Bloch School
5110 Cherry Street
(816) 235-2215
bloch@umkc.edu
http://www.bloch.umkc.edu/

Mailing Address
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Henry W. Bloch School of Management
5110 Cherry Street
Kansas City, MO 64110-2499

Dean:
Brian Klaas

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Programs:
David Cornell

Assistant Dean for Student Services:
Kami Thomas

Assistant Dean for Strategy and Planning:
Sheri Gormley

Chair, Department of Accountancy:
David Cornell

Chair, Department of Global Entrepreneurship:
Jeff Hornsby

Chair, Department of Finance:
Fred Hays

Chair, Department of Management:
Sidne Ward

Chair, Department of Marketing & Supply Chain Management:
Kalpesh Desai

Chair, Department of Public Affairs:
David Renz

Director, Executive MBA Program:
Kimberly Young

Director, Lewis White Real Estate Center:
Charles Connely

Director, MBA Programs:
Dustin Cornwell

Coordinator, Doctoral Studies in Public Affairs and Administration:
Arif Ahmed

Coordinator, Doctoral Studies in Entrepreneurship and Innovation:
Brian Anderson

Degree Programs

The Bloch School offers the degrees of bachelor of business administration (B.B.A.), bachelor of science in accounting (B.S.A.), master of business administration (MBA), master of public administration (M.P.A.), master of science in accounting (M.S.A.), master of science in finance (M.S.F.), and master of science in entrepreneurial real estate (M.S.E.R.E.). Within the MBA program there are Executive MBA (EMBA), Full-Time MBA, and Professional MBA offerings.  Within the M.P.A., there is an Executive M.P.A. (E.M.P.A.).  Additionally, the School has two joint degree programs with the UMKC School of Law, the J.D./MBA and the J.D./M.P.A. degrees, participates in the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program and offers a Ph.D. in Entrepreneurship & Innovation. The Bloch School also offers business and entrepreneurship minors. The Department of Public Affairs also has a Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management and Innovation and a Graduate Certificate in Urban Policy Administration.

History

The University has offered business courses since 1933. In 1953, with the support and encouragement of the Kansas City community, the School of Business Administration was established. Since that time, the Bloch School has grown to a student body of 2000 and a faculty of approximately 45 professional educators. In January 1988, the School was renamed for Henry W. Bloch, co-founder of H&R Block, and moved into a newly expanded building. In 2010, the School officially changed its name to the Henry W. Bloch School of Management to reflect our differentiation as a school that integrates business management, public administration and the infusion of a global, innovative and entrepreneurial mindset. In the fall of 2013, a second building was added to the Bloch School, the Bloch Executive Hall for Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

Mission and Vision

The Henry W. Bloch School of Management develops purposeful, entrepreneurial and innovative leaders to meet changing global demands, and advances knowledge and practice through excellent teaching, scholarship, outreach and service.

The Bloch School aspires to be Kansas City's nationally and globally preeminent school of management focusing on entrepreneurship and innovative thinking as the foundation for transforming talent and achieving sustainable growth in for-proft, public, and nonprofit enterprises.

Accreditation

The Bloch School is accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business and by the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Public Administration (NASPAA).

Advising and Student Services

Staff in the Student Services Office, room 115 of Bloch Heritage Hall, assist students in applying for admission, planning programs and registering for courses. Freshmen and junior students must be advised each semester and advising is required for new students and students on probation.  Advising information can be found at http://bloch.umkc.edu/students/student-services/advising.aspx. Faculty of the School's six curricular departments are also available to discuss students' programs. Students in the M.P.A. and M.S.E.R.E. programs are advised by departmental faculty.  MBA students are advised by MBA program staff.

Scholarships

The Bloch School offers numerous scholarships for students enrolled in Bloch degree programs. Information and applications are available on the Bloch School Web site at http://bloch.umkc.edu/students/paying-for-school/bloch-scholarships.aspx. March 1 is the deadline for the majority of these scholarships, which are awarded for the following academic year. For information on loans, grants and other financial aid, contact the UMKC Student Financial Aid and Scholarships Office.

Internships

Students who want to experience work opportunities while in school are encouraged to take their learning beyond the classroom through internships. For-credit internships typically carry one to three hours of credit. To earn academic credit, students should identify a Bloch School faculty member qualified and willing to supervise an internship, complete an internship form available on the Bloch School Web site at http://bloch.umkc.edu/students/student-services/forms.aspx and enroll in an approved internship course. Interested students may contact the UMKC Career Services Office or Bloch Career Network.

International Study Abroad

Bloch School students have the opportunity to study abroad for credit. Students may study for a week, a semester, or an academic year.  Students who are interested in study abroad opportunities should contact the Bloch School Student Services office or the UMKC International Academic Programs office.

Arif Ahmed2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of health administration; B.D.S. (Dhaka Dental College); M.S.P.A., Ph.D. (University of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign).

Latheff N. Ahmed; professor emeritus of public administration; B.A. (University of Mysore); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Kansas).

M. Ishrat N Ali2,3 Contact Information; assistant professor of entrepreneurship and innovation; B.S., M.S. (University of Dhaka); M.B.A., Ph.D. (Darden School of Business, University of Virginia).

Richard J. Arend2,3 Contact Information; professor of strategy and entrepreneurship; B.A.Sc. (University of Toronto); M.B.A. (York University); Ph.D. (University of British Columbia); P.E..

Roy E. Baker; professor emeritus of accounting; B.S., M.B.A. (University of Kansas); D.B.A. (Harvard University); C.P.A.

Brian L. Belt; professor emeritus of business and public administration; B.I.E, M.S.I.E (Ohio State University); M.B.A. (Texas Christian University); Ph.D. (University of North Texas).

Barbara A. Bichelmeyer; provost, UMKC, and professor of management; B.S., B.A., Ph.D. (University of Kansas).

Lee G. Bolman2,3 Contact Information; Marion H. Bloch/Missouri Endowed Chair in Leadership; B.A. (Yale College); Ph.D. (Yale University).

Kimberly Church2 assistant professor of accounting; B.B.A. (Pittsburg State University); M.A. (Kansas State University); Ph.D. (University of Arkansas).

John Clark2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of finance; B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Alabama).

Charles Connely; teaching associate professor; B.B.A., MBA (University of Missouri - Kansas City).

David W. Cornell2 Contact Information; associate professor of accounting, associate dean, and interim chair, Department of Accountancy; B.S. (University of Kentucky); M.B.A. (Eastern Kentucky University); Ph.D. (Louisiana State University); C.P.A., C.M.A.

Nancy Day2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of human resources; B.S. (Missouri State University); M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City); Ph.D. (University of Kansas).

James R. DeLisle2 Contact Information; director of the Lewis White Real Estate Center and associate professor of entrepreneurship and innovation; B.B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin).

Kalpesh Kaushik Desai2,3 Contact Information; professor of marketing and supply chain management and interim chair, Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management; B.Commerce (Bombay University); M.B.A. (Jamnalal Bajaj Inst. of Mgmt. Studies, India); Ph.D. (University of Texas at Austin).

Pamela A. Rofol Dobies Contact Information; teaching assistant professor of leadership and organizational behavior; B.S. (Indiana University of Pennsylvania); M.P.A., I Ph.D. (University of Missouri-Kansas City).

David Donnelly2 Contact Information; professor of accounting; B.S.B.A., M.B.A. (Kansas State University); Ph.D. (University of Illinois); C.P.A.

Shad Dowlatshahi2,3 Contact Information; professor of operations management and supply chain management; B.S. (Tehran, Iran); M.B.A. (Emporia State University); M.S. (University of Missouri-Columbia); Ph.D. (University of Iowa).

William B. Eddy; dean emeritus, Bloch School, and professor emeritus; B.S., M.S. (Kansas State University); Ph.D. (Michigan State University).

Nolen M. Ellison; professor emeritus of public administration; B.S. (University of Kansas); Ph.D. (Michigan State University).

J. Randall Gardner2,3 Contact Information; professor of accounting; A.B. (Harvard University); M.B.A., J.D. (University of Kansas); LL.M., (University of Missouri-Kansas City); C.P.A.; C.F.P.

Larry R. Garrison2,3 Contact Information; Helen Kemper/Missouri Professor of accounting; B.S.B.A. (University of Central Missouri); M.S. (University of Missouri-Kansas City); Ph.D. (University of Nebraska-Lincoln); C.P.A.

Hye-Sung Han; Contact Information; assistant professor of urban administration; B.A., M.A. (Seoul National University); MCP (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); Ph.D. (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill).

Fred H. Hays2,3 Contact Information; Henry W. Bloch/Missouri Endowed Chair in financial services and chair, Department of Finance; B.B.A., M.S. (Baylor University); Ph.D. (Louisiana State University).

Scott Helm; teaching associate professor; B.A. (Washington College); M.P.A., Ph.D. (University of Missouri - Kansas City).

Robert D. Herman; professor emeritus of organizational behavior; B.A. (Kansas State University); M.S., Ph.D. (Cornell University).

Jack D. Heysinger; dean emeritus, Bloch School, and professor emeritus of law and administration; B.A., J.D. (University of Iowa); LL.M. (University of Michigan).

Gail Hoover-King; teaching associate professor of accounting; B.S.A., M.S.A. (University of Kansas); Ed.D (Northern Illinois University).

Jeffrey S. Hornsby2,3 Contact Information; professor of entrepreneurship and innovation / Henry W. Bloch Missouri Endowed Chair in entrepreneurship and innovation, and chair, Department of Global Entrepreneurship; B.A. (Miami University, Ohio); M.A. (Western Kentucky University); Ph.D. (Auburn University).

Doranne M. Hudson; Executive-in-Residence and teaching associate professor of leadership; B.A. (Duke University); M.S.W. (Washington University); M.B.A. (Harvard University).

Jeff S. Johnson2,3 Contact Information; assistant professor of marketing; B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. (University of Nebraska-Lincoln).

Karl F. Johnson; professor emeritus of public administration; B.B.A., M.P.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City); Ph.D. (University of Oregon).

Jae C. Jung2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of international business; B.A., M.B.A. (Korea University); Ph.D. (University of Western Ontario).

Allan Katz; Contact Information; distinguished professor of public affairs, B.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City); J.D. (American University Washington College of Law, Washington DC).

LaVern E. Krueger Contact Information; associate professor emeritus of accounting;  B.S. (University of Wisconsin - Whitewater); M.S.B.A. (University of Denver); D.B.A. (University of Colorado); C.P.A.

David Kuipers2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of finance; B.S. (Iowa State University); M.S. (University of Houston-Clear Lake); Ph.D. (University of Missouri-Columbia).

Atul Kulkarni2,3 Contact Information; assistant professor of marketing; B. Engg. (Pune University); M.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

Sarah Martin-Anderson2,3 Contact Information; assistant professor of health administration;  B.A. (California State University, Bakersfield); M.P.H., M.P.P., Ph.D. (University of California, Berkeley).

Nathan Mauck2,3 Contact Information; assistant professor of finance; B.S. (Kansas State University); Ph.D. (Florida State University).

Neil E. McNeill; associate professor emeritus of accounting; B.S. (University of Kansas); M.B.A. (University of Pittsburgh); D.B.A. (Harvard University); C.M.A.

Brent Never2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of nonprofit leadership; B.A. (Connecticut College); Ph.D. (Indiana University).

Mark Parry2,3 Contact Information; Ewing Marion Kauffman/Missouri Endowed Chair in Entrepreneurial Leadership and professor of marketing; B.A. (Metropolitan State College); M.A. (University of Texas-Arlington); Ph.D. (University of Texas-Dallas).

Nicholas Carl Peroff Contact Information; professor emeritus of public affairs and administration; B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

Roger A. Pick2,3 Contact Information; professor of management information systems; B.S. (University of Oklahoma); M.S., Ph.D. (Purdue University).

George E. Pinches; professor emeritus of business economics and finance; B.S., M.B.A. (Oklahoma State University); Ph.D. (Michigan State University).

Stephen W. Pruitt2,3 Contact Information; Arvin Gottleib/Missouri Endowed Chair in Business Economics and Finance; B.S. (Purdue University); M.B.A. (Ohio State University); Ph.D. (Florida State University).

Rita-Marie Cain Reid2,3 Contact Information; professor of business law; B.A. (Rockhurst University); J.D. (University of Kansas).

David O. Renz2,3 Contact Information; director of the Midwest Center for Nonprofit Leadership, Beth K. Smith/Missouri Endowed Chair in Nonprofit Leadership and chair, Department of Public Affairs; B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Minnesota).

