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Courses

ANCH 101 University College Seminar Credits: 3

The purpose of ANCH 101 is to help new students make a successful transition to the University of Missouri-Kansas City, both academically and personally. This course aims to help students develop and apply critical thinking skills (Interdisciplinary and Innovative Thinking and Valuing and Reasoning), engage in the curricular and co-curricular life of the university, articulate to students the expectations of the University and its faculty, understand the value of a liberal education in the 21st century, and continue to clarify their purpose, meaning, and direction. First-time, year-one students admitted into the University College will enroll in ANCH 101.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 102 Introduction to Urban Studies Credits: 3

Introduction to Urban Studies is a lecture and discussion course that provides the undergraduate student with an overview of the interdisciplinary field of urban social science. The student who successfully completes this course will have a broad understanding of the major issues, vocabulary, basic methods, and prominent scholars in urban studies. We will explore current events of relevance, including the opportunities and problems facing major cities in the United States including Kansas City.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 103 Muse Credits: 3

This course merges a variety of academic platforms and student activities so that collaboration among disciplines becomes a natural, logical solution to academic, professional, and performing arts challenges. Course content is derived from music history as it relates to Kansas City in the 21st century through examining the ethics of creating the canon. Activities are drawn directly from music history to achieve understanding in Human Values and Ethical Reasoning as they relate to our community.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 104 The Countercultural Experience Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course examines countercultures, groups whose shared values and practices set them apart from mainstream culture. Students will explore how and why countercultures form, transform and decline; how they reason out, articulate and practice their shared cultural values; their function as distinctive discourse communities; and how individual members negotiate their identities and values within and between cultural groups.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 105 The Value of Beauty Credits: 3

This class surveys European aesthetics, defining what counts as beautiful and the roles art plays in society.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 106 Money, Medicine and Morals Credits: 3

This course will improve the student's understanding of and ability to critically evaluate complex moral dilemmas in medicine, business, law and other professions. Students will learn critical thinking, arguing, writing and presentation skills through examining moral issues for professionals. Guest speakers will introduce students to practical aspects of professional life.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 107 Global Inequality: Slavery in Historical and Archaeological Perspective Credits: 3

Using archaeological and historical evidence from around the world, including the state of Missouri and the Kansas City region, students will explore the conditions which gave rise to inequality. By exploring slavery in various forms, students will understand its historical development, as well as its continued impact on society today.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 108 Surfing the Matrix: Keeping Your Head Above Water in a Sea of Information Credits: 3

Students will analyze, interpret and/or reconstruct human events, experiences, actions and interactions, through case studies that will help them to understand the principles of value and civic duty in a wide range of settings. Students will be able to identify ethical problems in business, apply critical thinking concepts to better synthesize their understanding of ethical issues and moral reasoning, and be able to articulate implications and consequences that emerge from critical thinking constructs when filtering, analyzing and synthesizing multiple variables.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 109 Education and Urban Society Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce students to the social and philosophical issues in urban education and will include an emphasis on culture, race, class, and ethnicity as they relate to schooling in urban America. Students will engage in thinking and rethinking problems, issues and solutions that complicate our collective understanding of the intersection of urban society and education.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 150 Computing and Engineering in Society Credits: 3

This course provides a broad and general introduction to the practice and history of engineering and computing fields; their impact on humanity and society and their relationship to the ecosystem, professionalism and ethics. The course introduces important concepts relevant to the fields of engineering and computing, including the engineering approach to solving problems, communications and computations, ethics, environmental responsibility and teamwork. Particular attention will be paid to how technology, engineering and pervasive computing impacts society. The course also introduces academic skills and strategies for success as a student and in a professional career.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

ANCH 199 Anchor I Special Topics Credits: 3

Anchor I Special Topics

ANCH 201 Race in American Film Credits: 3

This course examines representations of race and ethnicity in American film from the silent era onward in mainstream and countercultural traditions. It explores how social, political, and economic conditions contribute to constructions of race and ethnicity.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 202 Crossing Boundaries Credits: 3

This course examines the Latina/o immigrant experience from the immigrants' diverse origins in the Americas to the communities they shape. Students will examine how empire, war, and economic integration have pushed people to migrate and how work, family, and immigration policy have shaped patterns of migration and settlement as well as integration and exclusion.

Prerequisites: DISC 100 and Anchor I.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 204 Women in the Ancient World Credits: 3

This course focuses on the history, representation, literature, social lives, and political roles of women in ancient civilization including Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Biblical World, Greece, and Rome. It integrates methodologies from history, art history and archaeology, literary studies, and women's studies.

ANCH 205 Self in a Multicultural Society Credits: 3

This course will focus on what it means for the individual to live in a multicultural, urban, and increasingly global society. Students ill examine their own cultural identity, including values and worldviews as well as assumptions and biases regarding others' diversity. In addition, the course will focus on learning about different cultures and issues associated urbanism, globalization, cultural conflicts and social advocacy.

