and early Renaissance society in Western Europe. The Back Death of 1348/1349 serves as the entry point into the historical study of the economy, demography, and culture during this transitional period.

HISTORY 5513 Renaissance Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 413.

HISTORY 5514 Reformation Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 414.

HISTORY 5515B 17Th And 18Th Century European History Credits: 3

This course is designed to present the upper-division undergraduate with a firm grasp of the major intellectual, cultural, political and economic development of 17th and 18th century Europe. It considers the bitter Thirty Years War in Century Europe, the rise of the Netherlands, the fall of Italy and Spain, the rise of constitutional and absolutist styles of government, the scientific revolution, the colonization by Europeans of the Pacific and Indian Ocean Basins, Enlightenment political philosophy, the Agricultural Revolution, and the French Revolution. Also offered for undergraduates as 415B. Graduate students will be held to a higher standard in terms of additional, in-depth historiographic research, writing, and discussion.

HISTORY 5516 The French Revolution and Napoleon Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 416R.

HISTORY 5517 19th Century European History Credits: 3

This upper-division course will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture in 19th century Europe, paying particular attention to the rise of modern ideologies and identities, world hegemony, and the social technologies of dehumanization that foreshadowed the unprecedented inhumanities of the 20th century. Graduates will be held to a higher standard in terms of additional, in-depth historiographic research, writing, and discussion.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 417R.

HISTORY 5518 20th Century European History Credits: 3

This upper-division course traces the history of Europe in the 20th century. It will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture, paying particular attention to the issues of modernity and postmodernity, imperialism and decolonization, dehumanization and genocide as well as the role of ordinary people in these systems of mass destruction. Graduate students will be held to a higher standard in terms of additional, in-depth historiographic research, writing, and discussion.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 418R.

HISTORY 5519 Contemporary European History: 1950-2000 Credits: 3

This upper-division course traces the history of Europe in the period of living memory. It will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics social relations and culture, paying particular attention to the rise of globalization and the condition of postmodernity, decolonization and neo-colonization, European unification and everyday life. Graduate students will be held to a higher standard in terms of additional, in-depth historiographic research, writing, and discussion.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 419R.

HISTORY 5525R European Criminal Justice History, 500-1900 Credits: 3

This course will survey European crime, criminal procedure, policing and punishment between 500 and 1900. Particular attention will be given to changing methods of proof (oaths, ordeals, juries); changing type of criminal activity (banditry, vagrancy, witchcraft, professional theft) and changing penal strategies (the stocks, breaking on the wheel, the workhouse, the prison, the penitentiary). English experiences are emphasized.

HISTORY 5526 Modern Latin America Credits: 3

This course studies social, political, economic and cultural trends in Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Discussion topics include nation building after Independence with an emphasis on gender and race in the creation of national identities and new forms of social stratification; integration of national economies into the world economic system; the expansion of political participation and citizenship; immigration (national and transnational) and the tensions caused by the forces of modernization and tradition. Although the purpose of the course is to provide a general background for a large and diverse region (more than 20 countries), case studies from Argentina, Mexico and Brazil will illustrate the above-mentioned themes and will provide the basis for a comparative regional perspective.

HISTORY 5526R The Scientific Revolution 1500-1700 Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 426R.

HISTORY 5527 The Darwinian Revolution, 1650-1900 Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 427R.

HISTORY 5528A History Of The Body Credits: 3

This advanced course will explore the new field of the history of the body, with particular attention to sexuality and gender. Topics will include the history of sexualities, the body and society, body disciplines, medical practices and representations of illness, beauty, and fashion, and the relationship between sexualities and nationalisms.

HISTORY 5528B Women & Medicine:Patients & Practitioners From Antiquity-Present Credits: 3

This course explores, in a selective fashion, the role of women in Western Medicine both as health care providers and patients. The subject of the history of medicine is too broad to be covered comprehensively in a semester, and so we will focus on diseases or physical conditions which were believed to be limited to women-childbirth, certain mental health conditions, reproductive health, breast cancer-as well as the increasing marginalization of women within the profession of health care providers to those branches concerned primarily with "women's problems.

HISTORY 5531 Medieval England, 1066 to 1485 Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 431R.

HISTORY 5532 Tudor-England, 1485-1688 Credits: 3

This course covers the history of England from the accession of Henry VII in 1485 to the crowning of William and Mary in the Glorious Revolution. Its main emphasis is the Tudor dynasty 1485-1603 with special reference to the transformation of England into a modern state, Re-Reformation, the role of Parliament, etc. The course concludes with the major characteristics of the early Stuart period.

HISTORY 5533 History of Britain 1603-1832 Credits: 3

This course analyzes the rise and fall of the Stuart dynasty and the effects of civil war, rebellion, and religious turmoil on the peoples of Britain. The domination of politics and culture by the aristocracy in the eighteenth century is examined. The rise of the Navy due to constant warfare and the exploration of the Pacific are discussed. The monarchy of George III, the loss of the American colonies, and the wars with Napoleon are examined. Finally, the Agricultural and early Industrial Revolutions are considered through an analysis of the social changes they brought in Britain and the Empire

HISTORY 5536 Modern German History: 1890-1990 Credits: 3

This course traces history of Central Europe from the fall of Bismarck to the reunification of Germany one century later. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society, elites and 'ordinary' Germans, in the various German-speaking regimes that existed over the course of this era: two empires, two interwar republics, two fascist dictatorships, and three post-fascist republics. All assigned readings will be in English; a background knowledge of European history is recommended.

HISTORY 5537 Nazi Germany Credits: 3

Nazi Germany

HISTORY 5544 Islam & the Arabs: The Formative Period Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 444R.

HISTORY 5545 The Ottoman Empire in the Middle East to WWI Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 445.

HISTORY 5546 The Middle East from World War I to the Present Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 446R.

HISTORY 5548 Missouri/Kansas Border Wars Credits: 3

This course explores the history of the Civil War on the Missouri/Kansas border, where residents first shed blood over the issue slavery. An exploration of this most uncivil of wars provides insight into the ways in which societies can be fragmented by ideology and ultimately rebuilt upon different lines.

Prerequisites: undergraduate degree.

HISTORY 5552 Latin American History through the Movies Credits: 3

This course explores the national cinemas and film industries of various regions in Latin America. Students will analyze films both as artistic endeavors and as sociological documents that provie a window into the socio-historical context of the nation in question. This course will also examine the history of Latin American cinema from the beginnngs of sound to present.

HISTORY 5554 Women in Modern America Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 354R.

HISTORY 5556 Rise of the City in the U.S. Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 356.

HISTORY 5556R Kansas City: History of a Regional Metropolis Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 356R.

HISTORY 5557 The American West Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 357.

HISTORY 5558 Black Civil Rights in the 20th and 21st Centuries Credits: 3

This course examines the fight for black civil rights in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries, focusing on the Jim Crow period, the fight to end segregation, and the enduring problem of race in the United States.

HISTORY 5558R History of the American South Credits: 3

History of the American South

HISTORY 5559 World War II Film and Propaganda Credits: 3

This course examines film and propaganda, including posters, political cartoons, speeches, and other media, created in prewar or wartime conditions by both the Allies and Axis powers from 1933 to 1945 as it affected World War II.

HISTORY 5559R The Confederacy and the Myth of the Lost Cause Credits: 3

The Confederacy and the Myth of the Lost Cause

HISTORY 5561R American Foreign Relations Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 361.

HISTORY 5562J Japanese Civilization Credits: 3

A survey of Japanese civilization and cultural history from the prehistorical period to the present. Emphasis on the interplay between religion, the arts, politics, and social structure.

HISTORY 5563R Military History of the U.S. Credits: 3

Military History of the U.S.

HISTORY 5566R American Economic History Since 1865 Credits: 3

The course deals with the emergence of Industrial America since 1865. It will cover the rise to dominance of the large modern corporation, with the problem of economic and social instability and stability, with the rise of trade associations, cartels, and government regulation in an unstable economy, and with the evolution of American economic policy and national economic planning.

HISTORY 5566RR American Labor History Credits: 3

This course examines the history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1750 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement, the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers' relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

HISTORY 5569 Women and Work in Early America Credits: 3

This course examines the ways in which gender, race, region, and class have shaped the historical experiences of American women. Students will trace women’s lives from pre-European contact to 1877 through an examination of a wide variety of social, cultural, economic, and political forces and factors.

HISTORY 5570 Introduction to Material Culture Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 370.

HISTORY 5570R Ancient Egypt Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 470.

HISTORY 5571 American History Through Film Credits: 3

This course will move through the twentieth century and highlight major themes and developments that reveal the contours of American history as depicted in film. Students will examine the ways in which filmmakers have presented history, paying particular attention to the presentation of political, cultural, and social conflicts.

HISTORY 5571R Ancient Greece Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 471.

HISTORY 5572R Ancient Rome Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 472.

HISTORY 5573R History of Astronomy Credits: 3

History of Astronomy

HISTORY 5574 Late Antiquity: The Transformation of the Mediterranean World (200-600 AD) Credits: 3

The decline of the Roman Empire and the barbarian invasions transformed the Mediterranean and European worlds, forming the foundation of Europe and the Islamic world. Students will investigate the multicultural society of Late Antiquity and become familiar with the primary sources for the period.

HISTORY 5575 Ancient Israel Credits: 3

Judaism has had a tremendous impact on our civilization and yet most Americans are only dimly aware of its origins and development. This course will trace the roots of the Jewish religion in its historical context from its beginning through the formation of rabbinic culture. The rise of Christianity will be examined in its original Judaic context, and recent discoveries, particularly those pertaining to the Dead Sea Scrolls, will be interpreted.

HISTORY 5575R The History of Ancient Israel Credits: 3

The History of Ancient Israel

HISTORY 5576R Medieval Jewish History Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 476.

HISTORY 5577R Modern Jewish History Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 477.

HISTORY 5578R The Holocaust and the State of Israel Credits: 3

The Holocaust and the State of Israel

HISTORY 5579 Public History: Theory and Method Credits: 3

This course explores the theoretical and methodological challenges that surround the public preservation and presentation of history in spaces like museums and historical societies. Students will learn the skills professionals use to communicate historical scholarship to wider audiences and will grapple with the issues around expanding history's stakeholders.

HISTORY 5580 The History Of The American South I Credits: 3

A study of the political, intellectual, cultural, economic, and social development of the American South up to and including the Civil War. Special topics discussed will e the plantation system , slavery, abolition, secession, the Confederacy and the interaction of the region with the nation.

HISTORY 5581 Research Methodologies Credits: 3

An introduction to a variety of research tools and techniques including such topics as evidence, critical method, verification, bibliography, book review, computers, statistics, and archival methods.

HISTORY 5581GR How To - History I Credits: 3

This foundational course in the doing of history will use the "great books" of historical scholarship to introduce graduate students to historical questions, methods, theories, and rhetorical strategies. The goal of the course is for the student to learn how to engage in historical criticism and formulate historical questions for themselves. This required course must be taken in the first year of graduate study in history.

HISTORY 5582 Colloquium In American History I Credits: 3

These courses are designed to acquaint the graduate student with the writings and theories of major American historians. Faculty lectures are combined with student bibliographical essays and the reading of important historical works in order to prepare the student for the final examination taken upon completion of M.A. course work. Books read in the course compose a large proportion of the departmental reading list.

HISTORY 5582GR How To - History II Credits: 3

This foundational course in the doing of history will introduce graduate students to professional obligations and research methodologies of academic historians. Pragmatic in focus, it will prepare students for all stages of research and teaching through all aspects of an historical career from graduate school to full professorship or other directions. This required course must be taken in the first year of graduate study in history and it fulfills the SGS recommendation for ethical instruction.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 5581GR.

HISTORY 5583 Colloquium In American History II Credits: 3

These courses are designed to acquaint the graduate student with the writings and theories of major American historians. Faculty lectures are combined with student bibliographical essays and the reading of important historical works in order prepare the student for the final examination taken upon completion of M.A. course work. Books read in the course compose a large proportion of the departmental reading list.

HISTORY 5583GR Medieval Methods & Paleography Credits: 3

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in these fields. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course examines the historical and cultural settings for texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textual transmission in the medieval and early modern world. In addition to gaining familiarity with many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal, and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for archival work in various European nations.

HISTORY 5584R Colloquium In European History I Credits: 3

The European History Colloquium I will examine some of the crucial problems or watersheds in European history from antiquity through the Reformation. Course requirements include weekly discussions on specific topics and a research paper or project due by the end of the semester.

HISTORY 5585 Colloquium In European History II Credits: 3

The European History Colloquium II will examine some of the crucial problems or watersheds in European history from the Reformation through the 20th century. The course seeks to provide an in-depth study of specific topics and of the associated bibliography.