Leon Robertson professor emeritus of strategic and international management; B.S., M.S. (Georgia Institute of Technology); Ph.D. (Georgia State University).

Probir Roy; associate professor emeritus of quantitative analysis; B.S. (Indian School of Mines); M.B.A. (Indian Institute of Management); Ph.D. (University of Cincinnati).

Leigh Salzsieder2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of accounting; B.A. (Drury University); M.B.A. (University of Kansas); Ph.D. (University of South Carolina).

Tammie Schaefer2,3 assistant professor of accounting; B.S., MBA (Rockhurst University); Ph.D. (University of South Carolina).

Robert D. Schrock; professor emeritus of finance; B.A. (McPherson College); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Kansas).

Eleanor Brantley Schwartz; chancellor emerita, UMKC; dean emerita, Bloch School; and professor emerita of business and public administration; B.A.A., M.B.A., D.B.A. (Georgia State University).

Sharon A. Simmons; Contact Information; assistant professor of entrepreneurship and innovation; B.S. (Hampton University), M.Acc., J.D. (University of Virginia), Ph.D. (Syracuse University).

Joseph F. Singer Contact Information; professor emeritus of business operations and analysis; B.S. (Morningside College); M.B.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City); Ph.D. (University of Arkansas).

Georgia Smedley2,3 Contact Information; associate professor of accounting; B.A. (Mesa College); M.S.A. (University of Arkansas); Ph.D. (Oklahoma State University).

Sunny Li Sun2,3 Contact Information; assistant professor of entrepreneurship and innovation; B.A. (Remin University of China); M.Phil. (Chinese University of Hong Kong); Ph.D. (University of Texas - Dallas).

Marilyn L. Taylor2,3 Contact Information; Arvin Gottlieb/Missouri Endowed Chair of Strategic Management; B.A. (University of South Florida); M.B.A., D.B.A. (Harvard University).

Sidne G. Ward2,3 Contact Information; director of global management education initiatives; associate professor of management information systems and chair, Department of Management; B.A., M.B.A. (University of Oklahoma); Ph.D. (University of California-Los Angeles).

Nancy Weatherholt2 Contact Information; associate professor of accounting; B.S.B., M.B.A., Ph.D. (University of Kansas).

Edwin H. White; professor emeritus of law and administration; A.B., J.D. (University of Missouri-Columbia); M.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City).

Anne Williamson; Contact Information; Victor and Caroline Schutte/Missouri Professor of Urban Affairs; B.B.A. (middle Tennessee State University); M.A. (University of Florida); Ph.D. (University of Georgia).

Walter B. Wright; dean emeritus of continuing education and extension; dean emeritus, Bloch School; and professor emeritus of business administration; B.A. (University of Iowa); M.B.A. (University of Kansas).

1

Associate or Adjunct Graduate Faculty

2

Members of UMKC Graduate Faculty

3

Members of UMKC Doctoral Faculty

4

Located at UM-St. Louis campus

Accounting Courses

ACCTNG 210 Introduction To Financial Accounting Credits: 3

An overview of basic concepts and terminology associated with reporting financial information to parties outside of an organization. This course requires students to take an accompanying lab that meets one day a week.

Prerequisites: MATH 110 (or equivalent) and completion of 30 credit hours.

ACCTNG 211 Introduction To Managerial Accounting Credits: 3

An introduction to the use of cost accounting concepts and information in managing the activities of a business.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 210 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 306 Introduction to the Accounting Profession and Procedures Credits: 3

A study of the profession of accounting, the accounting process, and tools used in implementing that process.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 210 or equivalent.

ACCTNG 307 Cost Management Credits: 3

A study of the principles and techniques of cost accounting with emphasis on the structure of cost accounting systems and the processing, summarizing and reporting of cost information. Topics include various issues relevant for manufacturing and service organizations, and introduction of situations that require the application of cost information to managerial settings.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 211 (or equivalent) and junior standing.

ACCTNG 310 Intermediate Accounting I Credits: 3

A study of theory and application of external corporate reporting. The course covers a variety of financial accounting issues including assets, liabilities, revenue recognition, and accounting change analysis. Publications and pronouncements of the accounting professions are emphasized where applicable.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 210 and Bloch student.

ACCTNG 311 Intermediate Accounting II Credits: 3

Continued study of intermediate accounting. The course covers a variety of financial accounting issues including corporate equities, income taxes, pensions, other post-employment benefits, leases, and the statement of cash flows. Publications and pronouncements of the accounting profession are emphasized where applicable.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 310 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 350 Accounting Systems And Controls Credits: 3

This course examines a number of systems employed to process accounting information, the internal control activities typically used in each system and associated documentation techniques.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 310, MIS 202.

ACCTNG 360 Accounting Research and Communications Credits: 3

A study of solving accounting issues by conducting research in the professional literature and communicating the results of that research to users.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 210 or equivalent, MGT 301.

ACCTNG 405 Auditing Credits: 3

A study of how the auditor determines the nature and amount of evidence that should be accumulated considering the unique aspects of an engagement, as well as some idea of how that evidence is evaluated in the context of a financial audit.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 311, ACCTNG 350 (or equivalents).

ACCTNG 408 Federal Income Taxation Credits: 3

An examination of the theory and practice of taxation as applied to individuals and businesses.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 211 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 409 Advanced Taxation Credits: 3

An examination of the theory, practice, and research methodology of taxation as applied to corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 408 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 411 Becker CPA Review Credit: 1

Structured review of materials for the financial, auditing, business environment, and regulatory sections of the CPA examination.

ACCTNG 412 Introduction to Income Taxation Credits: 3

An examination of the theory, practice, and research methodology of taxation as applied to individuals and business entities.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 211 or equivalent.

ACCTNG 418 Data Analytics for Accounting Credits: 3

Data Analytics is an investigation of the stories that large data stores can tell if only we know how to unravel them. As such, this course will examine big data sources from both a data-mining and a hypothesis-testing approach.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 405.

Cross Listings: ACCTNG 5568.

ACCTNG 420 Advanced Accounting Credits: 3

A study of the accounting for business combinations and the preparation of consolidated financial statements.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 311 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 421 Governmental/Not-For-Profit Accounting Credits: 3

An overview of accounting for state and local governments and not-for-profit entities. Pronouncements of the accounting profession are emphasized where applicable.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 311 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 464 Principles of Internal Auditing Credits: 3

A study of how the internal auditor determines the nature and amount of evidence that should be accumulated considering the unique aspects of an engagement, as well as some idea of how that evidence is evaluated in the context of a financial audit.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 311 and ACCTNG 350 or equivalent.

ACCTNG 470 Fraud Auditing Credits: 3

An examination of the elements of fraud and the fraud auditing process.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 405 or equivalent.

ACCTNG 482 Global Accounting Challenge Credits: 3

An international simulation of the challenges that exist when global teams address international accounting issues. Requires International travel.

ACCTNG 490 Becker CPA Review Funded Credit: 1

Structured review of materials for the Financial, Auditing, Business Environment and Regulatory sections of the CPA examination.

Prerequisites: Students must be within one year of exam eligibility.

ACCTNG 491 Becker CPA Review Partial Funding Credit: 1

Structured review of materials for the Financial, Auditing, Business Environment and Regulatory sections of the CPA examination.

Prerequisites: Student must be within one year of exam eligibility.

ACCTNG 492 Becker CPA Review Self Funded Credit: 1

Structured review of materials for the Financial, Auditing, Business Environment and Regulatory sections of the CPA examination.

Prerequisites: Student must be within one year of exam eligibility.

ACCTNG 496 Internship: Accounting Credit: 1

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community. Internship coursework is evaluated on a credit/no credit basis.

ACCTNG 497 Special Topics In Accounting Credits: 1-3

Study and research in accounting areas of special student interest, under individual faculty supervision and guidance.

Prerequisites: senior standing.

ACCTNG 5501 Finance Performance & Assessment Credit: 1.5

This course covers the fundamentals of financial reporting systems. The material is presented from a user perspective. This approach is intended to prepare students to use accounting information and will not necessarily result in students understanding the process used to record accounting transactions. Material is presented in a manner that emphasizes how accounting information is used for decision making.

ACCTNG 5510 Legal & Ethical Environment for Accountancy Credits: 3

The course exposes accounting students to major legal subjects and ethical issues that they will encounter on the CPA exam an in accountancy practice. Working individually and in groups, students will be asked to solve problems regarding business formation and securities regulation, intellectual property rights, contract formation and secured interests of creditors.

Prerequisites: MS Accountancy students who did not have any business law course as part of their undergraduate degree.

ACCTNG 5511 Becker CPA Review Credit: 1

Structured review of materials for financial, auditing, business environment, and regulatory sections of the CPA examination.

ACCTNG 5517 Survey Of Accounting Credits: 3

An overview of financial and managerial accounting. The course introduces the various reports that are used by stockholders, creditors, and managers to assess company performance and evaluate financial health. In addition, techniques are presented that assist firm managers in planning, control, and decision-making activities.

ACCTNG 5520 Financial Accounting and Reporting: The Language of Business Credits: 2

Focusing on the three main financial statements (the balance sheet, the income statement, and the statement of cash-flows), students develop an understanding of how transactions and events are captured in the accounting system and ultimately impact the financial statements. Students will learn the mechanics of financial accounting needed to analyze financial information while also considering how incentives influence the financial reporting process.

ACCTNG 5521 Managerial Accounting: Critical Data for Important Decisions Credits: 2

Covers the fundamental accounting tools and analytical skills managers use to make decisions in an innovative and globally competitive business environment. The vocabulary and mechanics of cost accounting, basic issues involved in the design of managerial accounting systems to provide decision useful information, and the role of managerial accounting resource allocation and performance evaluation.

ACCTNG 5550 Accounting Information Systems Credits: 3

This course examines a number if systems employed to process accounting information, the internal control activities typically used in each system, and associated documentation tools.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 310, MIS 202.

ACCTNG 5551 Governmental/Not-for-Profit Accounting Credits: 3

An overview of accounting for state and local governments and not-for-profit entities. Pronouncements of the accounting profession are emphasized where applicable.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 311 or equivalent.

ACCTNG 5556 Cost Management Credits: 3

A study of the principles and techniques of cost accounting with emphasis on the structure of cost accounting systems and the processing, summarizing, and reporting of cost information. Topics include various issues relevant for manufacturing and service organizations, and introduction of situations that requires the application of cost information to managerial settings.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5517 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5557 Introduction To Income Taxation Credits: 3

An investigation of the structure of federal, state, and local taxation, along with an examination of the impact of taxes on the management decision process. NOT available for students who have completed ACCTNG 408.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5517 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5558 Financial Accounting Theory Credits: 3

A study of the theory and practice of financial accounting with emphasis upon financial statement preparation and analysis of asset, liability, and equity measurement.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 310 or ACCTNG 5517 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5559 Advanced Financial Accounting Theory Credits: 3

A study of advanced topics in financial accounting. Topics include business combinations and financial statement consolidation theory and practice.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 311 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5560 Introduction To Auditing And Accounting Systems Credits: 3

Fundamentals underlying the design of accounting systems and the processing of accounting data. Current auditing standards and procedures are extensively investigated, with emphasis on the nature of internal control, audit evidence,and audit reports. NOT available for students who have completed ACCTNG 405.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5558 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5561 Personal Financial Planning Credits: 3

A study of the personal financial planning process and environment, with the goal of training participants to prepare integrated financial plans. Topics addressed include an overview of insurance, retirement, investments, debt management, tax issues, estate planning and professional ethics.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5517 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5564 Principles of Internal Auditing Credits: 3

A study of how the internal auditor determines the nature and amount of evidence that should be accumulated considering the unique aspects of an engagement, as well as some idea of how that evidence is evaluated in the context of a financial audit.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 311 and ACCTNG 350 or equivalent.

ACCTNG 5565 Advanced Accounting Systems Credits: 3

An in-depth analysis of various contemporary issues in accounting information systems.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 350 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5567 Information Systems Control And Audit Credits: 3

A study of the theory and practices employed to provide a secure computing environment. Potential threats to information systems as well as controls designed to counter those threats are emphasized.

Prerequisites: one previous graduate course in accounting systems, management information systems, or computer science.

ACCTNG 5568 Data Analytics for Accounting Credits: 3

Data Analytics is an investigation of the stories large data stores can tell if only we know how to unravel the story. As such, this course will investigate big data sources from both a data-mining and a hypothesis-testing approach.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 405 or equivalent.