ANCH 206 Queer in the City/An Introduction to LGBT Studies Credits: 3

This course introduces queer theory within the context of gender studies and urban studies. We will read, discuss, and react to classic text in queer theory, lesbian and gay studies, and sexuality and space studies. There will be an emphasis on finding "otherness" within everyday spaces, places, texts, and discourses.

Prerequisites: Anchor I and DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 207 The Classical Mediterranean World Credits: 3

This course examines the history, literature, and culture of Ancient Greece and Rome in the context of the Mediterranean world, from its origin until the Barbarian invasion. Students will read poetry, philosophy, history, rhetoric, and letters from primary text sources and they will study material evidence such as architecture, graffiti, and physical objects as representative survivals of these cultures.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 208 Women in the Medieval World Credits: 3

This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women during the Middle ages (ca. 600-1500), focusing on the different cultures of Europe. Arranged around a series of themes, the cluster will read a variety of documentary and literary texts to investigate the ways in which women experienced agency, were depicted and imagined, and acted within the social and cultural contexts of the era.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 209 World Cultures, Histories and Ideas Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course will explore the cultures, histories, and ideas of one or more regions of the world as well as dynamics of interaction between them. Students will be exposed to a very wide range of disciplinary approaches to this topic and learn how to engage critically in an interdisciplinary dialogue within this field. Topics will vary depending on the instructors.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 210 American Cultures, Histories & Ideas Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course will explore the cultures, histories, and ideas of the United States. Students will be exposed to a very wide range of disciplinary approaches to this topic and learn how to engage critically in an interdisciplinary dialogue within this field. Topics will vary depending on the instructors.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 211 Cities of the World Credits: 3

This course will focus on urban issues to help students develop global perspectives. Urbanization has been a global phenomenon, and more than half of the world population lives in urban areas. Students will learn past, present and future urban issues and challenges on the global scale and about how cities of the world have coped and will cope with these issues and challenges.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 212 Critical Issues in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Credits: 3

This class is an interdisciplinary course that will examine critical issues in women's, gender and sexuality studies by focusing on the intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, and social context. Through their study of these intersections, students will become more sensitive to the impact of social structures on gender and the experiences of women and men.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 213 Empire Credits: 3

This is an interdisciplinary, team-taught course designed to teach students ways to think about the complexities of human cultures, past and present, helping them examine how imperialism continues to shape contemporary understandings of personal, institutional, and cultural identities (both of selves and others). The course analyzes global cultures with a focus on the economic, environmental, political and social consequences of specific imperial regimes and the ongoing impact of these regimes on particular groups that continue to live with the legacies of empire.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 214 European Cultures, Histories & Ideas Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course will explore the cultures, histories, and ideas of a particular region of Europe. Students will be exposed to a wide range of disciplinary approaches to this topic and learn how to engage critically in an interdisciplinary dialogue within this field. Topics will vary depending on the instructors.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 215 Crossing Boundaries: The Latina/o Immigrant Experience Credits: 3

This course examines the Latina/o immigrant experience from the immigrants' diverse origins in the Americas to the communities they shape. Students will examine how empire, war, and economic integration have pushed people to migrate and how work, family, and immigration policy have shaped patterns of migration and settlement as well as integration and exclusion.

Prerequisites: DISC 100 and Anchor I.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 216 Intersections of Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality Credits: 3

This course explores the complex, interconnected dynamics of and between race, (social) class, gender and human sexuality. As an interdisciplinary course, it explores how these concepts are understood holistically and how they are constructed and positioned within US society. This class emphasizes investigations, via critical thinking, about how these different systems of inequality interact with and through each other, while also being sensitive to different theoretical and methodological frameworks from several disciplines employed to analyze those systems.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-Requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH 218 Introduction to Ethnic Studies Credits: 3

An interdisciplinary course that uses a comparative perspective to examine the history, social issues, and cultural productions of African Americans, Arab Americans, Asian Americans, Latina/os, and Native Americans. Students will be introduced to key concepts and methods used in the study of race in an American context.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites:DISC 200.


ANCH 218 - MOTR LITR 105: Multicultural Literature
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

ANCH 220 We Shall (All) Overcome: Civil Rights Movements in Contemporary America Credits: 3

This course examines the fight for civil rights in America in the 20th and 21st centuries in order to emphasize the importance of culture and diversity in American society. Using interdisciplinary methods, the course addresses various local and national movements among the African American, Latino/a, LGBT, and Native American communities, as well as the women's rights movement.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-Requisites: DISC 200 (or satisfy DISC 200 with credit from two of ENGLISH 110, ENGLISH 225, or COMM-ST 110).

ANCH 299 Anchor II Special Topics Credits: 3

Anchor II Special Topics.