HISTORY 5585GR Colloquium in U.S. History Credits: 3

Students read broadly in the historiography of a particular historical problem, place, period, or specialization in U.S. History in order to master the relevant literature and hone their skills of historical criticism.

Co-requisites: HISTORY 5581GR.

HISTORY 5586GR Colloquium in World History Credits: 3

Students read broadly in the historiography of a particular historical problem, place, period, or specialization in world history in order to master the relevant literature and hone their skills of historical criticism.

Co-requisites: HISTORY 5581GR.

HISTORY 5587R Research Seminar Credits: 3

Students in this course will produce a major research paper under the direction of the instructor: a self-contained thesis chapter, an article for publication or the equivalent.

HISTORY 5587RA Research Seminar Credits: 3

HISTORY 5587RB Research Seminar Credits: 3

HISTORY 5590 History Of The American South II Credits: 3

A study of the political, intellectual, cultural, economic, and social development of the American South since the Civil War. Topics discussed will be the molding of a "New South,: twentieth century internal developments and the interaction of the region with the nation.

HISTORY 5591 Archival Methods Credits: 3

HISTORY 5592 Public History Internship Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5593 Museum Studies Credits: 3

This course is designed to acquaint students with specific careers in museums and historical agencies; to introduce students to the wide range of operating issues facing those working in the museum profession on a day-to-day basis; and to familiarize students with the organizations, reference works and resources available to develop the skills and training required for those who choose to make this their profession.

HISTORY 5594 Public History and New Media Credits: 3

This course provides students with an understanding of how new media can advance the work of cultural heritage. While contributing to an ongoing digital project, the course will consider how historians utilize digital technology to analyze primary sources as well as how museums use social media to reach broader audiences.

HISTORY 5597 Non-Thesis Research/Reading Credits: 1-6

Individual direction of student reading or research by selected, consenting faculty. This course can be taken only when faculty supervision is unavailable in colloquia or seminars.

HISTORY 5599R Thesis Credits: 1-6

A contribution to knowledge based upon extensive research and reflective of careful analysis. Before writing a thesis, the student must clear the topic and research design with the Supervisory committee.

HISTORY 5680 Doctoral Colloquium Credits: 3

This course will examine the writings and theories of major historians in a particular field of history. The authors, works and intellectual currents which form the basis of the colloquium will vary from semester to semester, depending upon the professor's expertise and design for the course.

HISTORY 5687 Doctoral Research Seminar Credits: 3

Students in this course will produce a major research paper under the direction of the instructor. This shall consist of a self-contained chapter of the dissertation or a work of publishable quality. May be repeated for credit.

HISTORY 5687RB Doctoral Research Seminar Credits: 3

Students in this course will produce a major research paper under the direction of the instructor. This shall consist of a self-contained chapter of the dissertation or a work of publishable quality. May be repeated for credit.

HISTORY 5697 Doctoral-Level Independent Reading Credits: 1-6

Individual reading under the supervision of members of the History Doctoral Faculty in preparation for the Comprehensive Examination for the Ph.D.

HISTORY 5699R Dissertation Credits: 1-15

Course credits in dissertation.

HISTORY 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

HISTORY 5990 Capstone Credits: 1-6

HISTORY H497 Special Topics and Readings Credits: 1-6

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

Humanities, General Courses

HMNTY 105P Literature, Composition & Critical Thinking: Individual & Society Credits: 4

This course develops facility in writing, reading and critical thinking through numerous writing and critical thinking activities, papers and readings focused around the topic of the relationship of the individual and society. This course accomplishes the purposes and fulfills the requirement of the first semester of freshman English.

HMNTY 202P The Meaning of the American Experience Credits: 4

This course meets the College requirement for ENGLISH 225. Integrated with the other courses in the block, its aim is to help students to become informed writers on the topics of American myths. The first part of the course will require students to write personal response papers; the second half will involve library research that can be synthesized into research papers.

HMNTY 5510 Methods in Critical Theory Credits: 3

Course introduces students to influential modern techniques of reading and interpretation, not only of literature but also of culture or visual art. Methods will themselves be seen in historical and social context, and theoretical texts may be subject to rhetorical analysis. Undergraduates only with instructor’s permission

Pace - Interdiscip Studies Courses

INT-DISC 380P People With Special Needs: Education Planning Credits: 4

This course will address educational and psychological assessment strategies that result in a diagnosis of disability. Various specific disabilities and legal parameters for public education of people with disabilities will be discussed. Students will learn how to read and understand various educational and psychological assessment reports and will become knowledgeable about how to access community supports and services to address special needs in an education setting. By the end of the course students will have created a personal notebook of educational planning and accommodations for use as a resource for parents, teachers, or students in educational settings.

INT-DISC 381P People With Special Needs: Career Exploration Credits: 4

This course will address the issues that arise in career exploration and planning for people with a disability diagnosis. Students will become familiar with the philosophy of community inclusion and will learn how to plan based upon the unique strengths and interest of the individual. Career exploration tools will be explored in class and as assigned, and students will create a personal notebook to be used as a resource tool of accommodation materials and aides.

INT-DISC 382P People With Special Needs: Disability Service Settings Credits: 4

Independent study course: Students will meet at specific times as a group with the instructor, will write a term paper, and complete a 20 hour practicum in a pre-approved disability service setting.

INT-DISC 482P The Meanings Of Masculinity In Contemporary U.S. Culture Credits: 4

Topics include: Perspectives on Masculinity; Boyhood; Collegiate Masculinities: Privilege and Peril; Men and Work; Men and Health: Body & Mind; Men in Relationships; Male Sexualities; Men in Families; Masculinities in the Media; Men, Movements, and the Future. Small and large group discussions are anticipated in the classroom. Outside of the classroom, students will be expected to complete a series of assignments that are relevant to the topics at hand. This course would ideally incorporate UMKC faculty/staff and individuals/groups outside of the university who have completed research/work that seeks to understand men's lives better.

INT-DISC 483P Artful Man Embodied: Cultural Icons of Masculinity Credits: 4

This course will examine a variety of mediums used to "embody" meanings of masculinity (with special attention paid to shifting settings for one media source can alter its meaning drastically simple by being located in a different venue and/or time). This course will incorporate tours of, and works from, the Nelson-Atkins and Kemper Museums. Images by/of "men" to be examined include those found in the work of selected "masculine icon" authors; those found in popular culture; and those found in the everyday (seemingly mundane) worlds of family, work, and medicine. As the title of the course implies, students will explore historical ideas about bodies/embodiment (be they scientific, religious, social, etc.) into their image exploration.

Pace - Integrated Studies Courses

INTGR 200 Intermediate Pre-Hospital Life Support Credits: 4

This course is designed to increase the scope of practice for the Emergency Medical Technician who is considering becoming a paramedic. It encompasses EMS operations, and the management of various medical and trauma emergencies at the Intermediate level. Note: Admitted students in the UMKC Paramedic Program.

INTGR 200L Intermediate Pre-Hospital Life Support Laboratory Credits: 2

Laboratory applications for emergency medical science.

Prerequisites: Admitted student in the UMKC Emergency Medical Services Paramedic Program.

INTGR 201 Advanced Pre-Hospital Life Support I Credits: 4

This course encompasses EMS operations, as well as roles and responsibilities. Airway management, IV therapy, and management of various medical emergencies will be addressed. Students acquire the skills necessary to perform paramedic-level skills. These skills are practiced in the laboratory and clinical setting under close supervision.

Prerequisites: INTGR 200.

INTGR 202 Advanced Pre-Hospital Life Support II Credits: 4

This course encompasses the management of patients in the prehospital setting. Students acquire skills to perform interventions in the paramedic scope of practice. Skills are practiced in the laboratory and clinical settings under supervision, and during field internship with an ambulance provider. Note: Admitted students in the UMKC Paramedic Program.

Prerequisites: INTGR 201.

Natural Science, General Courses

NAT-SCI 101P Changing Life On Earth Credits: 4

This course presents an overview of issues relating to our ever changing world. It is research oriented with papers required on topics dealing with behavior, environmental issues, and aspects of evolution.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 102P.

NAT-SCI 102P Fundamentals Of Life Science Credits: 4

This course emphasizes the essential properties of biological systems through four major themes: diversity, the chemical and physical basis of life, continuity, and the organismal nature of life.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 103P.

NAT-SCI 103P Applications Of Life Sciences Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide students with laboratory exercises, field trips, films and discussions that help apply biological principles from 102P. New concepts are introduced throughout the course.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 102P.

NAT-SCI 130 Physics of Sports Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the physics involved in different sports. Physical laws and technological developments that impact sports will be studied.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 130, PHY-SCI 130.

NAT-SCI 140 How Things Work Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the principles of operations, histories, and relationships of objects from our daily environment. The areas of investigation include mechanical and thermal objects, electromagnetism, light, special materials and nuclear energy.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 140L.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 140, PHY-SCI 140.

NAT-SCI 140L How Things Work Laboratory Credit: 1

Simple experiments based on everyday experiences are analyzed in terms of conceptual physics. The material includes elements of mechanics of a rigid body, elastic properties of matter, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics and modern physics.

Co-requisites: NAT-SCI 140.

Cross Listings: Physics 140L and Phy-Sci 140L.

NAT-SCI 150 Astronomy: Motions of the Cosmos Credits: 3

An introductory exploration of modern topics in astronomy with an emphasis on developing conceptual models for the fundamental laws of gravity and motion crucial to the formation of stars and planetary systems, the growth of black holes and galaxies, and the evolution of cosmic structure.

Cross Listings: ASTR 150, PHYSICS 150, PHY-SCI 150.

NAT-SCI 153L Introductory Astronomy Laboratory Credits: 2

An introductory exploration of astronomical phenomena and concepts through quantitative laboratory activities requiring data collection, analysis and interpretation. This course is open to students from all majors. Concurrent enrollment in either Nat-Sci 150 or Nat-Sci 155 is encouraged but not required.

Cross Listings: Phy-Sci 153L and Physics 153L.

NAT-SCI 155 Astronomy: Starlight and Star Stuff Credits: 3

An introductory exploration of modern topics in astronomy with an emphasis on developing conceptual models for the interactions between light and matter crucial to the life and death of stars, the analysis of starlight and interstellar chemistry, and the interpretation of cosmic history.

Cross Listings: ASTR 155, PHYSICS 155, PHY-SCI 155.

NAT-SCI 171 Physics For Future Presidents Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the physics they need to be informed citizens in a democracy. Energy, global warming, terrorism, and health are examples of the important topics examined from the perspective of how science should inform policy.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 171, PHY-SCI 171.

NAT-SCI 375P Nature Of Science Credits: 4

Selected topics from the natural sciences. Provides students fundamental principles and concepts of various physical and mathematical sciences. Lectures, demonstrations and discussions provide an integrated approach to the natural sciences.

NAT-SCI 425P Introduction To Quantitative Methods Credits: 3

Topics addressed are the scientific approach to study of behavior (goals of science, research terminology, variables, distributions, measures of central tendency, confidence intervals, use of research methods and ethics in research), experimental design (validity, reliability, design and sampling techniques), and interpretation of research results. Course includes in-class computer data entry and analysis.

Prerequisites: COMP-SCI 101 and MATH 110 or MATH 116

Philosophy Courses

PHILOS 210 Introduction to Philosophy Credits: 3

An introduction to many of the central problems of philosophy. The various dimensions of philosophy are examined as it related to our relationships with each other, our understanding of our world and our understanding of ourselves. Connections between classical philosophers and contemporary issues are explored as philosophy is considered as a deeply personal and also as a social phenomenon.

PHILOS 221 Contemporary Moral Issues Credits: 3

This course offers a philosophical examination of ethical issues in contemporary society. Topics for discussion include ethical conflicts arising in business and technology, engineering, healthcare, politics, and the environment. Moral concerns addressed may include reproductive rights and technologies, warfare, capital punishment, pornography, privacy, consumerism, euthanasia, sexuality, and animal welfare.

PHILOS 222 Foundations Of Logic and Scientific Reasoning Credits: 3

This course introduces the basic concepts and methods of modern logic, beginning with premise, inference, conclusion, and argument, with emphasis on understanding and reconstructing complex patterns of reasoning, and analysis and construction of valid arguments.