ACCTNG 5569 Information Systems Consulting Credits: 3

An application of systems concepts to the evaluation of information systems of local organizations. Student teams will analyze, document and make recommendations for the improvement of these systems, and will communicate their findings via written reports and oral presentations.

Prerequisites: one graduate information systems course.

ACCTNG 5570 Fraud Auditing Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of accounting-based fraud and the fraud audit process. This course will examine fraud risks and ways to manage, prevent, and detect the occurrence of fraud.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 405 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5571 Individual Tax Problems Credits: 3

A study of substantive issues relating to individual taxation using the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations as sources. Topics include a detailed study of current issues such as alternative minimum tax, passive losses, and employee business expenses.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5557 (or concurrent enrollment in ACCTNG 409).

ACCTNG 5572 Tax Theory And Business Applications Credits: 3

A study of substantive issues relating to the taxation of business entities including multi-jurisdictional considerations. Topics include business formation and dissolution, business valuation, selection of business entity, compensation of employees, sales or exchanges of business property, and business tax credits.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 409 or ACCTNG 5557 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5573 Taxation Of Estates, Gifts, And Trusts Credits: 3

A study of substantive issues in the income taxation of estates and trusts and the taxation of estates and gifts using the Internal Revenue Code and A study of substantive issues in the income taxation of estates and trusts and the taxation of estates and gifts using the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations as sources. Emphasis will be placed on lifetime and post-mortem planning techniques as well as compliance requirements.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 409 or ACCTNG 5557 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5574 Tax Accounting Credits: 3

A study of substantive issues relating to the accounting aspects of federal income taxation. Topics include methods of income and expense reporting, adoption of and change in accounting periods and methods, and annual accounting and transactional concepts.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 409 or ACCTNG 5557 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5575 Managerial Accounting: Issues, Tools And Analysis Credits: 3

A look at various tools used to assist in the planning, control, performance evaluation, and decision-making activities of managers. Contemporary issues that confront management are introduced where appropriate.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 307 or ACCTNG 5556 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5576 Tax Research, Procedure And Practice Credits: 3

An introduction to research sources and methods with an emphasis on analysis and communication of conclusions. Administrative procedures of the Internal Revenue Service and the professional responsibilities of tax practitioners will also be addressed.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 409 or ACCTNG 5557.

ACCTNG 5577 Advanced Auditing Credits: 3

An analysis of real-world cases of audit problems with emphasis on red flags, pressures auditors face, and serious implications of audit failure (both perceived and real).

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 405 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5578 Current Problems In Accounting Credits: 3

This course will focus on an in-depth exploration of specific problems including, but not confined to those accounting problems which have resulted in official positions being published or considered by the accounting profession.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 420 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5579 Theory Of Income Determination Credits: 3

This course will consider the historical and cultural development of accounting principles and the relationship of those principles to economic concepts of profit and cost. Consideration of the economic aspects of accounting measurements will provide a vehicle for exploring accounting problem areas in terms of both internal and external reporting needs. Pertinent literature in the field will be explored as a basis for both oral and written reports.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 420 (or equivalent).

ACCTNG 5580 Financial Reporting Systems Credits: 2

Introduces generally accepted accounting principles and concepts along with the preparation and analysis of financial statements.

Prerequisites: Admission to Executive MBA Program.

ACCTNG 5582 Global Accounting Challenge Credits: 1-3

An international simulation of the challenges that exist when global teams address international accounting issues. Requires International travel.

ACCTNG 5587 Special Topics Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possible only offering of new topics.

ACCTNG 5590 Becker CPA Review Funded Credit: 1

Structured review of materials for the Financial, Auditing, Business Environment and Regulatory sections of the CPA examination.

Prerequisites: Student must be within one year of exam eligibility.

ACCTNG 5591 Becker CPA Review Partial Funding Credit: 1

Structured review of materials for the Financial, Auditing, Business Environment and Regulatory sections of the CPA examination.

Prerequisites: Student must be within one year of exam eligibility.

ACCTNG 5592 Becker CPA Review Self Funded Credit: 1

Structured review of materials for the Financial, Auditing, Business Environment and Regulatory sections of the CPA examination.

Prerequisites: Student must be within one year of exam eligibility.

ACCTNG 5595 Internship Credit: 1

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community.

ACCTNG 5597 Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

ACCTNG 5597B Special Topics In Accounting:Cost/Managerial Accounting Theory Credits: 1-3

ACCTNG 5597G Special Topics In Accounting:Personal Financial Planning Credits: 1-3

ACCTNG 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Courses

B&PA 524 Public Policy Context for Business Decisions Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide intensive exposure to the forces and personalities in Washington, D.C. that shape America's business policy. EMBA participants learn how to understand and anticipate the impact of public policy on their businesses and how to become more effective participants in the national decision-making process.

Prerequisites:Admission to the Executive MBA program.

Dec Science and Operation Mgmt Courses

DSOM 309 Intermediate Business Statistics Credits: 3

This course emphasizes statistical applications in business, and students will complete research projects using one or more multivariate statistical This course emphasizes statistical applications in business, and students will complete research projects using one or more multivariate statistical techniques. Topics covered will include statistical software (such as SAS or SPSS), multiple regression, Chi-Square, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods, multidiscriminant analysis, factor analysis, and a brief introduction to structural equation models.

Prerequisites: MATH 206 and STAT 235.

DSOM 326 Production/Operations Management Credits: 3

This course presents an introduction to the concepts, models, and methods of operations management. Students will study approaches to planning, scheduling, and controlling product and service facilities, processes, cost, quality, quantity, production, capacity, inventory, and distribution requirements. Computer applications and computer-based operations control systems will be introduced as a means to effectively manage the operations functions of both product and service organizations.

Prerequisites: ECON 202 and STAT 235.

DSOM 346 Management Analysis Credits: 3

This course examines the application of various scientific and mathematical methods to decision making in management, and makes use of spreadsheets and other software to construct and analyze practical methods of real-world systems. Applications will be based on topics such as project management, decision analysis, scheduling, queuing systems, simulation, optimization/allocation models, forecasting, and profitability analysis.

Prerequisites: DSOM 326 and MIS 202.

DSOM 431 Quality and Process Improvement Credits: 3

A study of planning and managing effective quality and processes in organizations. Students are expected to master important quality management and process improvement tools including Six Sigma, Statistical Process Control, TQM, Theory of Constraints, and other contemporary tools via appropriate software, case studies, and projects.

Prerequisites: DSOM 309 and DSOM 326.

DSOM 5505 Decision Sciences Credit: 1.5

Understanding the conceptual framework of statistics as it relates to business decision-making and problem solving. Most of the work will be done based on the real-life applications of statistical concepts to business problems and cases. The course includes the topics of descriptive statistics, probability distributions, tests of hypotheses, and multi-variate analysis.

DSOM 5507 Operations and Supply Chain Management Credit: 1.5

An integrating study that focuses on the models and methods of supply chain and operations management (SCOM). Managerial approaches to planning, scheduling, and controlling cost, time quality, production, inventory, services, and supply chain are studied. This survey course exposes students to supply chain management, ERP systems, lean/just-in-time, total quality management, e-commerce, and other contemporary SCOM topics in both product and service-oriented organizations.

DSOM 5508 Statistical Analysis In Business Credits: 3

Data analysis and statistical inference in the context of business management. Communication of analysis and conclusions using text, numbers, and graphics is emphasized. Understanding the conceptual framework of probability and statistics as it relates to statistical tests and procedures is emphasized more than computational methods. Most of the work will be done using a computer spreadsheet. The course includes the topics of estimation, tests of hypotheses, analysis of variance, and multiple regression.

DSOM 5509 Applied Statistical Methods Credits: 2

Investigates the use of detailed sample data for purposes of estimating, predicting, forecasting, and explaining correlations among varied observations. Students will apply the concepts of probability theory, central tendency, sampling, inference, modeling, and forecasting to help solve managerial problems and support decision processes.

Prerequisites: Admission to Executive MBA Program.

DSOM 5522 Managerial Statistics and Quantitative Decision Making Credits: 2

Managerial statistics introduces the student to the statistical methodology used in making business decisions. The ethics of accurately presenting results without bias is emphasized. Concepts of probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, correlation, regression, and ANCOVA are examined in the context of business and organization applications and solving statistical problems using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS).

DSOM 5524 Data Analytics and Quantitative Decision Making Credits: 2

Students learn how to use business analytics in support of managerial decision making. Decision analysis, forecasting, simulations, risk analysis, optimization models, and sensitivity analysis will be covered.

DSOM 5525 Operations and Supply Chain Management Credits: 2

An examination of the basic principles and strategies used to manage the production and distribution of goods and services. This course positions operations management (OM) as an important tool for achieving strategic leadership through competitive advantage, and illustrates how the managerial integration of OM functions with corporate strategy improves business processes. Concepts covered in the course include (but are not limited to) operations strategy, process management, world class SCM, strategic sourcing, and quality management. Emphasis will be placed on the application of these concepts to actual business situations.

Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the Full-Time MBA program and in good academic standing.

DSOM 5540 Service Operations Management Credits: 3

This course focuses on the increasing importance and role of service in our economy. Topics studied are: the role of services in an economy, the nature of services, service strategy, the service delivery system, service facility location, the service encounter, service quality, productivity and quality improvement. Methods of process analysis in service organizations, methods improvement procedures, and work measurement techniques are developed to provide the basis for analyses of processes, layouts, and job design in a service organization.

Prerequisites: DSOM 5519 (or equivalent).

DSOM 5542 ERP-Enterprise Resource Planning Systems Credits: 3

Discusses the design and implementation of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT). This includes just-in-time (JIT) systems, cellular and flexible manufacturing systems (CM & FMS), computer integrated manufacturing (CIM), and enterprise resource Planning (ERP) systems. It also explores the role that manufacturing plays in product development efforts and cross-functional teams. Other topics such as manufacturing strategy, maintenance, set-up and lot size reductions, group technology and focused factories, production and operations scheduling and control techniques, and the design of work systems are presented as well. Case Studies and group projects/presentations are used for instructional purposes. Students are also required to use the MAX software to perform an ERP system analysis.

Prerequisites: DSOM 5519 (or equivalent).

DSOM 5543 Project Management Credits: 3

Planning and control of projects, to include network models, risk analysis, time reduction, resource scheduling, leadership, and evaluation.

Prerequisites: DSOM 5519 (or equivalent).

DSOM 5544 Global Supply Chain and Logistics Management Credits: 3

A study of integrated global supply chain management and logistics. Topics include integrating global ERP and forecasting systems, inventory management, distribution requirements planning, supply chain management, purchasing and supplier/vendor networks, logistics, transportation networks, and E-operations. ERP systems and network optimization are studied relative to both production and service operations.

Prerequisites: DSOM 5519 (or equivalent).

DSOM 5545 Strategic Sourcing & Supplier Relationship Management Credits: 3

This course explores the roles of procurement and strategic sourcing as components of an overall supply chain strategy, and the impact this strategy has on the competitive success and profitability of organizations. The course will be structured into three segments: before you source, how to source, and after sourcing. Topics will include spend analysis, supplier research, market analysis, supplier evaluation, global sourcing considerations, negotiating, and supplier relationship management. The students will also gain an appreciation of the ethical, contractual, risk management, sustainability, and legal issues faced by purchasing professionals.

DSOM 5566 Operations Management for World Class Competitiveness Credits: 2

An examination of the basic principles and strategies used to manage the production and distribution of goods and services. This course positions operations management (OM) as an important tool for achieving strategic leadership through competitive advantage, and illustrates how the managerial integration of OM functions with corporate strategy improves business processes.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Executive MBA program.

DSOM 5587 Special Topics Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possible only offering of new topics.

DSOM 5595 Internship Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community.

DSOM 5597 Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

DSOM 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Entrepreneurship & Innovation Courses

ENT 215 Introduction to Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the excitement and challenges of building their own businesses. It focuses on identifying and evaluating entrepreneurial opportunities, as well as identifying what it takes to get a new venture off the ground. The course is enriched with real-life examples, including case studies of start-ups and personal stories from local entrepreneurs. The instructor emphasizes active, hands-on learning; additionally, student teams will get a taste for starting and running a company through a computerized business simulation.

ENT 315 Introduction to Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the excitement and challenges of building their own businesses. It focuses on identifying and evaluating entrepreneurial opportunities, as well as identifying what it takes to get a new venture off the ground. The course is enriched with real-life examples, including case studies of start-ups and personal stories from local entrepreneurs. The instructor emphasizes active, hands-on learning; additionally, student teams will get a taste for starting and running a company through a computerized business simulation.