Prerequisites: Anchor I and DISC I.

ANCH 301 Environmental Sustainability Credits: 3

This course will introduce the concept of environmental sustainability and review examines how sustainability might work at the individual, neighborhood, state, nation and global scales. Students will participate in some form of community engagement on sustainability as well as reflect upon how their own practices impact the environment.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 302 Archaeology of Ancient Disasters Credits: 3

Remarkable human achievements are revealed by archaeological research, but the human past was frequently shaped as well by disasters of natural and human origin. Drawing on case studies that include data from the geosciences, archaeological excavations, and historical sources, this class examines how earth processes, the biosphere, and human cultural behavior were all sources of catastrophe.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 303 Film Adaptation Credits: 3

The class will explore the process of adapting both fiction and non-fiction literary works into motion pictures. Students will examine the original literary source, then the interim screenplay and finally the completed motion picture. This class will also explore the practical aspects of creating a film adaptation in Kansas City. Students will interact with Kansas City area film professionals and learn about the practical aspects of filming and exhibiting films in Kansas City.

Prerequisites: Anchor II, DISC 200.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 304 Telling Stories: History, Memory, and American Life Credits: 3

How we remember the past is shaped not only by academic historians but also by collectors, curators, librarians, archivists, artists, architects, urban planners and ordinary people. This course will invite students to participate in the shaping of history and memory through civic engagement in their community. Students will use resources available in local institutions to raise critical awareness about historical issues relevant to the present.

Prerequisites: Anchor II, DISC 200.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 305 The Artist in Society Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary anchor III course explores the various roles of artists in society. Using historical examples and building on current best practices, students will engage critically with the interplay between artistic pursuits, social justice, and community engagement.

Prerequisites: Anchor II, DISC 200.

ANCH 306 From Bench to Bedside: Translational Research Credits: 3

This course explores the spectrum between basic biological research and bedside clinical practice, delving into the topics “what is translational research?” and “how does a drug get to the market”. By engaging with people from the community involved at all levels of translational research, students will gain an appreciation for the civic issues behind medical research, the interdisciplinary nature of research, and the part that Kansas City institutions play in regional life and health sciences.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, Anchor II.

Co-Requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 307 Frauds, Myths and Mysteries in Archaeology Credits: 3

Using archaeological hoaxes, myths, and mysteries from around the world – including local and regional examples - students will use science to make good judgments about information they receive in today’s world. This course will demonstrate how science approaches questions about human antiquity and will show where pseudoscience falls short.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 308 Ethical Issues in Computing & Engineering Credits: 3

Societal and ethical obligations of computer science, IT, and electrical/computer engineering practice. Topics include ethical obligations of professional practice, electronic privacy, intellectual property, software and system security and reliability, and whistle-blowing. This course teaches the principles of ethical analysis and how technology, law, and ethics interact in society, to help the graduate confront and deal with the ethical challenges that arise in professional practice.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 309 Mechanical Design Synthesis I Credits: 3

Introduction to and application of the Engineering Design Process including: product development, needs identification, benchmarking, information gathering, intellectual property, concept generation, creativity methods, concept selection, professional, ethical and legal responsibilities, and computer-aided design and rapid prototyping applications. A comprehensive design project requiring community engagement and an interdisciplinary design approach is required for each student. Recommended preparation: MEC-ENGR 130 or MEC-ENGR 131 or comparable non-engineering 3D CAD course.

Prerequisites: Anchor II.

Co-Requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 310 Innovation and the Aging Population Credits: 3

Students in this course will explore the problems, challenges, and opportunities of an aging urban population and the role of the University in that context.

Prerequisites: ANCH I (Reasoning and Values) or equivalent, ANCH II (Culture and Diversity) or equivalent.

Co-requisites: DISC 300 (Civic and Community Engagement).

ANCH 311 Civil Engineering Capstone Design II Credits: 3

Comprehensive and realistic design project for area municipalities. Design choices and their effect upon the environment. Design constraints include constructability, minimization of environmental impact and cost-effectiveness. Managerial and professional aspects of design practice. Demonstrate understanding of engineering ethics. Includes interdisciplinary, community engagement within the context of civil engineering practice. Recommended preparation: CIV-ENGR 411.

Prerequisites: ANCH II.

Co-Requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 314 Interdisciplinary Community Oral Health Field Experiences Credits: 3

Students will practice skills/principles learned in Anchor I-II by participating in interdisciplinary community projects and clinical activities targeting Kansas City's urban and surrounding rural environments. Students will use strategies of assessment, program planning, implementation and evaluation to improve existing, develop new, and reflect on service projects' purposes, methods, and consequences. Major emphases include team collaboration/leadership of civic action, community programming to enact measurable and meaningful change, respectful communication considering health literacy and associated disparities among patients and health care providers, to express ideas supporting wellness through improved oral health.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, Anchor II.