PHILOS 250 Special Readings In Philosophy Credits: 3

An investigation of readings on a topic, a philosophical movement, or a philosopher to be selected by the instructor. The course is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in a specific issue or person in philosophy but do not yet possess the necessary background and skill demanded of those who have taken work beyond the introductory course (s) in philosophy.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210 or PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 250A Special Readings In Philosophy Credits: 3

PHILOS 310WI Ancient Philosophy Credits: 3

A survey of the central figures of classical philosophy: the pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans and other philosophers of antiquity. The contributions of major philosophers to the development of science, religion, and social and political theories are studied.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

PHILOS 320WI History of Modern Philosophy Credits: 3

A survey of the central figures of modern philosophy: Rene Descartes, Baruch Spinoza, G.W. Liebniz, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, George Berkeley, David Hume and Immanuel Kant. In addition to the philosophical issues of the period, cultural, historical and political matters are considered. A secondary goal is the establishment of the pedigree of contemporary philosophical problems.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, or PHILOS 222 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

PHILOS 321 Ethics Credits: 3

Attention is given to the nature of ethical ideas and the development and history of ethical theory.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 221, or PHILOS 222.

PHILOS 322 Philosophy of Literature Credits: 3

A close study of the ancient problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature: what sort of truth, if any, do we find in literature? Does literature have ethical content? What makes a literary text beautiful? How do "literary" texts defer from philosophical and other kinds of texts? Should literary texts influence our thinking about politics and other social issues? We will study classic philosophers like Plato, Aristotle, Kierkegaard, and Nietzche, great literary writers such as Sappho, Dante, Goethe, Dosteovesky, and Rilke, and harder to categorize figures like Freud. The class will include the study of several recent philosophers who worked specifically on the subject of the "philosophy of literature," such as Bakhtin, Benjamin, Lacan, Szondi.

PHILOS 325 Aesthetics Credits: 3

The basic problems of aesthetics are examined, with special emphasis on the character of the work of art, the aesthetic response of the viewer, the creative process of the artist, and the nature of aesthetic criticism. These topics are discussed in light of conflicting aesthetic theories.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 329 American Philosophy Credits: 3

The main trends of American thought are covered, with special emphasis on the philosophies of Peirce, James and Dewey.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210 or PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 332 Existentialism Credits: 3

A study of the development of existentialism. Selections from the works of such thinkers as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Heidegger, Camus and other related philosophers are considered. Special attention is devoted to the existential movements in literature, social science and medicine.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 333 Social And Political Philosophy Credits: 3

A consideration of representative views of the place of man in contemporary society. Contributions in psychology, political theory, economics, sociology and anthropology are investigated philosophically with a view toward offering a critical appraisal of the nature of man in the human community.

PHILOS 335 Philosophy Of Mind Credits: 3

A study of problems arising in connection with such topics as mental phenomena, the relation of mind to body, free will and determinism, the self and personal identity, and "thinking" machines. Classical and contemporary treatments of such concepts as "mind," "intention," "sensation," "perception," "stimulus," etc., and their relation to action and behavior are considered.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 337 Philosophy Of History Credits: 3

A discussion of methodological and substantive issues, including the nature of historical explanation, whether history can be a science, and various theories of history such as those of Vico, Hegel, Marx, and Collingwood.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 340 Philosophy Of Law Credits: 3

An analysis of major philosophies of law, including methods of justifying legal systems through natural law, legal positivism, sociological jurisprudence, theology, etc. Contemporary legal theories are critically analyzed.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 370 Environmental Ethics And Policy Credits: 3

Various philosophical approaches to issues such as the value of nature, human obligations to non-human animals, species, ecosystems and future generations; environmental justice; restoration; resource use; environmental politics; and the relation between environmental issues, policy and ethics will be discussed critically.

PHILOS 431 Aristotle Credits: 3

Selected portions of Aristotle's works on logic, metaphysics, science, ethics, politics, and poetics are studied with a view to understanding Aristotle's philosophy and its position in the world of Greece and antiquity. Aristotle's philosophy is examined with reference to its place in the Western tradition and in modern philosophy.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 436 Kant Credits: 3

A study of selected writings of Immanuel Kant, with particular emphasis on the epistemological, metaphysical and ethical aspects of Kant's philosophy; an examination of Kant's significance within contemporary thought.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 445 20Th-Century Philosophy Credits: 3

A study of the development of philosophy in the 20th-Century, treating such movements as Idealism, Realism, Logical Positivism, Existentialism, Phenomenology, Pragmatism, and Analytic Philosophy.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210 or PHILOS 222.

PHILOS 448 Recent Ethical Theories Credits: 3

An analysis and investigation of modern and contemporary ethical theories. Among the theories considered are ethical relativity, the emotive theory, utilitarianism, neo Kantianism, and situation ethics.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 321.

PHILOS 451 History and Philosophy of Bioethics Credits: 3

This course will provide an overview of the history of medicine and bioethics from antiquity to the present. In addition to key historical events, the course will provide an overview of foundational ethical theories. The course will explore key events in bioethics and the responses to them in the bioethics literature.

PHILOS 452 Healthcare Law and Policy Credits: 3

This course will focus on basic issues in healthcare law and public policy. Issues such as confidentiality, informed consent, healthcare financing, and end-of-life decision making will be covered. In addition to key historical events, the course will provide an overview of foundational ethical theories. The course will explore key events in bioethics and the responses to them in the bioethics literature.

PHILOS 453 Clinical Ethics and Case Consultation Credits: 3

This course will focus on classic cases in bioethics and will expose students to contemporary trends in healthcare ethics consultation.

PHILOS 480 Selected Topics Credits: 1-3

Each time this course is offered a particular philosopher or particular area of philosophy will be the topic of discussion. The course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS 480A Selected Topics Credits: 1-3

PHILOS 480B Selected Topics Credits: 1-3

PHILOS 480E Selected Topics Credits: 1-3

PHILOS 490 Special Topics And Readings Credits: 1-3

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. By permission only. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 222, PHILOS 310WI, PHILOS 320WI, PHILOS 321.

PHILOS 490B Special Topics And Readings Credits: 1-3

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. By permission only. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 222, PHILOS 310WI, PHILOS 320WI, PHILOS 321.

PHILOS 490F Special Topics and Readings Credits: 1-3

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. By permission only. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 222, PHILOS 310WI, PHILOS 320WI, PHILOS 321.

PHILOS 5521 Managerial And Administrative Decision Making And Ethical Values Credits: 3

Methods of problem definition and decision making in ethics are presented with the goal of providing the student with a matrix for case review. A series of cases is offered that serve to integrate approaches to ethical reflection with management and administrative decision making. Cases are chosen on the basis of topical, curricular and conceptual relevance.

PHILOS 5540 Seminar On Philosophy And Law Credits: 2

An examination from a philosophical perspective of the historical and conceptual relationships present in the evolution, development and analysis of law. Among the systems of analysis examined will be natural law theory, legal positivism and legal realism. Ordinarily the seminar will focus on a specific area of controversy in the law.

PHILOS 5546 Ethics And Government Credits: 3

An examination of ethical issues related to government, with the primary focus on national and local governmental bodies in the United States. Ethics in the executive, legislative and judicial branches are examined. Ethical standards for elected officials and appointed public servants are reviewed. Attempts to "legislate morality" are considered. The course includes a historical review of ethics and government and an analysis of the legal implications of legislation regarding ethics in the executive branch.

PHILOS 5550 History and Philosophy of Bioethics Credits: 3

This course will provide an overview of the history of medicine and bioethics from antiquity to the present. In addition to key historical events, the course will provide an overview of foundational ethical theories. The course will explore key events in bioethics and the responses to them in the bioethics literature.

PHILOS 5551 Healthcare Law and Policy Credits: 3

This course will focus on basic issues in healthcare law and public policy. Issues such as confidentiality, informed consent, healthcare financing, and end-of-life decision making will be covered. In addition to key historical events, the course will provide an overview of foundational ethical theories. The course will explore key events in bioethics and the responses to them in the bioethics literature.

PHILOS 5552 Clinical Ethics and Case Consultation Credits: 3

This course will focus on classic cases in bioethics and will expose students to contemporary trends in healthcare ethics consultation.

PHILOS 5620 Descartes To Hume Credits: 3

PHILOS 5625 Aesthetics Credits: 3

PHILOS 5638 Philosophy Of Biology Credits: 3

PHILOS 5640 Philosophy Of Law Credits: 3

PHILOS 5690 Research In Selected Fields: Graduate Studies Credits: 3

Intensive research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. By permission only. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

PHILOS H310 Ancient Philosophy - Honors Credits: 3

PHILOS H320 Descartes To Hume - Honors Credits: 3

PHILOS H321 Honors: Introduction To Ethics Credits: 3

PHILOS H332 Existentialism Credits: 3

A study of the development of existentialism. Selections from the works of such thinkers as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Heidegger, Camus and other related philosophers are considered. Special attention is devoted to the existential movements in literature, social science and medicine.

Prerequisites: PHILOS 210, PHILOS 222 (or equivalent).

PHILOS H333 Social And Political Philosophy Credits: 3

A consideration of representative views of the place of man in contemporary society. Contributions in psychology, political theory, economics, sociology and anthropology are investigated philosophically with a view toward offering a critical appraisal of the nature of man in the human community. No prerequisites.

PHILOS H370 Environmental Ethics And Policy Credits: 3

Various philosophical approaches to issues such as the value of nature, human obligations to non-human animals, species, ecosystems and future generations; environmental justice; restoration; resource use; environmental politics; and the relation between environmental issues, policy and ethics will be discussed critically.

Physical Science Courses

PHY-SCI 110 Foundations Of Physical Sciences I Credits: 4

Fundamental principles and concepts of the various physical and mathematical sciences, integrated by the history and philosophy of science.

PHY-SCI 110L Foundations Of Physical Sciences, Laboratory I Credit: 1

General laboratory and discussion sessions on various topics in the physical and mathematical sciences.

PHY-SCI 130 Physics of Sports Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the physics involved in different sports. Physical laws and technological developments that impact sports will be studied.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 130 and NAT-SCI 130.

PHY-SCI 140 How Things Work Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the principles of operations, histories, and relationships of objects from our daily environment. The areas of investigation include mechanical and thermal objects, electromagnetism, light, special materials and nuclear energy.

Co-requisites: PHY-SCI 140L.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 140, NAT-SCI 140.

PHY-SCI 140L How Things Work Laboratory Credit: 1

Simple experiments based on everyday experiences are analyzed in terms of conceptual physics. The material includes elements of mechanics of a rigid body, elastic properties of matter, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics and modern physics.

Co-requisites: PHY-SCI 140.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 140L and NAT-SCI 140L.

PHY-SCI 150 Astronomy: Motions of the Cosmos Credits: 3

An introductory exploration of modern topics in astronomy with an emphasis on developing conceptual models for the fundamental laws of gravity and motion crucial to the formation of stars and planetary systems, the growth of black holes and galaxies, and the evolution of cosmic structure.

Cross Listings: ASTR 150, PHYSICS 150, NAT-SCI 150.

PHY-SCI 153L Introductory Astronomy Laboratory Credits: 2

An introductory exploration of astronomical phenomena and concepts through quantitative laboratory activities requiring data collection, analysis and interpretation. This course is open to students from all majors. Concurrent enrollment in either PHY-SCI 150 or PHY-SCI 155 is encouraged but not required.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 153L and PHY-SCI 153L.

PHY-SCI 155 Astronomy: Starlight and Star Stuff Credits: 3

An introductory exploration of modern topics in astronomy with an emphasis on developing conceptual models for the interactions between light and matter crucial to the life and death of stars, the analysis of starlight and interstellar chemistry, and the interpretation of cosmic history.

Cross Listings: ASTR 155, PHYSICS 155, NAT-SCI 155.

PHY-SCI 171 Physics For Future Presidents Credits: 3

A course intended for liberal arts students focusing on the physics they need to be informed citizens in a democracy. Energy, global warming, terrorism, and health are examples of the important topics examined from the perspective of how science should inform policy.

Cross Listings: PHYSICS 171, NAT-SCI 171.

PHY-SCI 410A Selected Topics In Contemporary Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 410B Selected Topics In Contemporary Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 410C Selected Topics in Contemporary Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 410P Selected Topics In Contemporary Science Credits: 3

Selected Topics In Contemporary Science

PHY-SCI 410PF Selected Topics In Contemporary Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 435 Selected Topics In The History Of Science Credits: 3

Selected Topics In The History Of Science

PHY-SCI 435P Selected Topics In The History Of Science Credits: 3

PHY-SCI 435PF Selected Topics In The History Of Science Credits: 3

Political Science Courses

POL-SCI 210 American Government Credits: 3

American government and politics, with special reference to the U.S. Constitution. This course meets the state requirement for study of the U.S. and Missouri Constitutions.

POL-SCI 220 Introduction To Comparative Politics Credits: 3

Introduces students to general concepts of political authority and systematically analyzes the causes and consequences of variation in political institutions, processes and policies across countries, illustrating concepts and themes with case studies of major European and Asian countries.