ENT 321 Real Estate Principles Credits: 3

Starting with the basics of real estate terminology, students learn real estate's role in the economy, it's legal foundations, government controls, appraisal processes, valuation processes, brokering and closing transactions, time value of money, basic management issues and lease clauses, and basic standard form purchase contracts.

ENT 326 Creativity, Innovation, and Problem Solving Credits: 3

This course examines creativity and innovation, and their application to problem solving and developing new initiatives. Students will develop the ability to understand and solve problems and initiate opportunities by thinking new things. They will understand the concepts, skills, information, attitudes, and resources that leaders need to create valuable ideas, products, or initiatives.

ENT 327 Creating the New Venture: Experiential Learning Credits: 3

This course guides students through the process, experiences, and requirements for creating a new venture and planning for operations up to the point of securing customers and generating first revenues. Key course actions include developing a business plan for the new venture, examining the initial steps for start-up and operational launch, and preparing for securing of customers/revenues.

Prerequisites: ENT 215, or ENT 315.

ENT 332 Managing the New Venture: Experiential Learning Credits: 3

In this course, students will acquire the skill sets needed to manage and grow a successful new venture, and will actually manage a new enterprise.

ENT 341 Technology Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

This course is designed to familiarize students with the creation of successful, high-value enterprises, with an emphasis on markets for technology and venture capital. Students identify a business opportunity, create a technology-based solution, and assess the commercial and technological viability of the business opportunity. Case studies will emphasize life sciences, engineering, and information technologies.

ENT 361 New Product Development Credits: 3

This course introduces students to a formal process used to develop new products and services. Throughout the process, students learn how an abstract idea can be transformed into concrete product concepts that will in turn be translated into tangible working prototypes.

ENT 364 Entrepreneurial Management and Innovation Credits: 3

Students are exposed to the unique entrepreneurial experience of conceiving, evaluating, creating, managing, and eventually selling a business. The goal is to provide a comprehensive background with practical application of important concepts applicable to an entrepreneurial environment. Key business areas of finance, accounting, marketing, and management will be addressed from an entrepreneurial perspective.

ENT 412 Entrepreneurial Finance and Venture Capital Investment Credits: 3

This course examines the financing and valuation of new ventures from the perspectives of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. The focus is on financial thinking, tools, and techniques that are relevant for seeking new venture financing and making investment decisions. The course is suitable for anyone with an interest in startup companies, venture capital, or private equity firms.

ENT 421 Real Estate Finance Fundamentals Credits: 3

This course will provide a fundamental understanding of basic financial concepts of real estate including compounding and discounting, construction of amortization tables and after-tax yield analysis for a simple real estate investment. It also touches on the basics of title insurance, ownership issues, fixed rate verses variable rate mortgages in residential real estate, understanding housing bubbles, and trends in valuation of residential real estate. In addition, the student will complete mathematical comparisons of leasing versus owning a home.

ENT 432 Entrepreneurial Marketing and Selling Credits: 3

This course exposes students to the objectives, challenges, and requirements for effective, results-oriented marketing activities and sales efforts for the entrepreneur/new venture. Key topics include the selection, design, and budgeting of entrepreneurial marketing and advertising programs, along with effective selling, customer acquisition, and service/retention efforts.

ENT 460 Creating the Enterprise Credits: 3

This course looks at the processes and skills individuals require in order to create their own enterprise, manage a new business, or work within an entrepreneurial organization. Students will learn how to take a good idea, assess that idea, and develop an appropriate business model, and will work in teams to develop a full-length business plan.

Prerequisites: (or concurrent) ACCTNG 211, FIN 325, MKT 324, MGT 330, DSOM 326.

ENT 496 Internship: Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-3

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business or organization in the community.

ENT 497 Special Topics: Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-3

Study and research in areas of special interest under individually faculty direction.

ENT 497A Special Topics: Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-3

Study and research in areas of special interest under individually faculty direction.

ENT 497B Special Topics: Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-3

Study and research in areas of special interest under individually faculty direction.

ENT 5502 Introduction to Entrepreneurship Credit: 1.5

This course helps students develop insight into what it takes to launch a successful startup. The primary focus is on opportunity identification and evaluation. This is accomplished by examining the characteristics of a good entrepreneurial opportunity and the steps required to get a business up and running.

ENT 5515 Entrepreneurship Boot Camp Credits: 3

This course provides students with an understanding of the process for identifying and evaluating entrepreneurial opportunities. Students will also learn how strategy, marketing, financial and legal structure, and cash flow affect opportunities in terms of execution and growth, and how to position a new firm for success. The course will encourage students to reflect on their own entrepreneurial potential and to evaluate entrepreneurship as a potential career path. Even those who do not feel that they are entrepreneurs will benefit by discovering how to function more effectively in entrepreneurial organizations. Furthermore, those responsible for technical innovation and business development within existing organizations should find this course helps them to create value and distinguish themselves in their work performance.

ENT 5525 Entrepreneurship: Managing Creativity And Innovation Credits: 3

The course examines the nature of creativity and innovation and how entrepreneurship involves the ability to identify market opportunity based on new ideas. Detailed attention is given to the entrepreneurial process: the concepts, skills, know-how and know-who, information, attitudes, alternatives and resources that entrepreneurs need to manage creativity in the process of creating something with tangible economic value.

ENT 5527 Creating the New Venture Experiential Learning Credits: 3

This course guides students through the process, experiences, and requirements for creating a new venture and planning for operations up to the point of securing customers and generating first revenues. Key course actions include developing a business plan for the new venture, examining the initial steps for start-up and operational launch, and taking the initial steps to secure customers/revenues.

ENT 5530 Creative Problem Solving: From Ideation to Implementation Credits: 2

Students develop critical thinking and facilitation skills to improve effectiveness in individual and team problem solving that requires creativity for an innovative solution. Each problem, situation, team, and organization have unique characteristics that will influence the appropriateness and effectiveness of particular problem solving processes and techniques. Using several CPS models, divergent and convergent thinking techniques, leadership skills, and facilitation skills students develop creative responses to challenging problems in organizations and work groups.

ENT 5531 New Product Development Credits: 2

A systematic overview of the management issues that arise during the process of new product development (NPD). Students learn integration across the traditional management functions and the tools and concepts for linking development to strategy and for managing the development process for speed, efficiency, and market impact. Students will develop a physical prototype of a product that meets and exceeds real customer needs.

ENT 5532 Managing the New Venture Experiential Learning Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide students an experiential learning opportunity in running a new business. In particular, students will run the business that they started in ENT 5527. Students will define and deliver products and services to real business customers and clients; negotiate with suppliers, administrative agencies and other stakeholders; obtain financing for on-going company relations; and be held accountable for cash flows and company budgets.

Prerequisites: ENT 5527.

ENT 5533 Technology Commercialization and Business Planning Credits: 2

Exploration of screen technology opportunities in diverse areas, from information systems to telecommunications, biotechnology, intellectual property acquisition, creation, and protection. Students will learn how to license technology that others have patented, and how to license their own technology to others and create diverse revenue streams.

ENT 5535 Small Business Management And Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

This course focuses on the nature of the entrepreneurial organization; its volatility and flux, where standard operating procedures are lacking and organizational structure, culture and leadership style are created anew each day. Successful small business management requires that a series of developmental challenges be identified and addressed if the venture is to succeed.

ENT 5545 Entrepreneurship And New Venture Creation Credits: 3

The objectives of this course are: (1) to build personal appreciation for the challenges and rewards of entrepreneurship in an independent mode by examining/simulating its environment; (2) to present and examine, through the use of complex case studies and high level guest/lectures, economic, legal and managerial mechanisms proven useful in creating new wealth; and (3) to foster continued development of venture ideas, suitable as career entry options or for investments, using a tutorial approach to business plan development, presentation and evaluation.

ENT 5549 Meeting the Management Challenge: The Role of Corporate Entrepreneurship and Innovation Credits: 2

Students learn the skills required to develop new ideas and create viable new businesses within the context of an established organization. The development of an internal culture of innovation, processes for reviewing ideas and for developing business concepts, strategic analysis, and positioning for competitive advantage will be explored.

ENT 5552 Entrepreneurial Marketing Credits: 3

This course exposes students to the objectives, challenges, and requirements for effective, results-oriented marketing activities and sales efforts for the entrepreneur/new venture. Key topics include the selection, design, and budgeting of entrepreneurial marketing and advertising programs, along with effective selling, customer acquisition, and service/retention efforts.

ENT 5561 New Venture Creation and Product Innovation Credits: 2

This course covers the first part of a two-course sequence and brings together several disciplines students have encountered in the first year of the Executive MBA program curriculum. Students will gain experience in new venture creation and product innovation management. A management simulation will serve as a continuing, evolving "case" in which course participants working in teams assume the role of CEO.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Executive MBA program.

ENT 5563 Social Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

This course introduces students to social entrepreneurship through lectures and discussions, key readings, guest speakers such as social entrepreneurs, case studies, videos, service-learning activities, and group assignments. Students will develop an understanding of the social entrepreneurship process, the differences between social entrepreneurship and business entrepreneurship, social enterprise, and different revenue streams including the importance of sustainability. In this course, students will develop a social entrepreneurship project proposal on a social problem in collaboration with a non-profit organization in the Kansas City area.

Prerequisites: None

ENT 5567 Innovation & Entrepreneurship I Credits: 2

This course, the first of a two-course sequence, covers the entrepreneurial and innovation process from conception to birth of the new business. It looks at both process and people involved in assessing ideas, exploiting opportunities, and converting concepts into high-growth businesses. Application of the processes will be extended to both start-ups and well as new business groups within existing organizations, with an emphasis on nurturing a climate of innovation. Students will identify opportunities for high-growth potential new enterprises, develop a business plan, and present their plans to a panel of potential investors and/or senior managers.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Executive MBA program.

ENT 5571 Advanced Real Estate Finance Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the full spectrum of real estate finance and investment analysis. It helps students quantify the financial implications of various real estate decisions for individual properties as well as more strategic decision-making applied to real estate portfolios. Using a combination of experiential and incremental learning students develop the foundation skills necessary to support more advanced concepts and financial theory. The course explores time value of money, law, leverage, underwriting, discounted cash flow, investment analysis, and capital markets. Students also develop advanced modeling skills and learn how to apply state-of-the art financial packages to support decisions.

Prerequisites: RL-EST 5556.

ENT 5572 MBA Capstone Experience-Business Plan for a Startup Company Credits: 3

Class participants will develop a business plan for a startup company. The plan must demonstrate understanding of the product or service, and appropriate analyses including opportunity assessment for the new product/service, specifying the skills of the management team and the organization that the company will need to develop, the business model, the market, the industry including competitors, alternatives and choices for operations, the information systems and reports the management team will need, the milestones that investors should realistically expect the new entity to meet, and the financial requirements of the company in its early phases.

ENT 5573 Real Estate Market Analysis and Feasibility Study Credits: 3

This course helps students develop entrepreneurial, fact-based approaches to problem-solving and decision support. It incorporates experiential learning to help students deploy quantitative and qualitative approaches that incorporate the perspectives of space users, space producers, and market facilitators. Students learn how to address the goals and objectives of a particular client, while also considering the externalities and impacts such decisions have on the built environment. Students will integrate critical thinking with spatial and financial analytical methods and state-of-the-art tools to quantify market demand and to translate that demand to a spatial solution that is marketable and financially feasible.

Prerequisites: RL-EST 5556.

ENT 5576 Real Estate Property Management Credits: 3

This course explores the complexities and integration of property and portfolio management which are critical to the creation, control and capture of real estate value. Students learn how to approach real estate in a more holistic manner by integrating management functions that range from individual property types to portfolios of properties. Students learn how to incorporate marketplace factors in their decisions and apply modern portfolio theory and other tools to construct and manage properties and portfolios in a socially responsible manner. Using experiential methods students learn to apply critical thinking to solve complex property and portfolio management problems.

Prerequisites: ENT 5571.

ENT 5578 Legal Context of Real Estate Decision Making Credits: 3

This course introduces decisions involved in the development, ownership, and operation of commercial real estate and the legal issues associated with these decisions. Topics covered include: due diligence, loan application/brokerage agreements, zoning, easements, entitlements and condemnation actions, bankruptcy, commercial real estate insurance coverage, choice of business entity, income tax planning, and joint ventures.