ANCH 315 Application to Practice I Credits: 3

This is the first of two clinical application courses designed to complement didactic content from the four-course block sequence (N481-N484). Students will integrate an increasingly complex knowledge base with an emphasis on developing effectiveness: personally, interpersonally, and in the health management of populations of clients within systems of community and professional organizations and practice settings. Student cohort groups, in collaboration with personnel from health related organizations and faculty, assess population health needs, identify outcomes and develop action plans based on real need. The practice experience learning processes and outcomes will be collective and provide solutions for the health care community.

Prerequisites: NURSE 481.

Co-requisites: NURSE 482 or NURSE 483.

ANCH 317 Science, Technology, and Society Credits: 3

This course examines how practitioners of science and innovators of technology have engaged with society throughout the past and up to the present. The central question that will frame our examination of their activities is, “What is civic engagement?” Through readings and research, we will examine how science and technology have influenced public policy and thus democracy itself. Students will take advantage of the close proximity of the Linda Hall Library to work with professionals at this unique repository of scientific and technological source material.

Prerequisites: ANCHOR I, ANCHOR II.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 318 From Oil Gushers to Fracking: A History of American Petroleum Credits: 3

This course asks students to consider civic engagement by studying how the history of oil production and consumption has influenced people’s relationships to their communities and environments at the local, regional, and global scale. Bringing together the fields of geology and history, this interdisciplinary course explores how carbon fuels shapes life on the planet. Students will use civic engagement as a lens to examine how the use of fossil fuels has impacted societies and to learn how their actions as individuals and community members presently leave carbon footprints.

Prerequisites: ANCHOR I, ANCHOR II.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 319 Immersion in Urban Communities Credits: 3

This course is an experiential course where in much of the learning occurs through the student’s interaction with their community and the student’s thoughtful reflection on those activities. This course provides an in-depth examination into both the evolution of marginalized communities and dynamics of community building in inner cities, with special emphasis on Kansas City, Missouri. Students will be expected to explore their own role as an active citizen of their community through volunteerism and participation at civic events.

Prerequisites: ANCHOR II.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH 320 Visual Culture and Civic Engagement Credits: 3

In this course students explore civic engagement through visual culture as both consumers and producers of information, and through both historical and contemporary examples. Areas of study include political communication and propaganda, public art, infographics and data visualization, performance, signage, monuments and mass media.

Prerequisites: Anchor II.

ANCH 399 Anchor III Special Topics Credits: 3

Anchor III Special Topics

ANCH H199 Anchor I Special Topics Credits: 3

Anchor I Special Topics

ANCH H214 European Cultures, Histories & Ideas Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course will explore the cultures, histories, and ideas of a particular region of Europe. Students will be exposed to a wide range of disciplinary approaches to this topic and learn how to engage critically in an interdisciplinary dialogue within this field. Topics will vary depending on the instructors.

Prerequisites: Anchor I, DISC 100.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH H298 Great Ideas: The Idea of Culture Credits: 3

Course will follow the evolution of ideas of culture from Classical Antiquity to the present, discussing different notions of culture across the world, whether anthropological, political or otherwise. We will begin by considering how culture is opposed to nature, and then move to the idea of comparative cultural anthropology in the Enlightenment, and finish with discussing current ideas of “cultural technologies.” Culture has also been opposed to technology (particularly in old European ideas of high culture), yet it increasingly depends on material mediation, whether through book-printing, the public institutions of newspaper and symphony orchestra, or radio, film and TV.

Co-requisites: DISC 200.

ANCH H299 Anchor II Special Topics Credits: 3

Anchor II Special Topics

ANCH H397 Public Urban Education Credits: 3

Is public urban education a “wicked problem,” an unparalleled opportunity, or a complex challenge that can be met during the twenty-first century in the United States? This interdisciplinary course will interrogate that question by surveying the history of public urban education, by considering contemporary educational issues, and by sending students into public urban schools to make their own observations and recommendations. Students will volunteer at least twelve hours during the semester at designated Kansas City schools.

Co-requisites: DISC H300.

ANCH H398 CITYLAB: ADDRESSING URBAN POLICY AND PUBLIC HEALTH THROUGH COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Credits: 3

This CITYLAB course engages the undergraduate student as an active participant in the life of an Urban-Serving University through the research and community partnerships developed through a collaborative, community-based process. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with community-based participatory research (CBPR), to develop a community-based project, and to experience the ethics of civic and community engagement firsthand. The purpose of the CITYLAB approach is to: a) Identify and tackle a complex urban challenge that impacts people’s everyday lives and b) Look at urban problems in new ways through a university-community partnership.

Prerequisites: Anchor 1 and Anchor 2 or equivalent.

Co-requisites: DISC 300.

ANCH H399 Anchor III Special Topics Credits: 3

Anchor III Special Topics