POL-SCI 221 Introduction to Comparative Politics and Research Credits: 3

This course introduces students to general concepts of political authority, and systematically analyzes the causes and consequences of variation in political institutions, processes and policies across countries. This course also introduces students to research in comparative politics, with students developing an independent research project.

POL-SCI 230 International Relations Credits: 3

An analysis of relations among nations, with emphasis on structures of international power, causes of war, and approaches to peace.

POL-SCI 301 Western Political Philosophy Credits: 3

An examination of the major theories of politics from Plato to today.

POL-SCI 302 Political Research And Analysis Credits: 3

This class focuses on methods of analysis used in political science research. This course also covers research plans used to gather information about politics and effective ways of utilizing that information. As advances in computing technology expand the availability of politically-driven data, it is possible to bring an increasing amount of information to bear on more questions.

POL-SCI 303 Political Behavior Credits: 3

This course will survey research on conventional and unconventional forms of mass political behavior. Topics to be discussed include campaign participation, voting behavior, public opinion, the media, and participation in protests and revolutions. This course will also cover the methodological approaches to the study of political behavior.

POL-SCI 304 Politics of Developing Countries Credits: 3

The course examines the key arguments that have been advanced to account for differences across countries in rates and levels of economic and political development.

POL-SCI 308 Parties and Interest Groups Credits: 3

Introduction to parties and interest groups in the United States and their important role in the political process. Topics include the formation, organization, activities, and impact of political parties and interest groups in American politics.

POL-SCI 309 Public Opinion Credits: 3

Explores public opinion in the United States, surveying theories and empirical research on the measurement, formation, and distribution of public opinion.

POL-SCI 313 Politics In The American States Credits: 3

A study of the structures, functions, and politics of the institutions of American state governments and an assessment of their role in the federal system. This course is particularly interested in the extent to which political economy and political culture, broadly defined, influence public policy within the states.

POL-SCI 314 Politics of Kansas City Metro Credits: 3

This course will provide an understanding of politics in urban America through a study of metropolitan Kansas City. It will discuss the relationships between local governments, their decision making process, city-county consolidation, structure of regional council of governments, forming political alliances and current political issues affecting the metropolitan area. The course will discuss the politics of issues like transportation, sports facilities, environment and economic competitiveness.

POL-SCI 315 Public Policy Credits: 3

A broad introductory overview of decision theories, governmental structures, and policy processes. Emphasis on the organizational and societal context of public formulation, implementation, and evaluation.

POL-SCI 316 Terrorism And Political Violence Credits: 3

This course explores terrorism and armed struggle from theoretical and historical perspectives, and analyzes a number of violent movements with nationalist, ideological, and religious motivations.

POL-SCI 318 Political Psychology Credits: 3

The field of political psychology is an interdisciplinary field that draws on both psychology and political science to address topics in the political world. This course will focus on a variety of topics including inter-group conflict, stereotyping and prejudice, political socialization, attitude formation and change, political communication, decision heuristics and biases, public opinion, and the future of political psychology.

POL-SCI 319 Campaigns And Elections Credits: 3

This course will examine the role of campaigns in determining the outcome of both congressional and presidential elections and the way that electoral rules structure both campaign strategies and electoral outcomes.This course focuses on topics such as the role of the media, campaign advertising, campaign financing, public opinion, registration requirements, and the role of interest groups.

POL-SCI 326 Racial & Ethnic Politics Credits: 3

This course provides an analysis of the political behavior and roles of racial and ethnic groups in the American political system. Theoretical, empirical, and practical issues of race, racism, and race relations are examined (in the political context). Public policy, electoral behavior, and political institutions are also investigated with regards to the empowerment and political incorporation of communities of color

POL-SCI 333 Social Networks in Politics Credits: 3

This class focuses on mass political behavior and social networks in the US. Particular attention will be devoted to how relations between individuals can affect political attitudes and participation. We will also consider how these individual relations combine to shape outcomes such as political attitudes, voter turnout, and election outcomes.

POL-SCI 336 American Foreign Policy Credits: 3

Understanding the contemporary debate over American foreign policy in terms of the premises and perspectives of several competing schools of thought.

POL-SCI 343 The Politics Of Social Security Credits: 3

A study of the American Social Security system, including its history, principles, and prospects for the future.

POL-SCI 348 Constitutional Law: The Federal System Credits: 3

A study of the president, congress and state governments from the perspective of the Constitution, emphasizing powers and limitations on the exercise of authority.

POL-SCI 349 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties Credits: 3

A study of civil liberties in American society, emphasizing factors and forces that restrict or enlarge their scope, as understood through constitutional interpretation.

POL-SCI 357 Western European Politics Credits: 3

This course explores democratic representation and political institutions in Western Europe.

POL-SCI 359 Latin American Politics Credits: 3

In this course we will focus on the major periods in Latin American political history since the Great Depression. This includes the pot-War period of optimism in which democratic governments promoted rapid economic development, the period of pessimism and authoritarianism from the 1960s to the 1980s, and a new democratic renewal beginning in the 1990s. We will examine the consolidating democracies that emerged in the 1990s in depth.We will also examine case studies of recently failed democracy, Venezuela, and ask why this democracy failed.

POL-SCI 360 Labor, Politics and Society Credits: 3

This course explores many aspects of unions and the labor movement in society and the vital role organized labor plays as a pillar of democratic society. Unions impact the economy, growth, and the distribution of wealth, and the impact racial and gender equality, social security health and job safety, energy and the environment, and even foreign relations. As a social movement, labor has had a major impact on American history. This course covers these topics from a labor perspective. It examines current obstacles for union organizing, recent union campaigns, labor's political role, and the relationship between labor and the media, This course is part of the Certificate Program in Labor Studies and is offered on the University of Missouri Interactive Video Network at UMKC, UMSL, and UMC.

POL-SCI 361 Global Issues in a Changing World Credits: 3

Threats to national and international securing were once dominated by military force and interstate warfare. Threats are now seen in a much broader context. Non-state, transnational actors now pose a threat to transnational business, states, and even civilizations. Issues like global climate change and HIV/AIDS are seen as threats to national survival well beyond any single nation's ability to contain. For some, the deep phenomenon of globalization is seen as a threat to national sovereignty and, indeed, a threat to the international system of states. In this course, challenges and opportunities replace threat as the organizing principle, and the role of international institutions takes center stage.

POL-SCI 362 Latin America and International Relations Credits: 3

This course we will survey the relations between Latin American states and between Latin America and the world. Taking the Latin American states as the key actors, we examine the history of US-Latin American relations, including current issues such as drug trafficking, immigration and terrorism. We will also study the region as a player on the international stage, examining Latin America's changing role in the world arena related to trade, development, and the environment. Finally we examine the emergence of new leadership in Latin America.

POL-SCI 364 Designing American Elections Credits: 3

This course examines the role of elections in American politics. Topics include voter registration, campaign finance, redistricting, the electoral college, and primary elections. We will also evaluate how different electoral rules affect political outcomes such as voter turnout, participation, and representation.

POL-SCI 365 Congress and Parliaments Credits: 3

The objective of this course is to compare the American Congress to parliaments and legislatures in other countries. The course will examine how elections and institutions affect the behavior of legislators and the policy-making process in many countries.

POL-SCI 366 British Politics Credits: 3

This course focuses on the contemporary politics of the United Kingdom, particularly elections, institutions, and political parties.

POL-SCI 369 Politics Of The Middle East Credits: 3

The course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of political systems and major political issues in the Middle East and North Africa. Topics to be covered in the course include the question of Middle east exceptionalism, democratization, the eff ect of religion and identity, political economy of the Middle East, the Arab-Israeli conflict, political violence, and the Arab Spring.

POL-SCI 370 Labor Law Credits: 3

In this course, participants will examine the role of government in the regulation of labor-management relations in the United States. While the focus of the course will be on federal laws regulating private sector labor relations, parallel issues addressed in the Railway Labor Act and state public sector labor relations law will also be covered. Specific topics include the legal framework for the organization of workers, definition of prohibited or unfair labor practices of employers and unions, legal regulation of the collective bargaining process, regulation of the use of economic weapons in labor disputes, enforcement of collective bargaining agreements and the regulation of internal trade union activities.

POL-SCI 380 Political Science And Politics Credits: 1-6

Offered as a special course in the individual faculty member's area of research specialization. The course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. The topic and instructor will be announced in advance.

POL-SCI 380A Political Science And Politics Credits: 1-6

POL-SCI 380B Political Science And Politics Credits: 1-6

POL-SCI 380C Political Science And Politics Credits: 1-6

POL-SCI 380D Political Science And Politics Credits: 1-6

POL-SCI 380E Political Science And Politics Credits: 1-6

POL-SCI 380X Political Science And Politics Credits: 1-6

POL-SCI 381 Mock Trial Credit: 1

A study of the trial process in the U.S. judicial system focusing on the structure and rules of trials, including the role of attorneys. Combination of student performance with in-class lecture and discussion.

POL-SCI 403 Political Ideology Credits: 3

A critical examination of contemporary political ideologies including democratic and authoritarian theories.

POL-SCI 404 Conflict Resolution and Cooperation Credits: 3

This course examines theories of cooperation in the international system. Students will assess the challenges to international cooperation and the means through which states and non-state actors overcome those challenges. Students will critically evaluate theories of conflict resolution and cooperation, while learning to apply those theories to current events.

POL-SCI 406 Presidential Politics Credits: 3

This course will examine the American presidency as an institution, and will analyze its role in the American political system. It will also consider the administrations of the various presidents.

POL-SCI 407 Congressional Politics Credits: 3

Focus on the U.S. Congress and its role in the political process, surveying theories and empirical research on congressional campaigns, internal procedures, and the relationship between Congress and the other branches of government.

POL-SCI 408 Judicial Politics Credits: 3

An examination of the judiciary in the American political process, emphasizing the role of judges, lawyers and the Supreme Court.

POL-SCI 424 Urban Politics and Community Power Structures Credits: 3

This course surveys and analyzes the literature covering urban politics. Students will gain both a theoretical understanding of and empirical grounding in the politics of urban America. An array of important political, social and economic problems that impact urban politics will be examined.

POL-SCI 425 Seminar in Comparative Politics Credits: 3

A survey of the major research in comparative politics including state building, democracy, economic development, and political violence.

Prerequisites: POL-SCI 220.

Cross Listings: POL-SCI 5513.

POL-SCI 427 Presidential Power: foundations, Growth, Issues Credits: 3

An intense examination of the growth of presidential power, from its constitutional foundations; the necessity of a strong presidency, but the potential for abuse. Appropriate for the general student, as well as for majors in political science.

POL-SCI 435 Politics Of The Environment Credits: 3

A survey of the political aspects of environmental issues. The course poses the problems of environmental damage and examines actual and proposed policies aimed at addressing them. Also offered through the PACE program.

POL-SCI 440 Contemporary Political Thought Credits: 3

Political philosophy from Nietzsche to today.

POL-SCI 442 American Political Thought Credits: 3

This course will focus on intellectual reations to the major periods in American history (the movement for independence, the writing of the Constitution, the Jacksonian period, the Civil War debate, the growth of big business, the rise of the positive state and contemporary America). Contemporary theorists will be included along with Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton, Marshall, etc.

POL-SCI 451 International Politics In Europe Credits: 3

An examination of developments in international politics in Europe since the end of the Cold War. Issues are discussed in the context of relevant theories of international relations.

Restrictions: May not be taken by those who took "Europe After the Cold War

POL-SCI 452 Concepts in International Relations Credits: 3

This course exposes advanced undergraduate students to major conceptual and theoretical approaches to international relations.

Prerequisites: Prior course in international relations, politics, economics, or history.

POL-SCI 480 Government And Politics Credits: 1-6

This variable credit course will explore different contemporary issues and problems related to government and politics. Credit may apply to the major but will not satisfy any of the four subfields distribution requirements.

POL-SCI 490 Senior Seminar Credits: 3

A review, analysis and integration of the literatures of the several sub-fields of the discipline. For senior political science majors only.

Prerequisites: Senior standing.

POL-SCI 491 Internship Credits: 1-6

With the written consent of the department chairman, students may participate in structured internship programs approved by the department for a maximum of six hours.

POL-SCI 492WI Senior Seminar (Capstone) Credits: 3

This intensive survey of political science provides graduating seniors an opportunity for integration and review of their study of political values, behavior, and institutions. Satisfies both writing intensive and capstone requirements.

Prerequisites: Senior standing in political science, RooWriter.

POL-SCI 493 Study Abroad Credits: 1-6

With prior approval from the department advisor, students may complete coursework at an approved foreign university and receive up to 6 hours of political science credit.

POL-SCI 497 Political Science Tutorial Credits: 3

Senior political science majors may apply to do independent study under a selected professor. Must have written consent of the professor prior to registration. Only one tutorial will count toward the major.