ENT 5585 Entrepreneurial Finance and Venture Capital Investment Credits: 3

This course exposes students to the process of financing and investing in a new venture. The primary objective of this course is for students to develop a good understanding of the objectives, strategies, and challenges in financing and valuation of entrepreneurial firms through analyzing unique financial issues these firms and their investors face. Students will develop skills for assessing new venture financial viability, cash needs, funding sources, valuation, and funding structure.

ENT 5587 Seminar In Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-6

A course on advanced and/or new topics. This course is designed to facilitate at least one of two purposes: An initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possibly final offering on a new topic. New topics include those that are contemporary, cutting edge, or advanced topics that are not currently covered by existing courses.

ENT 5587A Seminar In Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-6

A course on advanced and/or new topics. This course is designed to facilitate at least one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possibly final offering on a new topic. New topics include those that are contemporary, cutting edge, or advanced topics that are not currently covered by existing courses.

ENT 5587B Seminar In Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-6

A course on advanced and/or new topics. This course is designed to facilitate at least one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possibly final offering on a new topic. New topics include those that are contemporary, cutting edge, or advanced topics that are not currently covered by existing courses.

ENT 5587C Seminar In Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-6

A course on advanced and/or new topics. This course is designed to facilitate at least one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possibly final offering on a new topic. New topics include those that are contemporary, cutting edge, or advanced topics that are not currently covered by existing courses.

ENT 5587D Seminar In Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-6

A course on advanced and/or new topics. This course is designed to facilitate at least one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possibly final offering on a new topic. New topics include those that are contemporary, cutting edge, or advanced topics that are not currently covered by existing courses.

ENT 5587E Seminar In Entrepreneurship Credits: 1-6

A course on advanced and/or new topics. This course is designed to facilitate at least one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possibly final offering on a new topic. New topics include those that are contemporary, cutting edge, or advanced topics that are not currently covered by existing courses.

ENT 5591 Small Business Management Practicum Credits: 3

An integrated management course designed to examine the principles of business management applicable to solving the problems of small and medium size businesses and assisting in their development.

ENT 5595 Internship Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community.

ENT 5597 Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

ENT 5681 Multivariate Statistical Methods-II Credits: 3

Theoretical and research applications of MANOVA, canonical correlation, multiple discriminant analysis, factor analysis, and introduction to structural equation modeling using appropriate software. Students are expected to undertake a major research project during this class and to apply appropriate multivariate statistical analyses to their chosen academic research topic.

ENT 5682 Structural Equation Modeling Credits: 3

This course presents structural equation modeling. It includes a review of regression, as well as the study of path analysis, including model specification, methods of estimation, recursive and non-recursive models; direct, indirect, and total effects methods of estimation; single and multi-group analyses; moderators; mediators; structural equation model specification; identification, methods of estimation, second-order factor analysis, and the assessment of casual structure. Students are expected to continue a research project started in ENT 5681.

ENT 5683 Mathematical Models For Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to mathematical models in entrepreneurship and related disciplines. Classes will focus on the use of mathematical models to characterize the nature of various entrepreneurship-related decisions in complex environments. For each topic considered (e.g., R&D investment decisions in new product entry, diffusion, and marketing mix variables), students will examine select examples of scholarly articles. Presentations and discussions are designed to help students understand and critique existing models and stimulate the development of new theoretical viewpoints.

ENT 5691 Doctoral Seminar In Theoretical Foundations Of Entrepreneurship I Credits: 3

ENT 5691 is designed as a broad survey of major topics in the field of entrepreneurship. Its objective is to familiarize students with some of the primary theoretical underpinnings of the field as well as some of the common and/or promising methodological approaches to the study of entrepreneurial phenomena. Topics covered in the course include a theoretical overview, entrepreneurs, environment and organizational founding.

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing.

ENT 5692 Foundations Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

ENT 5692 is designed as a continuation of ENT 5691, providing a broad survey of major topics in the field of entrepreneurship. Its objective is to familiarize the student with some of the primary theoretical underpinnings of the field as well as some of the common and/or promising methodological approaches to the study of entrepreneurial phenomena. Topics covered in the course include: entrepreneurship's links with other diciplines, venture capital and venture capitalists, new venture strategy, new venture performance, growth processes and challenges, and entrepreneurial networks and alliances.

ENT 5693 Technology, Innovation, And Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

This seminar will explore academic literature of technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Specific topics include emerging technologies, evolutionary theory, building capabilities based on networks, organizational learning, technological innovation, institutional economics, network externalities, knowledge transfer, technological trajectories and path dependencies.

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing.

ENT 5694 Doctoral Seminar In Theories Of The Fim And Strategy Credits: 3

In this course, students will become familiar with and develop an in-depth understanding of the concepts, models, and paradigms that collectively form the foundation for strategic thinking. Students will develop the ability to critically integrate findings from strategic research programs. Employing an appreciation for the interdisciplinary nature of strategic marketing and management, the purpose is to develop a keen awareness of major gaps that exist in the strategic literature. Students will strengthen the skills needed to conduct original strategic marketing research that can be published in the leading academic journals.

Prerequisites: Doctoral Standing.

ENT 5699 Dissertation and Research in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Credits: 1-12

Dissertation research and writing in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Discipline.

ENT 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Finance Courses

FIN 325 Financial Management Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of the relationship between business decisions and the value of the firm, as determined by the marketplace. Students will study the composition of capital structure, capital budgeting, and cost of capital theory, including incremental analysis of investment situations.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 210.

FIN 326 Financial Management 2 Credits: 3

Explores leverage and capital structure, dividend policy, raising capital, short-term financial planning, working capital management and international financial management. FIN 326 builds on the content of FIN 325. A cursory knowledge of accounting principles is assumed, as well as fluency with simple algebra and arithmetic skills.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 210, FIN 325.

FIN 340 Global Financial Markets and Institutions Credits: 3

Students are introduced to global financial markets and institutions as well as the regulators. Topics include financial instruments, past and current global financial crises, financial restructuring and reforms, and the interrelationships between financial and real economies.

Prerequisites: FIN 325.

FIN 345 Investments Credits: 3

The course develops the theoretical framework necessary for a systematic approach to portfolio management. Content includes consideration of investment objectives, measurement of risk and returns, alternative uses of invested funds, analysis of securities markets, and the techniques of security analysis. Students will have an opportunity for the creation and management of an investment portfolio.

Prerequisites: FIN 325.

FIN 350 Introduction to Risk Management and Insurance Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the principles of personal and corporate risk management. Personal risk management topics include: personal insurance planning, annuity investing and personal liability management. Corporate risk management topics include: managing corporate risk, reducing risk through hedging, and legal liability risk.

FIN 351 International Financial Management Credits: 3

The world's business activities and economics are becoming more integrated. This course provides an introduction, appreciation and understanding of how this process impacts financial decisions for global business. Students should expect to develop an integrated analytical and decision making perspective that will enable them to extend financial concepts such as capital budgeting and risk management, and instruments such as forwards, swaps, fixed income analysis, arbitrage, etc. to their international analogs.

Prerequisites: FIN 325 (or equivalent).

FIN 369 Payment Systems Credits: 3

The payment system is central to virtually all economic transactions. The payment system also has been undergoing fundamental changes over the past two decades. Yet, the payment system is one of the least understood parts of the economic system. The purpose of this course is to examine the payment system from economic, business, and regulatory standpoints.

FIN 419 Financial Statement Analysis Credits: 3

Students will take an in-depth look at the external financial statements that are prepared by corporations, including the tools needed to organize, summarize, and understand corporate financial data for use in decision making. Ratio analysis, trend analysis, earnings forecasting, bankruptcy predictors, statistical methods important to finance, and financial data bases are among the topics that will be covered.

Prerequisites: FIN 325 and must have junior standing with a major or minor within the Bloch School of Management.

FIN 428 Commercial Bank Management Credits: 3

This course presents an overview of financial management of the interest spreads, credit risk, liquidity, and capital positions of commercial banks. Topics to be covered include analysis of bank profitability, lending functions and policy, securities investment strategies, fund attraction, regulatory examination, capital adequacy, and integrated asset/liability management. Instructional media includes cases and computerized bank management simulation.

Prerequisites: ECON 202, FIN 325.

FIN 435 Advanced Corporate Finance Credits: 3

The course focuses on the finance function of the firm from the managerial perspective. Topics include working capital management, capital budgeting, financial structure, merger and reorganization, capital rationing, and analysis of risk. Students will use cases and computer techniques.

Prerequisites: FIN 325.

FIN 445 Advanced Investments Credits: 3

Students take an in depth look at some of the advanced investment analysis tools used by practicing portfolio managers. This course covers the valuation of both derivative securities and fixed-income securities. There is also a strong focus on managing price risk, interest rate risk, and exchange rate risk. In addition there is an emphasis on bond portfolio management and derivative security applications.

Prerequisites: FIN 345.

FIN 496 Internship: Finance Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community. Internship coursework is evaluated on a credit/no credit basis.

FIN 497 Special Topics: Finance Credits: 1-3

Study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

Prerequisites: senior standing.

FIN 5501 Economics For Administration Credits: 3

This course is designed for graduate students in the School of Business and Public Administration. Topics include the theory and determination of national income, fiscal policy, monetary theory and policy, production and cost theory, and market structure.

FIN 5502 Corporate Financial Management I Credit: 1.5

This course provides a rigorous distillation of time value of money analysis techniques, methods which form the basic quantitative approach used in corporation finance. The three main topic areas covered during the course are the principles of time value of money analysis itself, its application to the valuation of corporate bond and equity securities, and the quantitative decision making rules utilized in corporate capital budgeting analysis.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5501.

FIN 5504 Managerial Economics Credit: 1.5

This course applies microeconomic principles to for-profit and not-for-profit enterprises. Topics include: supply, demand, elasticity, equilibrium, cost and production theory, factor pricing, market structure and pricing and public policy toward business.

FIN 5505 Global Macroeconomics Credit: 1.5

Global Macroeconomics examines fiscal and monetary policies in the US as well as other countries. It considers issues of international trade, exchange rates and coordination of economic policies as well as economic integration and fiscal and financial crisis management.

FIN 5507 Corporate Financial Management II Credit: 1.5

This course provides a continuation of the study of corporate financial management principles introduced in FIN 5502. Specific topics covered in this course include the study of detailed corporate capital budgeting problems, the fundamental risk versus return paradigm encountered in financial markets, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, and the cost of investment capital for a business enterprise.

FIN 5515 Managerial Economics Credits: 2

This course studies the relationships between the economic theory and system as a whole and the ways in which their functioning is affected by the behavior of the interdependent sectors of which they are composed. Students will explore the major factors and determinants of economic prospects relevant to profit-maximizing production and pricing decisions for the firm.

Prerequisites: admission to executive MBA program.

FIN 5532 Financial Management Credits: 3

An introduction to the role of financial management through the development of a conceptual framework appropriate for financial decision making. Generally, financial management is charged with the responsibility for obtaining and effectively utilizing the funds necessary for the operation of an enterprise. As such, the conceptual framework includes elements of financial planning (financial analysis, cash budgeting and profit planning), capital budgeting (rate of return and cost of capital), and basic considerations of alternative sources of funds.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5517, DSOM 5508, and FIN 5501 (or equivalents).

FIN 5534 Thinking Critically: The Role of Incentives and Human Behavior Credits: 2

An overview of the economics of rational decision-making drawing on recent developments in behavioral economics and theory. Students learn how human beings make decisions in the presence of uncertainty, limited information and the crucial role of human resourcefulness, incentives, and trade-offs in predicting the ultimate effects of decision-making outcomes.

FIN 5535 Contemporary Techniques of Financial Analysis Credits: 2

Students learn to effectively analyze crucial financial decisions involving asset allocation and valuation. Time value of money, capital budgeting techniques, cash flow estimation, risk and return, and the calculation of a company's cost-of-capital are taught through hands-on analysis of real-world problems.

FIN 5536 The New Corporate Finance: Where Theory Meets Practice Credits: 2

Focusing on critical developments in finance theory and practice from an upper-level or “boardroom” perspective. Emphasis is on the critical financial decisions made at the highest levels of an enterprise such as agency conflicts, signaling theory, derivatives, and capital structure and dividend decisions.

FIN 5537 Enterprise Risk Management Credits: 2

Students conduct a comprehensive assessment of the physical, reputation, emotional, financial, and facilities risks associated with an organization and its events. They must also assess each risk based on its probability of occurrence and severity of consequences and make decisions about accepting, modifying, transferring, and/or eliminating risks based on those assessments.