POL-SCI 498 Honors Tutorial Credits: 1-3

Senior political science majors with a grade point average of 3.4 or above in political science may apply to do independent study under a selected professor. Must have written consent of professor prior to registration. Only one tutorial will count toward the major.

POL-SCI 5501 Seminar in American Government Credits: 3

A seminar involving intense examination of the foundations, development, and structure of American national government through study of a broad range of classic materials and current research findings; course will prepare a political science graduate student to teach an introductory college course in American government.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

POL-SCI 5505 Scope And Methods Of Political Science Credits: 3

This seminar surveys the various descriptive and quantitative approaches to the study of politics, government and public policy. It covers the methods used in various sub-disciplines and the models employed in political analysis.

POL-SCI 5506 Research Design and Analysis Credits: 3

This course focuses on methods of data gathering, management, and analysis used in political science research. Students gain an understanding of different types of data including surveys, experiments, and archival records. The curriculum will also include ways that these data are managed and analyzed, and how the results are presented in a useful manner.

POL-SCI 5513 Seminar in Comparative Politics Credits: 3

A survey of the major research in comparative politics including state building, democracy, economic development, and political violence.

Cross Listings: POL-SCI 425.

POL-SCI 5521 Judicial Politics Credits: 3

This course addresses broad trends of current research in the area of the judicial process based on empirical studies and the various methodological tools currently used by researchers. Case studies may be used to illustrate in depth the institutional aspects of the judicial process. Biographies may also be used to emphasize the personal and environmental factors which affect judicial decision making.

POL-SCI 5522 Seminar In The Presidency Credits: 3

Critical examination of the American presidency, with in-depth research into selected themes and presidents.

Prerequisites: POL-SCI 406.

POL-SCI 5524 Urban Politics Credits: 3

A seminar on politics and government in urban areas with special attention to community leadership, power structures, interest group and party activity, political behavior, and movements toward local government reform.

POL-SCI 5530 Seminar in International Relations Credits: 3

This course examines major schools of thought and contemporary research in international relations. Topics discussed include international systems, the causes of war and peace, collective security, and international political economy.

POL-SCI 5541 American Political Thought Credits: 3

This course will focus on intellectual reactions to the major periods in American history (the movement for independence, the writing of the constitution, the Jacksonian period, the civil war debate, the growth of big business, the rise of the positive state and contemporary America). Contemporary theorists will be included along with Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton and Marshall.

POL-SCI 5542 Constitutional Interpretation Credits: 3

This course will provide an in-depth treatment of selected areas of constitutional development, related to various aspects of public policy developed under the Constitution through judicial interpretation, including federalism, equality, fundamental rights and freedom of expression.

POL-SCI 5570 The Politics Of Social Security Credits: 3

This course will concentrate upon the principles of social insurance in general, and of the American Social Security system in particular. It will consider the system in relation to the history and traditions of American society. It will analyze popular misconceptions and will pay special attention to the political, economic, and demographic issues relevant to Social Security's current operation and to the program's future.

POL-SCI 5575 Political Ideologies Credits: 3

Consideration of political ideologies and their effects, with in-depth research into selected topics.

POL-SCI 5580 Government And Politics Seminar Credits: 3

Offered as a special seminar in the individual faculty member's area of research specialization. The seminar may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. The topic and instructor will be announced in advance.

POL-SCI 5590 Directed Studies And Research Credits: 1-6

Under the direction of the instructor, students in this course will produce a major research paper: a self-contained thesis chapter, an article for publication or the equivalent. May be repeated for credit.

POL-SCI 5599 Thesis Credits: 1-6

Directed specialized research.

POL-SCI 5688 Doctoral Research Seminar Credits: 3

Students will produce a major research paper under the direction of the instructor. The research project will consist of a self-contained chapter of the dissertation or a work of publishable quality. May be repeated for credit.

POL-SCI 5697 Doctoral-Level Independent Readings Credits: 3

Individual readings under the supervision of members of the Political Science Graduate or Doctoral Faculty in the specified topic or topics. May be repeated. May not be taken during an academic year in which a graduate course or seminar is offered on the topic.

POL-SCI 5697A Doctoral-Level Ir: American National Politics And Institutions Credits: 3

POL-SCI 5697I Doctoral-Level Ir: International Politics And Processes Credits: 3

POL-SCI 5697L Doctoral-Level Ir: Public Law Credits: 3

POL-SCI 5697O Doctoral-Level Ir: Public Opinion And Voter Behavior Credits: 3

POL-SCI 5697R Doctoral-Level Ir: Research Methods Credits: 3

POL-SCI 5697T Doctoral-Level Ir: Political Theory Credits: 3

POL-SCI 5697U Doctoral-Level Ir: Urban And State Politics Credits: 3

POL-SCI 5699 Research And Dissertation Credits: 1-12

Directed specialized research.

POL-SCI 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Psychology Courses

PSYCH 151 College Study Skills and Resources Credits: 3

Course helps Propel students develop critical thinking, time management and academic skills, necessary for success in college and future employment. Students will learn about their individual learning styles and skills as well as the academic resources available to help them develop new skills. They will also explore and use various software and apps to help them stay organized and build self-sufficiency.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 152 Developing a Person-Centered Life Plan Credits: 3

In this course students in the Propel Program will develop a person-centered plan that will serve as a foundation for their college experience and their future. The course approaches the topic with the belief that people with disabilities are people first and therefore the person-centered life engages the whole person and ensures person-centered supports.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 153 Communication Skills for Networking, Employment, and Friendship Credits: 3

Through this course, students in the Propel program will gain communication skills, networking skills; learn how to build friendships; and gain important insight on personal safety.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 154 Personal Finance and Disability Services Credits: 3

This course will introduce Propel students to disability services and systems that they will need in their adult lives. A second focus on personal finance will help students understand how disability benefits affect their personal finances.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 155 Developing a Career Credits: 3

Career development is a journey of self-assessment and decision-making. Using an interactive discovery process, students identify possible careers that would match personality type, strengths, interests, skills, and/or values. With Career Center resources, Propel students identify strategies for leveraging the college experience to jumpstart a career.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 156 Transition Skills Credits: 3

Propel students will learn how to identify, report and avoid abuse, neglect, and exploitation. They will also learn about their personal rights, including the right to confidentiality.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 207 Orientation to the Psychology Major Credit: 1

This course provides an introduction to the field of Psychology, and to the Department of Psychology at UMKC. Students will explore major requirements, behaviors associated with academic success, campus resources, and faculty research and teaching interests.

PSYCH 210 General Psychology Credits: 3

A survey of the fundamental principles, theories, and methods of psychological science.

PSYCH 252 Psychology of Communicating Your Lived Experience Credits: 3

This course provides frameworks for people interested in communicating their lived experiences with disabilities. This course will not satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences' Social and Behavioral Science distribution or Humanities distribution degree requirements.

PSYCH 253 Disability Civil Rights Movements Credits: 3

A survey of disability civil rights movements. The course includes such topics as institutionalization and deinstitutionalization, education, protests, civil rights advocacy, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Students will develop a timeline of disability history milestones and conduct oral history interviews with Kansas City area individuals with disabilities.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 255 Accessible, Inclusive Internships Credits: 3

Through this experiential learning opportunity, students complete an internship with a company, non-profit, governmental or community-based organization. Through a combination of direct observation, reflection, and evaluation, students relate the experience to their academic study and to their career exploration.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 257 Disability History and Culture Credits: 3

An examination of selected political, cultural, economic and social forces shaping disability from historical and present day perspectives. The course is taught with discussions and reflections with local disability leaders.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 258 Leadership and Disabilities Credits: 3

Students learn about leadership theories and develop leadership skills as they apply theory to practical situations.

Prerequisites: Propel Student.

PSYCH 270P Compulsive Gambling And Other Addictions Credits: 3

Course will focus on compulsive gambling and the psychology of addiction. Alcohol, drug, food and sex addiction will also be explored. After attending this course, the student will be able to understand the problem gambling continuum, the phases of the problem gambler and how this addiction affects the family.

PSYCH 302 Experimental Psychology Credits: 4

The rationale and methodology of experimentation in psychology, emphasizing interpretation of data and the design of experiments.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 302WI Experimental Psychology Credits: 4

The rationale and methodology of experimentation in psychology, emphasizing interpretation of data, the design of experiments, and writing. Lecture laboratory each week.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better; RooWriter.

PSYCH 304 Learning Credits: 3

Survey course of the fundamental principles of contemporary theories of learning.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 305 Psychology Of Women Credits: 3

A critical examination of studies of the psychology and behavior of women.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210.

PSYCH 307 Academic and Career Opportunities in Psychology Credits: 2

This course explores post-BA career options for students majoring in Psychology. Students will examine psychology-related career opportunities with a bachelor’s degree, and options for psychology-related careers after earning a graduate degree. Emphasis will be placed on students developing academic plans that will prepare them for professional success.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 207, and PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 308 Sensation and Perception Credits: 3

The study of how we perceive the world through our senses, including the anatomy and function of the sense organs and the effect of normal and altered sensory experience on behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 311 Applied Psychology Credits: 3

The major applications of scientific psychology to human problems and behavior, such as business, mental health, and education are covered. May not be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210.

PSYCH 312 Social Psychology Credits: 3

Survey of behavior in the actual, imagined, and implied presence of others, including attitudes, the self, conformity, altruism, aggression, prejudice, and group processes. May not be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 316 Quantitative Methods In Psychology Credits: 3

Introduction to the use, calculation, reporting, and interpretation of descriptive and elementary inferential statistical techniques in psychological science. Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better; and any MATH (110 or higher).

PSYCH 320 Ethnic and Minority Perspectives in Psychology Credits: 3

The theory, methods and content of psychology relevant to the interests and needs of ethnic minorities, and the contributions of ethnic groups and other minorities to psychology.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 322 Child Psychology Credits: 3

Survey of child development from conception to adolescence, including major theories, developmental milestones and research related to the physical, cognitive, social and emotional growth of children. May not be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 323 Theory and Methods of Personality Credits: 3

The development, organization, dynamics and determinants of personality. May not be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 328 Psychology Of Human Sexual Behavior Credits: 3

The psychological, biological and social factors that contribute to human sexuality, and a review of human sexual development across the lifespan.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210.

PSYCH 331 Introduction to Health Psychology Credits: 3

A survey of the role of psychological factors in physical health and well-being including in health promotion, disease prevention, and adjustment to illness.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 405 Motivation and Emotion Credits: 3

A review of the principles of both human and animal motivation from classical drive, behavioral, and cognitive perspectives. May not be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 406P Introduction To Developmental Disabilities Credits: 4

Principles of human development, causes of disability, and the effects of disability on individuals and families over the life span.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210.

PSYCH 407 Cognitive Psychology Credits: 3

Historical foundations and current state of knowledge regarding human information processing and the mental processes that underlie human behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 407P Developmental Disabilities And Community Life Credits: 4

Focus is on developmental disabilities in community life and interdisciplinary process as a means of coordinating services and supports in community settings. Students will learn about specific disciplines and professions and how they must work together in the community. Topics include the State developmental disabilities network and service system, the principles of person-centered planning, the effects of severe disability on families, and the dynamics surrounding community inclusion of persons with severe disabilities.

PSYCH 415 History And Systems Of Psychology Credits: 3

The historical development of the field of psychology, including a review of its major theoretical schools and methodological advances.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 302WI and PSYCH 316 (C- or better).

PSYCH 418 Brain and Behavior I Credits: 3

Introduction to the neural bases of human behavior, including movement, learning and memory, sensation and perception, emotion, cognition, psychological, and neurological disorders.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 419 Biopsychology II Credits: 3

Advanced study of the neural bases of behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 418.

PSYCH 433 Abnormal Psychology Credits: 3

Introduction to major psychological problems and disorders as well as consideration of some of the many interacting biopsychosocial influences viewed from an empirically-informed perspective. May not be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 440 The Psychology Of Aging Credits: 3

Survey of concepts, theory, and methods in the psychology of aging, including biological and social influences on behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210.

PSYCH 441 Adult Development and Aging Credits: 3

Major developmental theories of adult development and aging are reviewed, including the impact of cohort, gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and culture on development.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 450 Special Topics Credits: 1-3

Offered as the result of student demand, specialized faculty interests, or the availability of a visiting expert in a field related to psychology.

PSYCH 453P Family Life Cycle: Dev Approach Understanding Family Dynamic Credits: 4

The primary purpose of this course is to enhance the student's understanding of the dynamics of healthy families. After receiving a historical overview of the development of families and the cultural roots and traditions behind family structures, child-rearing values and other factors, the student will be given a framework to understand how healthy families establish a dynamic balance between individual and group needs, and between needs to establish structure and to be flexible in the face of change. A second framework will also be presented to provide students with an understanding of how families use their internal resources to cope with life stressors. Given these basic cultural, interactional, and coping frameworks as foundation for understanding, students will explore how families change as they move through time from formation as a couple through early child-rearing, adolescence, mid-life, and post retirement. Implication for human service professionals will be presented.

PSYCH 461 Field Practicum Credits: 1-6

Provides supervised human services experience in an external community agency or organization that addresses human or social problems.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 461A Field Practicum Credits: 4

Provides supervised experience working in community agencies/ organizations which address various human and social problems. A minimum of ten hours per week at practicum site and class attendance are required.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 302WI; at least 15 credit hours of psychology.

PSYCH 490 Directed Individual Research Credits: 1-6

Students work on an individual research project under the supervision of a departmental faculty member.

PSYCH 491 Psychology Research Externship Credits: 1-6

Provides supervised research experience in an external community agency or organization that examines basic or applied research questions.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better.

PSYCH 495WI Contemporary Issues in Psychology Credits: 3

In-depth analysis of a contemporary issue in psychology. Emphasis will be placed on reading and writing about empirical approaches to contemporary challenges in psychological science.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 210 with a C- or better; Roo Writer.

PSYCH 5504 Contemporary Issues In Learning Credits: 3

A discussion and analysis of recent research and theoretical papers in learning. The student will have to demonstrate undergraduate competence in learning in the first few weeks of this course in order to remain enrolled.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 304 (or equivalent).

PSYCH 5505 Motivation Credits: 3

The definition of the concept of motivation is explored. Emphasis is placed upon integration of the concept of motivation into comprehensive theoretical explanations of phenomena. Students should have in their background a foundation in Learning Theory (or at least Theory Construction) and Experimental (Scientific Method). Previous laboratory experiences are desired.

PSYCH 5507 Cognitive Psychology Credits: 3

An overview of the cognitive approach to the study of human behavior. Recent research and theoretical issues in the areas of perception, memory, and concept formation are emphasized.

PSYCH 5509 Assessment 1: Intellectual And Cognitive Assessment Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide students with a foundation in the use of intellectual and cognitive assessment instruments in clinical evaluation. The course covers theoretical issues pertinent to intellectual and cognitive assessment, as well as basic assessment skills including administration, scoring, interpretation, and communication of results for commonly used measures.

PSYCH 5510 Assessment Methods In Professional Counseling Credits: 3

This course provides an understanding of assessment process and assessment techniques. Skills and practice in selection, administration, and interpretation of representative assessment instruments. Two semester hours lecture, two semester hours lab experience per week.

Prerequisites: Course on assessment of intellectual functioning.

Cross Listings: CPCE 5515.

PSYCH 5511 Principles Of Assessment In Psychology Credits: 3

This will be a field practicum course in which test batteries will be used to assess and evaluate the intelligence, personality, and aptitude of the individual.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 5510.

PSYCH 5512 Contemporary Issues In Social Psychology Credits: 3

A critical survey of the recent literature in social psychology with emphasis on experimental investigations.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 312.

PSYCH 5515 Advanced Systems And History Of Psychology Credits: 3

In depth review of the major theoretical systems of psychology in terms of historical assumptions, methodologies and developments with the goal of enabling the student to better evaluate current theories and assumptions in psychology.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 415 (or equivalent).

PSYCH 5516 Quant Analysis 1: Regression And Analysis Of Variance Credits: 3

This graduate level statistics course for students in education and the behavioral sciences provides a strong conceptual understanding of two major statistical procedures with the context of the general linear model: multiple regression and numerous analysis of variance (ANOVA) models. Students will learn to select appropriate statistical techniques, tests the assumptions of the techniques, analyze data using statistical software, and report the results of their analyses in the format of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2002).

Prerequisites: EDUC-R&P 5505, PSYCH 316.

Cross Listings: EDUC-R&P 5605.

PSYCH 5517 Quantitative Analysis II: Advanced Topics In Regression And Mda Credits: 3

This graduate level statistics course for students in the behavioral sciences and education provides a strong conceptual understanding of advanced topics in regression (interaction effects, logistic regression, path analysis) and various multivariate techniques (MANOVA, canonical correlation, factor analysis). Students will complete a series of data based projects that allow them to demonstrate their skills in analysis, reporting and interpretation of findings.

Prerequisites: EDUC-R&P 5605 / PSYCH 5516 and EDUC-R&P 5505.

Cross Listings: EDUC-R&P 5606.

PSYCH 5518 Advanced Biopsychology Credits: 3

This course assumes that the student has mastered the basics of biopsychology, and deals with this topic in greater depth and scope than PSYCH 418. It will begin with a brief review and update of basic materials of neuroanatomy, neuronal conduction, and synaptic transmission but will quickly turn to an emphasis on biological influences on human psychology, in particular those biological factors that are of practical significance in the lives of patient and non-patient populations.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 418 (or equivalent).

PSYCH 5521 Advanced Social Psychology Credits: 3

The study of the individual in a social context. How social structure and interaction influence the behavior of an individual. Several contemporary systematic positions will be compared.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 312.

PSYCH 5522 Contemporary Issues In Developmental Psychology Credits: 3

A discussion of recent research literature in developmental psychology leading to an individual research project in this area.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 322.

PSYCH 5523 Seminar Personality Theory And Methodology Credits: 3

A study of the social-cultural, trait, learning, perceptual, motivational, and field theories of personality with special emphasis on research studies and the methodology of personality research.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 323.

PSYCH 5530 Addressing Health Disparities through Community-based Participatory Research Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the principles of community-based participatory research as a strategy to reduce health disparities. Students will learn how CBPR principles are applied across the research continuum for developing new community partnerships, conducting needs assessments, developing culturally-appropriate health promotion interventions in collaboration with community-based organizations, and packaging health interventions for dissemination in minority communities. This class is organized with a service learning component which will require students to work with a local community-based organization on a health issue for which there is joint interest.

PSYCH 5533 Psychopathology Credits: 3

A review of the experimental-clinical literature concerning the behavior disorders with special reference to their classification and etiology. Course generally will be restricted to students enrolled in license-eligible specialties who have had an undergraduate course in abnormal psychology.

PSYCH 5538 Development And Evaluation Of Assessment Tools Credits: 3

This survey course examines test theories, construction, and measurement theories. Within the context of a variety of conceptual frameworks and examples, students become knowledgeable about the various purposes, approaches, and computer software tools for measurement.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 5516 and PSYCH 5517.

PSYCH 5540 The Psychology Of Aging Credits: 3

This course will identify major issues concerning psychology related to aging. The major influences on the behavior, cognitive functioning and emotions of older adults will be examined. Consideration will be given to individual, group and environmental influences. Possible interventions will be identified. Cross-sectional and longitudinal research will be reviewed in order to examine the changes in individuals due to aging and the differences between cohort groups. Three major areas of information will be the focus: concepts, theory and methods in psychology of aging; biological and social influences on behavior; and behavioral processes. There will be a review of current literature.

PSYCH 5543 Adult Development And Aging Credits: 3

This course will identify major themes and issues of mid-life and older adults. It will examine major developmental theories of adult development and aging. A contextual approach is stressed, including research and theory on the impact of cohort, gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and culture on development. Application to real life is integrated throughout the course. There will be a review of current literature.

PSYCH 5550 Field Practicum Credits: 4

Provides supervised experience working in community agencies/ organizations which address various human and social problems. Students receive training in community service oriented skills and approaches, e.g., advocacy, community organizing, program assessment, development and evaluation, outreach, and applied research. Ten hours per week at practicum site and class attendance are required.

PSYCH 5575 Professional Issues And Ethics In Psychology Credits: 3

Ethical and legal problems of research and practice will be discussed. Professional organizations in psychology and their publications will be reviewed.

PSYCH 5575A Professional Issues & Ethics Credits: 3

PSYCH 5580 Special Topics Credits: 1-3

PSYCH 5580AD Special Topics Credits: 1-3

PSYCH 5580SM Special Topics Credits: 1-3

PSYCH 5582 Community Mental Health Credits: 3

A review of current theory and research. The emphasis is on prevention rather than treatment of mental health problems. The assets and liabilities of neighborhood communities for mental health problems will be discussed. Recent methods in crisis intervention are reviewed. Each student will be required to become familiar with a neighborhood with a high incidence of application for mental health care.

PSYCH 5586 Theory, Research And Practice Of Consultation Credits: 3

Theory and research on community, mental health, organizational and agency consultation. Entry, process, outcome and ethical issues surrounding each model of intervention will be explored. Each student will be expected to conduct and report on a consultation project.

PSYCH 5590 Directed Research Credits: 1-6

PSYCH 5597 Directed Readings In Psychology Credits: 3

Intensive readings in areas of joint interest to the enrolled student and the cooperating faculty.

PSYCH 5599 Research And Thesis Credits: 1-9

PSYCH 5601 Experimental Methods In Design And Analysis I Credits: 3

An examination of multifactor and multilevel designs and interactions. Topics covered will include randomized block designs. Latin square designs, complex trend analysis designs, covariance designs and multiple comparison of treatment means.

PSYCH 5604 Field Practicum In Community Psychology Credits: 3

Supervised experience in health care, social welfare, correctional, political, ethnic, and neighborhood agencies. May be repeated six times for up to 18 credit hours.

PSYCH 5611 Theories & Methods Of Assessment & Intervention/Community Psych Credits: 3

Review of the assessment and intervention literature in social situations will be conducted. Students will design and carry out an assessment and an intervention project.

PSYCH 5612 Program Evaluation And Research Dissemination Credits: 3

A study of the area of applied research in which process and outcome characteristics of programs are related explicitly to a set of values, such as program goals, objectives and costs.

PSYCH 5614 Prevention Science I: Theories, Principles And Methods Credits: 3

Course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of prevention emphasizing basic concepts, conceptual models, and approaches associated with prevention in the field of psychology. The goal is to provide knowledge that will allow students to critically evaluate prevention programs in their communities. Students apply their learning by conducting a critical analysis of an existing community prevention and/or health promotion initiative.

PSYCH 5615 Prevention Science II: Applications Credits: 3

This advanced seminar is the follow-up course to Prevention Science I. Emphasis is placed on the application of prevention science to specific content areas (e. g., substance abuse, violence in schools physical or sexual abuse, AIDS/HIV infection, infant mortality, cardiovascular disease, promoting social competence.) A semester project involves an in-depth review of prevention efforts in the chosen area of interest, resulting in a comprehensive research proposal and/or public policy analysis.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 5614.

PSYCH 5622 Theoretical And Ethical Issues In Professional Psychology Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce first year doctoral students to the fundamental concepts and methods of psychology conceived as the application of scientific and ethical reasoning to human problems. It will provide an in-depth examination of the American Psychological Association code of ethics and its application to the conduct of psychologists. Critical and analytical thinking will be emphasized in all aspects of the course. The course will cover broad models of clinical and counseling psychology and their historical and scientific foundations, issues in diagnosis, cross-cultural applications and professional problems in light of ethical principles, professional standards, scientific data & multicultural contexts.

PSYCH 5623 Methods Of Counseling In Professional Psychology Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and methods of counseling in professional psychology. Students will apply ethical and multicultural principles to the helping relationship while learning the basic methods of humanistic, psychodynamic, and cognitive behavioral approaches as they related to the helping process. A main focus of this course is the acquisition of basic helping skills. Students will also become familiar with counseling outcome research and will increase their level of counselor self-awareness.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 5622.

Cross Listings: CPCE 5530.

PSYCH 5625 Health Research Methods: Intro To Epidemiology & Clinical Trials Credits: 3

This course will introduce graduate students in health-related disciplines to research methods utilized in understanding disease and health risk in humans and conducting intervention trials. Students will learn about how edidemiology contributes to: 1) identifying factors that cause diseases; 2) assessing the public health importance of diseases; 3) describing the natural history of diseases; and 4) evaluating procedures for preventing or treating diseases. After completing this course, students should be able to read and summarize epidemiological research papers and answer questions about a study's purpose, design, methods of procedure, results, and major strengths and weaknesses.

Prerequisites: graduate standing; PSYCH 5601, (or equivalent).

PSYCH 5631 Theoretical Foundations Of Health Psychology Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the theoretical foundations of health psychology, including the Biopsychosocial model, individual and systems level theories of behavior change, stress and coping, disease prevention and health promotion, as well as adherence and relapse models. Upon completion of this course students will possess a broad understanding of how cognitive, behavioral, and social factors interact with biological parameters in influencing morbidity and mortality. In addition, students will become familiar with several substantive areas (e.g., chronic pain, HIV/AIDS, cancer, sleep disorders, cardiovascular risk reduction), research methods, and multicultural and ethical issues in health psychology.