FIN 5550 Advanced Financial Management Theory And Policies Credits: 3

Advanced financial management covering topics such as working capital, financial structure, cost of capital, dividend policy and valuation. Discussions include both financial theory as well as financial policy. Includes exposure to literature central to the development of finance theory.

Prerequisites: Six hours of finance coursework beyond FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5551 International Financial Management Credits: 3

This course analyzes present and future international financial market conditions and extends the decision-making tasks of financial management into the context of problems of the international and foreign financial systems. The financial constraints of the international business environment and their effect on standard concepts of financial management are studied along with international currency flows, capital structure problems, working capital management, foreign investment, and international banking practices.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5552 Global Financial Markets and Institutions Credits: 3

Students are introduced to global financial markets and institutions. Topics include equity, debt, commodity, housing, and foreign exchange markets both in the U.S. and globally. The course explores the effects of monetary and fiscal policy, with emphasis on past and current global financial crises, financial restructuring and reforms, as well as the interrelationships between financial and real economies.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5553 Investment Analysis Credits: 3

Development of a theoretical framework applicable to the solution of problems related to creation and management of the investment portfolio. Consideration is given to the analysis of risk, functions of security markets, sources of information, evaluation of securities, and measurement of investment return.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5556 Management Of Financial Intermediaries Credits: 3

This course addresses the management operations of selected financial intermediaries including commercial banks and thrift institutions. Attention is given to asset-liability structure, the development and delivery of financial services, institutional structure, legal and regulatory factors, and the dynamics of the competitive environment.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5557 Derivative Securities Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of financial risk management. The student should develop a working knowledge of issues regarding both the theoretical valuation and application of derivative securities. Applications will focus on techniques designed to manage financial risks in the corporate environment. Specifically, the course will focus on using futures, options, and swaps to hedge financial risks. Valuation issues will be explored to identify theoretical pricing fundamentals that can be applied toward valuing newly developed securities.

Prerequisites: FIN 5501, FIN 5532, DSOM 5508, and ACCTNG 5517, or equivalents.

FIN 5559 Strategic Financial Management Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of financial risk management. The student should develop a working knowledge of issues regarding both the theoretical valuation and application of derivative securities. Applications will focus on techniques designed to manage financial risks in the corporate environment. Specifically, the course will focus on using futures, options, and swaps to hedge financial risks. Valuation issues will be explored to identify theoretical pricing fundamentals that can be applied toward valuing newly developed securities.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 5517, DSOM 5508, FIN 5501, and FIN 5532 (or equivalents).

FIN 5560 Financial Modeling Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to some of the fundamental quantitative methods used in investment analysis. The student should develop a working knowledge of measuring risk and return, probability theory, sampling and estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, regression and time series analysis, The course will emphasize experimental learning by applying these concepts to real data in a spreadsheet environment.

Prerequisites: Completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics and finance.

FIN 5561 Financial Statement Analysis Credits: 3

Students will take an in-depth look at the external financial statements that are prepared by corporations, including the tools needed to organize, summarize, and understand corporate financial data for use in decision making. Ratio analysis, trend analysis, earnings forecasting, bankruptcy predictors statistical methods important to finance, and financial data bases are among the topics that will be covered.

Prerequisites: Completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics, and finance.

FIN 5562 Fixed Income Analysis Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to provide an overall view of the role of debt markets in the modern economy. The course will cover the characteristics of instruments traded in money and capital markets; determinants of and the relationships between different security prices; and international aspects of financial markets. Topics include: valuing fixed income securities, managing interest rate risk, interest rate theory, the organization of bond markets and the structure and pricing theory underlying the mortgage-related fixed income market.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Bloch School, FIN 5502 (or equivalent).

FIN 5563 Valuation/Mergers and Acquisitions Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to techniques used to value both exchange-traded and private firms. Students should apply these techniques to cases involving mergers and acquisitions, initial public offerings private firm valuation and the valuation of a publicly traded stock.

Prerequisites: completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics and finance.

FIN 5564 Portfolio Management Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to some of the fundamental portfolio management tools used by practicing investment professionals. The student should develop a working knowledge of issues regarding portfolio construction, asset allocation, mean-variance optimization, performance measurement, and client relationship management.

Prerequisites: completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics and finance.

FIN 5565 Alternative Investments Credits: 3

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to investing in alternative assets. The student should develop a working knowledge of various types of alternative investments and how they impact the risk-return profile of a portfolio. The course will cover investments in hedge funds, private equity, real estate, commodities, real assets, energy, and infrastructure.

Prerequisites: completion of introductory coursework in accounting, economics, statistics and finance.

FIN 5566 Financial Plan Development Credits: 3

Personal financial planning differs for each of us for a variety of reasons including age, family, wealth, needs, income, and personalities to name a few. Nonetheless the tax, financial, and risk environments which inspire us to set goals are similar for all of us. Financial planners must take all of these financial and nonfinancial factors into consideration as they devise a plan for their clients. Our objectives, therefore, are to study the personal financial planning process and environment, examine the questions of financial planning, learn financial planning techniques, and develop the ability to prepare integrated financial plans for our clients.

FIN 5567 Payment Systems Credits: 3

Payment systems are central to modern economies, underpinning nearly all economic exchange among consumers, businesses, and government entities. Payment systems in the U.S. have undergone fundamental changes recently. yet, these systems are among the least studied and least understood components of our economy. The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth knowledge of U.S. payment systems and an analytical framework for evaluating and responding to ongoing changes in the payments landscape..

FIN 5568 Organizational Finance Credits: 2

Gives students a thorough introduction to financial management that blends appropriate amounts of relevant theory with practical application.Topics include discounting techniques and applications, evaluating capital expenditures, estimating cost of capital, and valuing stocks and bonds.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Executive MBA program.

FIN 5570 Introduction to Personal Financial Planning Credits: 3

Personal financial planning differs for each of us for a variety of reasons including age, family, wealth, needs, income, and personalities to name a few. Nonetheless the tax, financial, and risk environments which inspire us to set goals are similar for all of us. Financial planners must take all of these financial and nonfinancial factors into consideration as they devise a plan for their clients. Our objectives, therefore, are to study the personal financial planning process and environment, examine the questions of financial planning, learn financial planning techniques, and develop the ability to prepare integrated financial plans for our clients.

FIN 5571 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits Credits: 3

A study of retirement and employee benefits planning, with consideration of Social Security and Medicare planning.

Prerequisites: FIN 5570 or equivalent.

FIN 5572 Income Tax Planning Credits: 3

A study of taxation, with an emphasis on federal, state, and local income taxation, as part of the financial planning process.

FIN 5573 Estate Planning Credits: 3

This course applies the principles of estate planning to real-world situations using the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations and develops strategic decision making skills in the estate, gift, and trust areas.

FIN 5574 Student Investment Fund I Credit: 1.5

In the first semester, students will help actively manage our student investment fund portfolio and will be responsible for analyzing the investment policy statement, generating performance reports and identifying assets to recommend for the portfolio. During this time students will act as industry analysts for specific portions of the portfolio.

Prerequisites: FIN 5553

FIN 5575 Student Investment Fund II Credit: 1.5

In the second semester, students will take a leadership role in managing our student investment fund portfolio and will be responsible for updating the investment policy statement, presenting performance reports and evaluating asset recommendations for the portfolio. In addition, students will actively participate in researching potential new investments.

Prerequisites: FIN 5574

FIN 5580 Organizational Valuation & Financial Modeling I Credits: 2

This course will cover the concept of risk and reward and that to eliminate risk is to eliminate reward. We will delve into how management considers the entity's risk appetite in evaluating strategic alternatives, setting related objectives and developing mechanisms to manage related risks.

Prerequisites: Admission to Executive MBA program.

FIN 5582 Seminar In Finance Credits: 3

Advanced work in financial management, investment analysis, and financial markets and institutions will form the basis for the Seminar. Each topic selected will provide the opportunity for an investigative study on the part of the student. Major problems, hypotheses, and cases, together with the literature addressing the specific topic, will serve as the springboard for classroom activity. Both written and oral reports are required.

Prerequisites: FIN 5532 (or equivalent).

FIN 5587 Special Topics Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possible only offering of new topics.

FIN 5595 Internship Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community.

FIN 5597 Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

FIN 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Health Administration Courses

HLTH-ADM 5551 Leadership and Strategy in Healthcare Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of major leadership and strategic issues in healthcare organizations in the areas of: 1) leadership and organizational dynamics, 2) strategic thinking and planning, 3) population health and health policy, 4) human resources, 5) performance management, and 6) organizational ethics. The course is eligible for inclusion in the Executive MBA program.

Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.

HLTH-ADM 5552 Managing Healthcare Organizations Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of major issues and essential tools in managing healthcare organizations in the areas of: 1) legal and regulatory issues that confront a healthcare organization, 2) healthcare quality and data analysis, 3) patient safety, 4) risk management, 5) process management, 6) healthcare economics, 7) cost and comparative effectiveness, 8) fundamental principles of financial management. The course is eligible for inclusion in the Executive MBA program.

Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.

HLTH-ADM 5571 Financial Management Issues: Health & Human Services Organizations Credits: 3

This course is intended to provide an overview of the financial management problems of health and human services organizations. A broad range of topics is examined: financial statements, ratio analysis, cost accounting, reimbursement and pricing, management of working capital, budgeting and programming, capital financing, and cash management.programming, capital financing, and cash management.

HLTH-ADM 5572 Quality and Safety in Healthcare Credits: 3

Overview of the quality, safety, and process management concepts, approaches, and issues relevant to healthcare delivery settings, including use of analytical techniques used to identify and mitigate contributing factors and process management tools that enable healthcare organizations to achieve their quality and safety goals.

HLTH-ADM 5573 Health and Social Equity Credits: 3

Examines the complex relationship between the social and political environment and health outcomes. All policy is health policy – economic, transportation, natural and built environments, schools. This course examines how social equity shapes health behaviors and how the life odds in different communities expose the historical legacies of past injustices. Only ten percent of health disparities are explained by access to care, although health care and health insurance dominate the public conversation. Draws on guest speakers, books, journal articles, popular press, film and art; as varied as are the social determinants of health, so are media that explore those relationships.

HLTH-ADM 5577 Health Service Administration And The Health Professions Credits: 3

The development of the health professions and occupations is examined as their internal and external relationships influence the structure of health care organizations and the services provided to clients. The focus of the course is on problems that administrators may encounter as they attempt to negotiate services for clients, build professional coalitions, and provide leadership within or outside health care institutions.

HLTH-ADM 5578 The Evaluation And Control Of Health Services Credits: 3

This course focuses on developing evaluative skills associated with controlling the level and costs of health services. Epidemiologic concepts are introduced using clinical and community health examples. The concepts of "at-risk" clients and populations are reviewed, and various attempts to measure risk are assessed. Issues relating to quality assurance are discussed, along with several examples of cost-effectiveness analysis.

HLTH-ADM 5580 Economics of Health and Medicine Credits: 3

A course designed to discuss economic analysis of the development of the medical market, organized medicine and the structure of the health delivery systems. The problems of the medical market will be analyzed, the role of insurance will be investigated and alternative public policies will be studied.

HLTH-ADM 5581 Health Policy in the United States Credits: 3

This course helps students develop an understanding of the determinants of health, major current health policy issues, and health policy making in the United States. The public policy process and its effects on the organization, financing, and delivery of health care are examined in detail. The roles of key players in health policy formulation and the public policy responses to current health policy are also examined.

HLTH-ADM 5586 Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

HLTH-ADM 5587 Special Topics Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possible only offering of new topics.

HLTH-ADM 5595 Internship Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community.

Management Courses

MGT 100 Foundations of Business Credits: 3

Provides an introduction to the functional areas of business (e.g., accounting, systems, finance, marketing, human resources, and entrepreneurship) as well as a number of contemporary business topics, including social responsibility, diversity, ethics, and globalization. Additionally, students will be exposed to various topics that facilitate a successful transition from high school to college. Examples include an overview of University and Bloch School resources, development of effective study habits, time and stress management, selection of a major and career options.

MGT 199 Surfing the Media Matrix: Keeping your Head Above Water in an Ocean of Information. Credits: 3

Students will analyze, interpret and/or reconstruct human events, experiences, actions and interactions through case studies that will help them to understand the principles of value and civic duty in a wide range of settings. Students will be able to identify ethical problems in business, apply critical thinking concepts to better synthesize their understanding of ethical issues and moral reasoning, and be able to articulate implications and consequences that emerge from critical thinking constructs when filtering, analyzing and synthesizing multiple variables.