PSYCH 5632 Health Psychology Interventions Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to a wide range of psychological assessment and intervention strategies that can be used in health care settings. Individual, group, community and policy interventions will be discussed. This course may be used for credit in the Health Psychology Discipline of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Program.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 5631.

PSYCH 5638 Seminar In Health Care Leadership Credits: 3

This course is designed to offer an educational experience that fosters both the knowledge and skills needed for leaders of healthcare in the future. The instructors will guide students through the process of generating new thinking, creating new knowledge, and enhancing interpersonal and professional effectiveness. Course topics will include what creates health and quality of life, social capital and health, healthcare policy, collaborative problem-solving, and transformational leadership and systems thinking.

PSYCH 5650 Clinical Practicum Credits: 1-6

Advanced supervised assessment and psychotherapy with individuals and groups in applied settings. Preregistration by application to instructor at least 60 days prior to the beginning of the semester. Approval by Psychology Director of Clinical training required.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 5623.

PSYCH 5660 Clinical Health Psychology Internship Credits: 1-6

Planned sequence of training experiences in an organized program designed to prepare students for the practice of professional psychology.

PSYCH 5696 Pre-Dissertation Credits: 1-12

Individualized research experiences to prepare students for the conduct of the dissertation.

PSYCH 5699 Research And Dissertation Credits: 1-16

PSYCH 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

PSYCH H210 General Psychology Credits: 3

A survey of the fundamental principles, theories, and methods of psychological science.

Social Science Courses

SOC-SCI 301P Varieties - People and Society Credits: 4

This course will entail an intensive study of the sociocultural patterns in a selected nation. The discussions will focus on ethnic, racial and religious diversity in various national settings integrated with material in Soc Sci 303P.

Prerequisites: Block XVI or equivalent.

SOC-SCI 302P Power and Authority Credits: 4

This weeknight course is intended to deal with the issues of power and authority as they bear on people at the individual, family, social and political levels. The intent of the course is to discuss the issues of control, power, authority and the limits of obedience.

SOC-SCI 395C Economics Of Energy Credit: 1

See ECON 395C.

SOC-SCI 465P Human Resources In The Service Industry Credits: 4

This course will trace the historical development, and examine current policies and procedures of human resources in service organizations. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the evolving importance of employees in developing systems to meet operational goals. Management and labor perspectives on legal employment issues, compensations issues, and team development strategies will be examined.

SOC-SCI 5610 Philosophy Of Social Science Credits: 3

This course examines the development of the philosophy of science since the end of the 19th century. In this regard, Positivism, Conventionalism, and Realism as the three major conceptions of science will be studied and their significance as philosophical foundations of the social sciences will be assessed. Particular attention will be given to the emerging philosophy of science (i.e., Scientific Realism) which has profoundly challenged the more established Positivism.

SOC-SCI 5621 Consensus Social Theory Credits: 3

This course explicates the connections between mainstream (or orthodox) approaches in the various social sciences, which can be collectively viewed as Capitalist interdisciplinary social theory, Explication entails positivist philosophy of science, classic liberal political philosophy, neo-classical economics, pluralist political science, human ecology and functionalist sociology.

Prerequisites: SOC-SCI 5610.

SOC-SCI 5622 Pragmatism & Evolutionary Social Theory Credits: 3

Drawing on the classical pragmatism of Peirce and Dewey as the philosophical framework for inquiry, and the institutional economics of Veblen, Commons, Mitchell, and Ayres, this course develops Evolutionary Social Theory as a paradigm for interdisciplinary social science.

SOC-SCI 5630 Seminar in Research Methodology Credits: 3

This course assists students with the establishment of a framework for their dissertation research that represents a substantive integration of their coordination discipline with the SSC program. The ultimate goal of the seminar is a defensible dissertation proposal for each student. Includes opportunity for participation by supervisory committee members.

Prerequisites: SOC-SCI 5610, SOC-SCI 5621, and 1 Critical Theory course.

SOC-SCI 5641 History of a Social Science Discipline Econ Credits: 3

The course examines the social and political development of economics that underpins the development of economic theory in the 20th century.

Prerequisites: SOC-SCI 5610.

SOC-SCI 5690 Special Doctoral Reading in Social Science Credits: 1-3

Special Research Topic in Interdisciplinary Social Science at The Doctoral Level

SOC-SCI 5690A Special Topics Credits: 1-3

SOC-SCI 5690B Special Topics Credits: 1-3

SOC-SCI 5690C Special Topics Credits: 1-3

SOC-SCI 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Sociology Courses

SOCIOL 101 Sociology: An Introduction Credits: 3

An introduction to the study of society and the basic concepts of sociology.

SOCIOL 201 Introduction To Social Psychology Credits: 3

Exploration of the relationships between human behavior and social context. The course focuses on how realities are socially constructed and sustained, the role of symbol systems, definitions of the situation, the self as a product of interaction, and the relationship between language, thought and culture.

SOCIOL 203 Social Problems Credits: 3

An examination of major social problems of modern Western society, including issues of racial conflict, war, civil rights, youth movements, the mass media, urban poverty, and crime. The topics will vary from year to year depending upon the instructor.

SOCIOL 211 Social And Psychological Development Through The Life Cycle Credits: 3

A survey of significant psychosocial issues, events and crises throughout the human life span. The life cycle of the family is examined as the primary context within which individual development occurs. Although the primary emphasis will be on normal adjustment and development, attention will also be given to the occurrence of special problems and deviations at each life stage.

SOCIOL 263 Introduction to Statistics in Sociology/Criminal Justice Credits: 3

A first course in the statistical analysis of quantitative data. Course emphasizes descriptive statistics, probability theory, parameter estimation, bivariate hypothesis testing, and computer applications.

Prerequisites: MATH 110, MATH 116 or an equivalent.

Cross Listings: CJC 210.

SOCIOL 300 Special Topics in Sociology Credits: 1-3

Each time this course is offered, a different area of sociology, to be announced, will be given. On demand.

SOCIOL 300A Special Topics In Sociology Credits: 1-3

Each time this course is offered, a different area of sociology, to be announced, will be given.

SOCIOL 302 Social Stratification Credits: 3

The distribution of power, privileges and prestige are examined in a historical and comparative perspective. The process whereby distribution systems develop, become institutionalized, and become transformed are analyzed.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 302.

SOCIOL 306 Culture, Emotion, and Identity Credits: 3

This course introduces students to some of the key theoretical perspectives and debates within the field of psychological anthropology. By drawing upon cross-cultural studies of emotion, personhood, sexuality, illness, and consciousness it seeks to understand some of the ways that culture and society influence human psychology and experience.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 306.

SOCIOL 308 The Social Life of Things Credits: 3

This course examines the connections between people and things. It explores how social relationships are created and changed through the use and exchange of objects, and how objects themselves take on particular meanings and values in these processes.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 308.

SOCIOL 310R Families And The Life Course Credits: 3

This course is an upper level introduction examining the sociological, historical, and social psychological research on the family, focusing primarily on the United States. The course examines families of varied ethnicity, as well as family compositions at different stages of the life course. Emphasis is placed on the interdependence of family members, as well as how society and policy influence the family.

SOCIOL 313R Sociology Of Gender Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender in contemporary U.S. society. Special attention is directed to how gender is experienced inter-sectionally with other social categories, including social class, race, sexuality, and age.

SOCIOL 316 Sociology Of Death And Dying Credits: 3

Examination of attitudes, behaviors and institutions related to death and dying in contemporary American society. Topics include the status of death in American society, effects of the setting on dying, interaction with the dying, funeral practices, bereavement customs, surviving spouse, and suicide.

SOCIOL 317 Policies Of Drug Use And Control Credits: 3

Utilizing both historical and contemporary information, this course provided an assessment of the "drug problem" in the U.S. and policies of control developed in response to the problem. Drug use criminalization, legalization, medical treatment and prevention strategies and related issues are considered in regard to scientific knowledge related to the patterns, causes and impact of substance abuse.

SOCIOL 318 Sociology Of The Aging Woman Credits: 3

An exploration of the intersection of gender and aging issues with special attention to cultural images of women, the development of self-concept and identity in mid-life and beyond, caring roles in the family, work and retirement, and health and mental health issues. These issues are examined within the context of social class, race, and ethnicity. Implications for community programs and social policy are considered.

SOCIOL 319 Theoretical Criminology Credits: 3

A comprehensive examination of the major criminological theories, their philosophical assumptions, and the sociohistorical context in which they were articulated.

SOCIOL 320 Social Deviance Credits: 3

The dominant sociological perspectives on deviance will be discussed with special attention given to the processes that define behavior and persons as deviant and the impact of such definitions on social relationships and identity.

SOCIOL 322 Race And Ethnic Relations Credits: 3

The nature, origin and dynamics of ethnic and race relations in the U. S. and other societies. Specific attention will be given to the historical and contemporary contexts of prejudice discrimination and confrontation.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 322.

SOCIOL 324 Diversity And You Credits: 3

This course will examine diversity from the perspectives of race, ethnicity, class and gender. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of racism, classism and sexism on interpersonal relationships and strategies to encourage diversity in schools, neighborhoods, and the work place. Students may also enroll in "directed research" in conjunction with his course.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 324.

SOCIOL 326 Consumer Society Credits: 3

This course explores the emergence of Consumer Society as both a sociohistorical development and as an object of social scientific inquiry. Students will explore how the study of Consumer Society has been animated by different scholarly questions, debates, and analytic approaches.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 326.

SOCIOL 327 US Government's Indian Policies: Practices Of A Colonizing Nation Credit: 1

This class will convey information about the implementation of US government policies toward American Indians and how each of the policies, from treaty making, establishing reservations, removing, confronting tribes militarily, and abolishing reservations through allotment resulted in consequences detrimental to tribal welfare. The colonization process created ramifications and consequences that Indian people contend with to this day. This class will provide a historical overview of the consequences associated with political, social, and economic processes that divested Indian people of control over their lives and land they originally lived on.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 327.

SOCIOL 328 Body and Society Credits: 3

Body and Society is an interdisciplinary and comparative approach to the study of the body as the subject and object of social processes. Interdisciplinary approaches to topics such as meaning, ritual, performance, and practice will provide a framework for classical as well as contemporary explorations of bodily representation and experiences across a variety of cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: ANTHRO 103.

SOCIOL 329 The Imagery Of The American Indian In Film Credit: 1

This course will trace the imagery of the American Indian used by film makers through the years and how this has played a role in reinforcing certain inaccurate perceptions of American Indian cultural, social, and economic life. The course examines the sociological implications created by persistently showing misrepresented images of American Indians. The goal is to measure and compare the reality of American Indian life (values , Traditions, and beliefs) with the images created by film makers from the early years of the 20th century to the present.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 329.

SOCIOL 332 Sociology Of Political Life Credits: 3

The concept of power, community power structure and decision making. The social basis of liberal democracy; consensus and legitimacy; political stability and instability. Power and politics in a mass society; elites and masses; democracy and oligarchy; alienation; bureaucracy; pluralism and totalitarianism. Ideology and social movements.

SOCIOL 335R Introduction To Social Work: Principles And Practice Credits: 3

An introductory course to social work, its history and current role in the delivery of social welfare services. Designed to give the student insight into the body of knowledge, theory, values, principles, and techniques of the social work process. Investigation into the varieties of practice methods, i.e., casework, group work, community organization, and the present trend toward the generic approach.

SOCIOL 336 Society And Community Service Credits: 3

This course explores the history and increasing importance of the non-profit sector and volunteerism. Applying theoretical approaches from development and community organizing, the course analyzes the uses of volunteerism and NGOs nationally and internationally. Students' understanding will be enhanced through the inclusion of applied methods needed to manage a non-profit organization and by serving in an internship in a local non-profit during the semester.

SOCIOL 337 Community Development In Urban America Credits: 3

The focus in this course is on experiential learning in which the student participates in several urban community development projects that allow for learning about collaboratives, networking, problem-solving, and requisite skills to successfully manage a project. Principles of community development are presented to give the student background for understanding the projects visited.

SOCIOL 338 The World of Latino Youth and Adolescents in the U.S. Credits: 3

This course will provide a general introduction and in-depth understanding to the largest group of racial/ethnic adolescents in the United States: Latino youth. An historical examination of Latino youth will provide a better understanding of their present status, with emphasis on their contact and interactions within social institutions. Additionally, students will analyze the experiences Latino youth have within and among other groups in the broader social context based on past, present, and possible future interactions.

Cross Listings: LLS 310.

SOCIOL 339 American Indian Leaders: Past And Present Credit: 1

This course will examine the definition of leadership as it relates to American Indian issues. Consideration will be given to the nuances of leadership by examining the social, cultural economic, and political situations that gave cause for particular individuals to assume roles of Indian ranks with those practiced by non-indian leaders. It will trace the evolving nature of leadership within tribal nations and American Indian communitites from past to present, as well as looking at Indian leadership roles in time of war and peace. Lives of the major characters of American Indian historical record will be reviewed, such as Geronimo, Crazy horse, Sitting Bull, Osceola, Tecumseh, Pontic, Black Hawk, Quannah Parker, and Captain Jack.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 339.

SOCIOL 340R Social Change Credits: 3

Examines the key dimensions that bring about change in societies, including revolutions and evolutionary processes. Attention is given to the global context of social change, as well as the role of social actors and social movements.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 340R or SOCIOL 340R.

SOCIOL 347 The American Indian Image: Stereotype Vs. Reality Credit: 1

This class will take a historical, sociological, and cultural approach to review how society at large views American Indians. The course will trace the origin and continued use of American Indian stereotyped views, and assess the sociological and psychological complications that result when judging Indians solely on stereotyped imagery. The course will review the historical content of American Indian life as portrayed in early plays, films, and newspaper accounts and compare these stereotyped images with the reality of American Indian life by providing a depiction of a series of historical events that will offer a more balanced and accurate consideration for American Indian life past and present.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 347.

SOCIOL 348 Latina/Latino Immigrants & Migrants in the U.S Credits: 3

Course studies culture of societies of U.S. citizens and immigrants of Latin American heritage living in the U.S. The course emphasizes recent anthropological as well as historical, cultural and sociological studies.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 348, LLS 348.

SOCIOL 351 Gender, Work And Social Change Credits: 3

This course examines the role of gendered work and consumption in global social change. Drawing from sociological perspectives on gender and work, this course foregrounds a global comparative analysis of societal development and working contexts, including tourism employment, sex work, domestic work, and agricultural, garment, and informatics production. Academic-service learning constitutes a primary course assignment.

SOCIOL 357 Social Movements Credits: 3

This course focuses on the link between social movements and political change in the modern world. Social movements arise outside official channels and against established political orders. Students will develop an understanding of the relation between social mobilization and institutional change in various countries, especially in the United States.

SOCIOL 358 Culture and Society Credits: 3

This course examines the "culture concept" at the heart of the contending theories of society, which is used to describe a society or way of life, a whole social order, or particular aesthetic styles and objects. The course links these various topics together in a concluding section on culture in the age of the Internet and globalization.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 358.

SOCIOL 361 Social Theory Credits: 3

A survey of the major orientations in social theory, their historical development, and contemporary issues and controversies in social theory.

Prerequisites: 3 hours in social science.

SOCIOL 362 Methods Of Sociological Research Credits: 3

Experimental and observational schemes; survey analysis; interview and questionnaire designs; scaling techniques; sampling.

Prerequisites: 3 hours in Social Science.

SOCIOL 390R Directed Field Experience I Credits: 1-6

The student will work within one or more social agencies or organizations in the city under the joint supervision of a professional within the organization and a member of the Sociology Department. In-class discussion will cover the major problems of social organization.

SOCIOL 391 Directed Field Experience II Credits: 1-6

A continuation of SOCIOL 390R.

SOCIOL 397 Independent Readings In Sociology Credits: 1-3

Intensive readings in an area selected by the student with prior consultation with instructor.

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of sociology.

SOCIOL 398 Independent Research In Sociology Credits: 1-6

Intensive research in an area selected by the student with prior consultation with instructor.

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of sociology.

SOCIOL 404WI The Sociology Capstone: Senior Seminar Credits: 3

A seminar which explores the interrelationships between sociology theory, research methods and statistics. May focus on major contemporary issues building on and integrating knowledge obtained in previous courses.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 101, SOCIOL 263, SOCIOL 361, SOCIOL 362, RooWriter.

SOCIOL 410R Aging In Contemporary Society Credits: 3

Attitudes and stereotypes, the status of the aged in American society; the social psychology of the aging process; the response of societal institutions such as the family and political system to the aging of the population as a whole. Applications and potentials of research are considered.

SOCIOL 411 Sociology Of Human Sexuality Credits: 3

A cross cultural examination of the most fundamental dichotomy in human society: male and female. Considering sex both as a biological and social category, this course compares diversity and similarity in the interrelationships of male and female in patterns of behavior and social organization found in human societies across time and space.

SOCIOL 418 Feminist Theories Credits: 3

This class introduces the major feminist theories and their primary authors over the last 200 years. The class takes both a historical view (beginning with two millenia of male-centered theories about women) and a conceptual approach (theories are grouped by common ground) and familiarizes the student with both the historical processes that necessitate feminist theories as well as with the breadth and depth of the historically and currently available scholarship.

Prerequisites: WGS 201.

SOCIOL 431 Social Organization Of The City Credits: 3

An examination of the social structure of the American city with special reference to the historical development of American cities. Attention will be focused on the role of social institutions as they have changed in relation to urban problems.

SOCIOL 433 Immigration and the City Credits: 3

This course examines key issues and controversies in immigration research. Special attention will be paid to the social, economic, and historical developments of urban immigrant communities.

SOCIOL 434 Spatial Thinking in Social Science Credits: 3

This course will review ways in which social scientists have incorporated the concepts of space, place, and distance into their theories and research. Readings will be drawn from interdisciplinary work in the areas of urban sociology, criminology, health and demography that deal with spatial organization of communities and cities, spatial disparity of health and crimes, and mobility.

Prerequisites: junior, senior, or graduate standing.

SOCIOL 440R Sociology Of Medicine Credits: 3

Relationship of basic concepts in sociology to health and medical care. Cultural and class variations in health status. Social and cultural aspects of health.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 101.

SOCIOL 441 Globalization and Development Credits: 3

Focuses on issues of economic development, social stratification, political institutions, and political mobilization in societies where colonialism provided the context for their long-term disadvantages in the international economic order. Specific attention is paid to the intersection of the international components that define the options and limits for societal development (e.g., market shifts, international institutions and contracts, foreign policies, and migration) and the distinct social, political and cultural implications of these factors for developing societies.

Cross Listings: ANTHRO 441.

SOCIOL 5501 Social Theory I Credits: 3

Examines the development of social theory in Europe up to the beginning of the twentieth century, with a focus on its intellectual precursors of social theory, debates over the nature of society, and controversies over the distinct features of sociology as an emerging academic discipline. The major perspectives covered include the intellectual origins of sociological thought in Great Britain, France, and Germany, and the debates as reflected in the writings of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmel.

Prerequisites: undergraduate course in Sociological Theory.

SOCIOL 5502 Social Theory II Credits: 3

Examines the major sociological theories developed during the twentieth century and contemporary debates over the nature of society and the nature of our knowledge about society. Theories to be examined include behaviorism, symbolic interactionism, structural functionalism, phenomenology, conflict theory, postmodernism, those that attempt to integrate social agency and structure, and feminist theory.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 5501.

SOCIOL 5503 Controversies In Contemporary Social Theory And Practice Credits: 3

This course critically examines central issues in contemporary debates among social theorists over the nature of society and how it should be studied.

SOCIOL 5510 Sociological Methods I Credits: 3

A survey of methods used by sociologists: selection and formulation of problem, research design, survey research, participant observation, sampling, reliability and validity, use of scales, and data analysis.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 362 (or equivalent).

SOCIOL 5511 Sociological Methods II Credits: 3

Quantitative research is the primary focus of the course; emphasis is placed on problem formulation; research design; sampling procedures; questionnaire construction and interviewing techniques; data collection; problems of scaling, validity and reliability; uses of secondary data sets; data analyses and report writing.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 362 (or equivalent).

Cross Listings: CJC 5511.

SOCIOL 5516 Intermediate Statistics Credits: 3

A systematic development of the logic and practice of selected statistical methods used in sociological research. Included are analysis of variance and covariance, regression analysis, multiple contingency, and non-parametric tests.

Prerequisites: SOCIOL 263.

Cross Listings: CJC 5516.

SOCIOL 5530 Anthropology Of Gender Credits: 3

This class explores theories of the social construction of gender in cross-cultural contexts. It will also explore global issues of diversity, local and international politics, the economy and work, education, etc.

SOCIOL 5531 Feminist Theories Credits: 3

This class introduces the major feminist theories and their primary authors over the last 200 years. The class takes both an historical (we begin with two millennia of male-centered theories about women) and a conceptual approach (theories are grouped by common ground) and familiarizes the student with both the historical processes that necessitate feminist theories as well as with the breadth of the historically and currently available scholarship. Graduate students are expected to fulfill all undergraduate requirements at graduate-level quality, including independent research components; in addition, graduate students are required to be prepared to lead class discussions.

Prerequisites: WGS 201.

SOCIOL 5534 Spatial Thinking in Social Science Credits: 3

This course will review ways in which social scientists have incorporated the concepts of space, place, and distance into their theories and research. Readings will be drawn from interdisciplinary work in the areas of urban sociology, criminology, health and demography that deal with spatial organization of communities and cities, spatial disparity of health and crimes, and mobility.Generic computer file management skills are required and knowledge of research methods is desirable.

SOCIOL 5537 Anthropology of Religion Credits: 3

This course explores the ways anthropologists have gone about studying religion from the opening decades of the 20th century to present. The course introduces students to the diversity of human religious expression and experience through anthropological literature and to the diversity of anthropological expression especially as it has been revealed in social scientific studies of religious life. The course is designed to generate a critical dialogue about the special role that religion has played in the ongoing anthropological engagement with "other" societies and cultures over time.

SOCIOL 5538 Gender, Work And Social Change Credits: 3

This course examines the role of gendered work and consumption in global social change. Drawing from sociological perspectives on gender and work, this course foregrounds a global comparative analysis of societal development and working contexts, including tourism employment, sex work, domestic work, and agricultural, garment, and informatics production. Graduate students are required to carry out independent research or complete work in the area of public sociology and academic-service learning. Students will write a conference paper or journal quality article from this research.

SOCIOL 5540 Urban Social Structure Credits: 3

An examination of the social structure of the American city with special reference to the historical development of American cities. Attention will be focused on the role of social institutions as they have changed in relation to urban problems.

SOCIOL 5550 Sociology Of Aging Credits: 3

A seminar in which theoretical orientations, methodologies, and findings from crosscultural and community research in gerontology are systematically reviewed, within a social change framework.

SOCIOL 5554 Sociology Of The Aging Woman Credits: 3

An exploration of the intersection of gender and aging issues with special attention to cultural images of women, the development of self-concept and identity in mid-life and beyond, caring roles in the family, work and retirement, and health and mental health issues. These issues are examined within the context of social class, race, and ethnicity. Implications for community programs and social policy are considered. Graduate students will be expected to carry out a research project and to lead a class session.

SOCIOL 5556 Aging And Developmental Disabilities Credits: 2

This course explores the experience of aging with a developmental disability or mental retardation within the context or normative aging. Among the comparisons made between older persons with and without developmental disabilities are their demographic characteristics, physical and cognitive functioning, role transitions and losses, identities and self-concepts, and family and caregiving issues. Policies, programs, and emerging concepts of best practices are considered within the context of quality of life, ethical, and community inclusion bases.

SOCIOL 5557 Practicum In Aging And Developmental Disabilities Credit: 1

Students gain experience in working with and defining issues of older persons with developmental disabilities through placements in sheltered workshops, senior centers, residential group homes, and other community-based programs.

Co-requisites: SOCIOL 5556.

SOCIOL 5560 Sociology Of Death And Dying Credits: 3

This course examines attitudes, behaviors, and institutions related to death and dying in contemporary American society. Topics include the meanings of death in American society, social settings for dying, interaction with the dying, customs and practices surrounding death, role transitions of survivors, and suicide. Special attention is given to issues of aging and dying.

SOCIOL 5573 Latin American Immigrants and Refugees in the U.S. Credits: 3

This course is the study of history, culture and societies of immigrants and US citizens of Latin American heritage living in the U.S.

SOCIOL 5580 Special Studies In Sociology Credits: 1-3

An opportunity to explore in depth topics not included in usual course offerings. One or more topics will be announced in advance of registration.

SOCIOL 5595 Directed Research Experience Credits: 3

Research project supervised by faculty.

SOCIOL 5597 Independent Readings Credits: 1-3

Intensive readings in an area selected by the student with prior consultation with the instructor.

SOCIOL 5599 Thesis And Research Credits: 1-6

Directed specialized research. Before writing a thesis, the student must clear the topic and research design with the Supervisory Committee. The course also involves the writing of the thesis.

SOCIOL 5699 Dissertation Research Credits: 1-12

Individual directed research leading to preparation and completion of doctoral dissertation.

SOCIOL 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1