MGT 301 Effective Business Communication Credits: 3

The instructor introduces students to the strategic nature of business communication. By the end of the course, students should be able to analyze business situations, prepare messages that fulfill the intended purposed of their communication, and meet the needs and expectations of business audiences. Students will develop the tools to deliver effective, professional written and oral communications, and will learn how to use library and electronic business research tools.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200; RooWriter.

MGT 301A Effective Business Communication for Non-Native Speakers Credits: 3

Students will learn the strategic nature of business communication with a focus on building English language skills and understanding U.S. business terminology and culture. By the end of the course, students should be able to analyze business situations, prepare messages that fulfill the intended purposed of their communication, and meet the needs and expectations of business audiences. Students will develop the tools to deliver effective, professional written and oral communications, in addition to cultivating their English language abilities in the business environment.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 225 (or equivalent) or DISC 200; RooWriter.

MGT 306 Legal, Ethical And Regulatory Environment Of Business Credits: 3

The course looks at legal and moral thought, with attention to ethical issues in business. Students are introduced to our common law system; selected areas of law, with attention to the inclusion of cultural and moral values; and an introduction to government regulation of business.

MGT 320 Law Of Commercial Transactions Credits: 3

Study of major areas of law included in the Uniform Commercial Code. Topics may include sales, commercial paper, bank deposits and collections, aspects of property law, documents of title, investment securities, and secured transactions.

Prerequisites: MGT 306.

MGT 330 Understanding the Individual in the Organization Credits: 3

This course explores the micro dynamics of organizations: the individual and his/her relationship to other people, teams, and work groups. Topics will include: individual traits, behaviors, and skills for effective performance; self-assessment and professional development; staffing; motivation; individual and group dynamics; multicultural understanding and diversity; and ethical decision making.

Prerequisites: MGT 301 or MGT 301A or concurrent enrollment (for BBA and BSA students). BLOCH or BIT students only.

MGT 337 Managing Human Capital Credits: 3

Building on prior coursework, this course will provide students with advanced human resource concepts and practices as well as practical experience in how human resources should be managed in successful businesses. Student groups will work with a local organization to diagnose, analyze, and make recommendations regarding effective programs in staffing, developing, rewarding, motivating, and managing its personnel.

Prerequisites: MGT 330.

MGT 355 Organizational Effectiveness and Leadership Credits: 3

Students will study the macro dynamics of organizations: broad knowledge of how organizations work and the various ethical means of impacting outcomes. Topics will include: structure, culture, and politics of organizations; human resources and linkages to organizational culture and success; organization influence and political savvy; managing change and learning in a global context; organizational governance, codes of conduct, and internal controls; the role of business in society; and various professional development issues.

Prerequisites: MGT 330.

MGT 360 Groups and Teams Credits: 3

Teamwork has become increasingly popular in many organizations. Whether formally integrated into the organizational structure, or temporarily created around specific projects, teams can be an important competency of organizations. They are considered an effective performance unit, and expected to efficiently cope with the fast changes and demands of today's business environment. Attaining the full advantages from teamwork requires effective management of team processes and dynamics. This course focuses on issues in team development, internal processes, and members' behavior, as well as management skills needed to effectively lead teams in organizations.

MGT 365 Managing in a Virtual Environment Credits: 3

This course builds on the fundamentals of individual and group behavior to emphasize how organizational design and management practices have been dramatically affected by the proliferation of social media and other internet technologies. Students examine cases and engage in virtual exercises to experience ethical and mindful ways to engage in the virtual environment. Virtual-appropriate variations of interaction, collaboration, conflict management, decision-making, problem-solving, and leadership are introduced. Students also examine geographic and cultural issues potentially encountered in a global virtual organization.

Prerequisites: MGT 330.

MGT 370 International Management Credits: 3

Students receive an introduction to management in an international environment, addressing the management functions and behaviors necessary to develop global vision and management skills at a strategic (macro) and interpersonal (micro) level. Cross-cultural management and competitive strategy are evaluated in the context of global changes.

MGT 470 International Study in Business Credits: 3-6

This course is designed to provide a study-abroad experience for the student. The course involves three components: study of international business through on-campus lectures and discussions; travel to a foreign country for visitations to business firms, government organizations, and cultural sites; and critique sessions of the international learning experience after travel completion.

Prerequisites: special application and selection process.

MGT 471 Strategic Management Credits: 3

The study of business strategy concepts and application using case studies representing "real world" situations. The course stresses the formulation of business strategies to achieve organizational objectives using strategic analysis and models based upon external and internal assessments of the organization's environment.

Prerequisites: ACCTNG 211, DSOM 326 (or concurrent enrollment), FIN 325, MGT 330, and MKT 324.

MGT 490 The Professional Experience: Internship Credits: 3

This "experiential learning" course integrates a business internship opportunity with intensive study related to professional and leadership development. Students will work in a sponsoring organization for 15-20 hours per week and use this experience as a base to build professionalism and leadership. Working with a faculty member and a small cohort of peers in a seminar setting, students will explore ideas such as cultural observation, impression management and managing up, in order to enhance their effectiveness in a business environment and develop professional and leadership skills.

MGT 496 Internship: Management Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community. Internship coursework is evaluated on a credit/no credit basis.

MGT 497 Special Topics: Management Credits: 1-3

Study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

Prerequisites: senior standing.

MGT 5501 International Business Environment Credit: 1.5

The aim of this course is to provide a broad introduction of the international business environment. Students will develop understanding of different economic, cultural political and legal environments affecting international business activities. They will further explore why international trade and government interventions occur among and across countries and how world financial institution have developed historically.

MGT 5502 Leadership in Organizations Credit: 1.5

This course focuses on how organizations work and how leaders can help them work better, Its goal is to provide ideas, tools, and tactics that will help students become more effective leaders. The course is designed to challenge students conceptually through readings, discussions, and developmental assessments, and to challenge at the level of self-awareness and action through teamwork, reflective activities, role plays, case applications, ad "leadership challenges".

MGT 5503 Leadership Residency Credits: 3

This course introduces students to fundamentals of business and effective leadership practice by looking at two different academic areas. Team and Community Building focuses on the fundamentals of collaborative teamwork and basic concepts in the program's leadership curriculum. The other area, Financial Decisions and Societal Goals, overviews approaches to management strategy rooted in financial modeling and analysis.

Prerequisites: Admission to Executive MBA Program.

MGT 5504 Immersion in Legal and Ethical Management of the Enterprise Credit: 1.5

This course will introduce students to some of the common legal and ethical issues that confront entrepreneurial businesses and non-profit organizations. Students will be exposed ti the major differences between U.S. and international approaches regarding these issues. Working individually and in groups, students will be asked to solve problems regarding business formation, employment, intellectual property, contract formation and dispute resolution. Students will demonstrate their understanding by writing about real-world examples involving the legal and ethical concepts covered in the course.

MGT 5506 Contract Negotiation And Dispute Resolution Credits: 3

This course surveys the conceptual framework for negotiating legally binding contracts and examines contemporary institutions and processes for resolving contractual disputes. Particular attention will be given to identifying and appreciating strategies, practices, and specific rules by which binding contractual rights and duties are determined in the United States and in international jurisdictions. Working independently and in teams, students will assimilate the legal rules and negotiation strategies and apply them to common business transactions and disputes.

MGT 5507 Human Capital Management Credit: 1.5

This course seeks to provide managers with knowledge, skills, and resources to effectively manage human capital in organization of all sizes. It presents an overview of the theory, research, and practices used to strategically align HR policies and practices with the organization's overall business goals. The course highlights how HR policies and practices can support business objectives in a diverse, global environment while supporting ethical principles. Within a strategic HRM framework, functional areas of staffing, training and development, performance management, total rewards (compensation and benefits), and managing employment relationships are covered.

MGT 5509 Strategic Management Credit: 1.5

This course covers the classic and contemporary conceptual models in the Strategic Management domain. Students study, compare, and critique the models as they apply them to written, live, and videoed cases. The selected set of cases includes companies focused on both domestic and international markets.

Prerequisites: (FIN 5507, DSOM 5507, MKT 5501) OR admission to the Accelerated Professional MBA program.

MGT 5513 Economic Policy And Managerial Control Credits: 3

Students will study the analysis of the industrial foundations and economic institutions of modern times; the politics of industrial control, including power relationships in economic nationalization and planning and theory of managerial industrialism and business enterprise.

MGT 5516 Leading Teams Credits: 3

This course is designed to enhance the student's understanding of designing, forming, developing, leading, and evaluating high-performing teams in traditional and virtual organizations. In-class projects will facilitate students' assessment and application of their own talents to the arts of member selection, coaching, and trust building to engage team members in productive and ethical group processes to achieve successful outcomes. Cases will be used to diagnose and potentially solve team difficulties considering intra-team, organizational, and extra-organizational factors.

Prerequisites: MGT 5502 OR PUB-ADM 5548 OR admission to Accelerated Professional MBA program.

MGT 5517 Leading Through Influence and Persuasion Credits: 3

This course challenges students to think about power dynamics in organizations and the array of influence approaches leaders develop and use to build support for their ideas and strategies. Using reading, case studies, and self-reflection tolls, this course engages students in critical thinking about business scenarios that require a variety of leader influence strategies beyond traditional "command and control" approaches. Through exploration of concepts such as mapping the terrain, building social capital, and managing across, students develop a toolkit of ethical strategies for enhancing their organizational credibility and influence.

Prerequisites: MGT 5502 or MGT 5507.

MGT 5518 Leadership & Motivation Credits: 3

The course explores leadership as a relationship between leaders and those they are leading that enables people to work together in the service of shared goals. The course focuses on five basic tasks of leadership: (1) diagnosis-understanding what's happening; (2) shaping purpose and values; (3) enlisting and engaging people (including coaching, building high-performance cultures, motivating and inspiring); (4) sustaining momentum; (5) reflection and assessment.

MGT 5519 Conflict Management and Negotiation Strategies Credits: 3

This course explores the nature of successfully managing conflict in organizational settings, as well as the skills needed to be an effective negotiator. In this course, students will learn the difference between functional and dysfunctional conflict, how to stimulate functional conflict, various styles for managing conflict, ways to identify the desired outcomes of conflict, how to prepare for negotiations, various dispute resolution techniques, and the characteristics of effective negotiators. The course uses a variety of tools - readings, case studies, videos, and guest speakers - to engage students in real business scenarios related to managing conflict and negotiation strategies.

Prerequisites: MGT 5502 or MGT 5507.

MGT 5531 Leadership, Strategy and Human Resources Credits: 2

Focuses on the leader as a catalyst in developing high-performance, market -based cultures and as a human resource strategist in marshalling the workforce. Geared to the general manager, the course presents ideas and tools for building, bonding, and linking the workforce to accomplish the organization's mission. Topics include ideas and tools for identifying, recruiting, and retaining talent; developing and coaching subordinates; appraising and rewarding performance; and delegating to balance control and risk.

Prerequisites: Admission to Executive MBA program.

MGT 5533 Leading and Managing Change Credits: 3

This course provides students with analytical skills and insights to more effectively manage and lead change, especially within those organizations characterized by complexity and/or uncertainty. Using a variety of vehicles-including case studies, articles, and speakers-the course engages students in timely, real change scenarios and associated management challenges, such as adaptation in changing markets; turnarounds in troubled businesses; integrative change in acquisitions, and process change in stable businesses.

Prerequisites: MGT 5502 OR MGT 5507.

MGT 5538 Strategic Management Credits: 2

The study of the formulation and evaluation of strategy, including industry analysis, strategic positioning, and the boundaries of the firm. Students address the capacity of executive leadership to create and communicate a clear direction for a company's future.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Executive MBA Program.

MGT 5539 Managing a Complex Workforce Credits: 2

Students learn innovative strategies and tactics to attract, motivate, manage, and retain the critical human capital necessary for organizations to compete in a fast-paced, global economy.

MGT 5540 Business Law and Commercialization Credits: 2

Students learn some of the common legal and ethical issues that confront entrepreneurial businesses and non-profit organizations. The major differences between U.S. and international approaches regarding these issues will be discussed. Working individually and in groups, students will solve problems regarding business formation, employment, intellectual property, contract formation and dispute resolution.

MGT 5541 Strategic Leadership and Decision Making Credits: 2

Students will assess organizational issues and needs through multiple perspectives and develop incisive decisions and actions that reflect complex and changing circumstances and that recognize broad social consequences. Using best-practice frameworks, case applications, and reflective activities, students build a toolkit of innovative approaches to the core work of leadership: setting direction, marshaling resources, and inspiring support.

MGT 5542 Global Immersion Capstone Experience Credits: 2

Students develop cultural intelligence and in-depth knowledge of the relevant economic, political, and social climates of an international region. Drawing on the themes of innovation, social responsibility, and organizational entrepreneurship, students design and complete projects investigating key issues and providing recommendations. Students also organize and plan international travel under the supervision and guidance of a faculty adviser.

MGT 5543 Strategic Management Credits: 2

Stresses the formation of business strategies to achieve organizational objectives using strategic analysis and models based upon external and internal assessment of the organization’s environment. Incorporates a variety of pedagogical approaches including cases and articles, class exercises and discussion, and experiential learning activities, as well as the completion and presentation of a comprehensive case analysis or project capstone.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Full-Time MBA program.

MGT 5545 International Management Credits: 3

Examination of the management of contemporary international business organizations through a study of the political, economic, social and technological factors and their relationship and impact upon the administrative activities and strategies of the international firm.

MGT 5546 Seminar in International Management Credits: 3

This course focuses on the issues that business organizations face in a global economy. The instructor will introduce global strategic decisions via case studies.

Prerequisites: MGT 5545.

MGT 5547 Global Initiatives in Management Credits: 3

Examines the management of contemporary international business organizations in the global economy. The course overviews the interrelationship and impact of political, economic, social, and technological factors, together with the complex challenges of strategy and execution in global companies. It includes a period of international residency.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Executive MBA program

MGT 5552 International Study in Business Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide a study-abroad experience for the student. The course involves three components: study if international business through on-campus lectures and discussions; travel to a foreign country for visitations to business firms, government organizations, and cultural sites; and critique sessions of the international learning experience after travel completion.

Prerequisites: special application and selection process.

MGT 5557 Leadership And Organizations Credits: 2

Focuses on how organizations work and how leaders can set direction, marshal resources, and build support to move initiatives forward. The course provides tools and tactics for assessing organizations needs and constraints through multiple lenses, and assessing one's own leadership strengths and weaknesses for development and alignment with organization needs.

Prerequisites: Admission to Executive MBA Program.

MGT 5566 Attracting, Retaining, and Developing Human Capital Credits: 3

This course presents theoretical frameworks and practical applications for determining optimal person-organization fit and person-job fit within organizations. Emphasis will be placed on integrating recruitment, selection, retention, and training and development strategies and practices with overall business strategies. The importance of strategically planning and implementing staffing and development processes will be addressed as critical contributors to organizational effectiveness and sustainability.

MGT 5567 Total Rewards Management Credits: 3

Total Rewards Management presents both theory and practice for designing effective rewards systems within organizations. The development of base pay and incentives and how they can be linked to performance will be covered. Characteristics of the work environment, such as recognition and development opportunities will also be considered in terms of their contribution to the total reward system.

MGT 5569 Leadership Accountability and the Legal Implications Credits: 2

Highlights the accountability of leaders and the challenges they face in the rapidly changing business environment. The course studies the political, social, ethical, and global environment in which American business organizations operate and the impact on today's leaders. Topics include creating and maintaining affiliate relationships and joint ventures, as well as prohibitions in anti-competitive behavior, protection of intellectual property, operating within a regulated environment, and securities law.

Prerequisites: Admission to Executive MBA Program.

MGT 5570 MBA Capstone-Global Management Consultancy Credits: 3

An integrative global management consulting experience for a real world organization that applies analytical skills in the areas of finance, marketing, information systems, supply chain management, human resources, leadership, innovation, international, and strategy. Course deliverables include written and oral reports for the client organization. The course requires travel to visit client organization's operations.

Prerequisites: MBA students must have completed all required core courses AND be in the last year of their program. MSA, MPA, MSF, MSERE, or MSGE program students may enroll with consent of instructor. Special application and selection process.

MGT 5571 Influence, Persuasion and Change Credits: 2

Presents ideas, strategies, and tools for leading change in complex organizations. This course challenges students to think about the execution of change strategies through assessment or organizational power dynamics and appropriate influence styles for achieving results. Emphasis is placed on analyzing these attributes and skills most critical for building influence, especially in change initiatives, and on defining an ethical approach to leading, influencing, and persuading others.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Executive MBA program.

MGT 5572 MBA Capstone-The Capstone Consulting Project Credits: 3

An integrative management consulting experience for a real world organization that requires application of conceptual models and analytical skills in multiple disciplines including areas such as finance, marketing, information systems, supply chain management, human resources, leadership innovation, international, and strategy. Course deliverables include written and oral reports for the client organization. The course requires interaction with senior managers in the client organization with anticipation of in-person or virtual visits to the firm. Course is to be taken in the student's final semester of the MBA program.

Prerequisites: MSA, MPA, MSF, MSERE, or MSGE program student.

MGT 5574 MBA Capstone-Leading and Managing Change Credits: 3

This course challenges students to apply concepts and models of leadership and strategy to timely, real-world issues and problems across business and functional areas in organizations. Using readings, class discussion, field-based leadership projects, and peer consulting, the course will emphasize the integrating perspective of the general manager and will explore cross-functional vision, decision-making, and execution for leadership effectiveness.

Prerequisites: MBA students must have completed all required core courses AND be in the last year of their program. MSA, MPA, MSF, MSERE, or MSGE program students may enroll with consent of instructor.

MGT 5585 Integrated Business Strategies (Capstone) Credits: 2

Integrates the disciplines of business to help the student develop a comprehensive understanding of business planning and strategy. Students will use cases and simulation to plan and test alternative business strategies in a competitive environment. The course examines the critical factors involved in strategic decision making.

Prerequisites: Admission to the MBA Program.

MGT 5595 Internship Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academics studies via employment with a business/organization in the community.

MGT 5597 Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

MGT 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Management Information Systems Courses

MIS 199 Surfing the Media Matrix: Keeping your Head Above Water in an Ocean of Information Credits: 3

Students will analyze, interpret and/or reconstruct human events, experiences, actions and interactions through case studies that will help them to understand the principles of value and civic duty in a wide range of settings. Students will be able to identify ethical problems in business, apply critical thinking concepts to better synthesize their understanding of ethical issues and moral reasoning, and be able to articulate implications and consequences that emerge from critical thinking constructs when filtering, analyzing and synthesizing multiple variables.

MIS 202 Computer Applications In Management Credits: 3

A comprehensive coverage of computer tools for personal productivity in a management context, including spreadsheets and databases.

Prerequisites: MATH 110 (or equivalent).

MIS 402 Information Management Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the impact of information technologies and systems on the enterprise. Business Intelligence and decision support capabilities are explored as well.

Prerequisites: MIS 202, STAT 235.

MIS 415 Managing the Information Systems Resource Credits: 3

All organizations today have information systems, and managing the related resources (systems personnel, software applications, databases, networks, computing hardware) is a necessary skill for many employees. This course is aimed at developing the non-technical skills that business-school graduates need to make appropriate decisions about the deployment of information systems throughout the firm.

Prerequisites: MIS 202 and six hours of business school courses at the 300-level or above.

MIS 496 Internship: Management Information Systems Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community. Internship coursework is evaluated on a credit/no credit basis.

MIS 497 Special Topics: Management Information Systems Credits: 1-3

Study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

Prerequisites: senior standing.

MIS 5503 Management Information Systems Credit: 1.5

A survey of topics concerning information technology management in the twenty-first century. The course examines information technologies as they influence the structure and processes of organizations, and economies, and as they influence the roles and techniques of management.

MIS 5523 Technology and Analytics Credits: 2

Students study information technology in support of analytical processing in the modern organization. Databases, data warehouses, data mining, data integrity, decision support, and knowledge management applications will be covered.

MIS 5529 Decision Support Systems Credits: 3

Information systems to support decision makers in organizations. This course focuses on influences of cognitive biases and group think on decision makers. Identification of both potential uses of information technology to support decision makers and potential effects of information technology on the decision making processes, and may include a number of computer-oriented assignments.

MIS 5540 Information Technology as a Strategic Tool Credits: 2

This course examines the critical linkage between an organization's business, cultural, and information technology (IT) strategies. In organizations today, information technology has become a key component in accomplishing strategic and operational goals. The course provides concepts and a framework for understanding and enhancing the role IT can play in innovation, change, and continuous organizational learning.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Executive MBA program.

MIS 5552 Data Base Management Credits: 3

Data administration, including theory of relational databases and projects using relational data management packages. The course looks at data modeling and information engineering, entity-relationship modeling, database design, normalization, data dictionaries, distributed databases, database servers, data quality assurance, data integrity, SQL, and may include a number of computer-oriented assignments.

MIS 5554 Systems Analysis, Design And Engineering Credits: 3

This course introduces tools for documenting information system requirements and design and implementation methods; organization of software projects; system specifications, doumentation and diagramming standards;programming languages and methodology; costs and schedule estimation, project management; program verification,and internal control issues.

MIS 5558 Management of Information Technology Credits: 3

Topics to be covered include procurement and management of computer systems, economics of hardware and software, software acquisition, RFQs, RFPs, contract terms and conditions, end-user computing.;capacity planning, contribution of computing to business objectives, control, audit, and security of information technology; legal and ethical perspectives; and international issues.

MIS 5587 Special Topics Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possible only offering of new topics.

MIS 5597 Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

MIS 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Marketing Courses

MKT 324 Marketing Concepts Credits: 3

The course focuses on the processes involved in the marketing of goods and services, including the meaning and importance of marketing terminology, the marketing mix, the marketing concept, consumerism, market segmentation, market and marketing research, and the impacts of different competitive structures on marketing decision making.

MKT 335 Consumer Behavior in Marketing Credits: 3

This course draws upon findings from various disciplines including cognitive psychology, social psychology, sociology, economics, and anthropology to understand and predict buying behavior. Structured around applications in marketing strategy, topical coverage includes motivation, perception, attitude change, choice decisions and the consumption process, as well as post-purchase satisfaction.

Prerequisites: MKT 324.

MKT 348 Market Analysis Credits: 3

Market Analysis equips students with the tools needed to be intelligent users of market data. Topics to be covered include the design of research projects, questionnaire design, sampling, data collection techniques, data analysis, and the presentation of results.

Prerequisites: DSOM 309 (or concurrent enrollment), MKT 324.

MKT 418 Sales and Promotion Strategies Credits: 3

Students receive exposure to the planning, implementation, and evaluation of various revenue-generating and promotional strategies. Topics covered will include the analysis of customers, competitors, and product markets; market segmentation; product positioning; media planning; promotional effectiveness; and client-agency relationships.

Prerequisites: MKT 324.

MKT 420 Sales Management Credits: 3

This course examines the strategic management of the boundary-spanning function of the organization, the sales force. Topics include the selling process, customer relationship management, organizing the sales effort, utilizing sales force automation technology, understanding the salesperson's role, selecting appropriate salespeople, motivating the sales force, conducting training programs, and evaluating the efficacy of individual salespeople and the overall sales function.

Prerequisites: MKT 324

MKT 442 Internet/Direct Marketing Credits: 3

This course examines internet and direct marketing as these topics relate to marketing strategy and the overall marketing plan. Coverage will include topics such as website traffic, customer relationship management (CRM), email marketing, podcasts, blogs, social media, online video, online advertising, online marketing research, and other strategies and tactics for customer acquisition, retention, and add-on selling.

Prerequisites: MKT 324.

MKT 465 Introduction to Retailing and Pricing Credits: 3

This course presents an approach to retail and pricing management. Topics covered in the course include: retail strategy development, understanding the customer, retail information systems, market location selection, merchandise buying and handling, financial operations management, human resource management, operations management, store layout and design, laws ethics, and retail tactics.

Prerequisites: MKT 324

MKT 476 Services Marketing Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to show how the marketing of services differs from the marketing of goods. Additionally, students will learn the relationship between service quality and customer satisfaction, how to understand and assess service expectations, and how to match those expectations with company standards.

Prerequisites: MKT 324.

MKT 480 Marketing Strategy Credits: 3

This senior-year capstone examines various activities within the overall marketing process, and introduces the development and application of an analysis framework. The use of case problems and technology, and exposure of issues related to ethics, allow the student to gain a full understanding of the relationship between marketing and management.

Prerequisites: MKT 335, MKT 348 (or concurrent enrollment).

MKT 496 Internship: Marketing Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community. Internship coursework is evaluated on a credit/no credit basis.

MKT 497 Special Topics: Marketing Credits: 1-3

Study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

Prerequisite: senior standing.

MKT 5501 Marketing Management Credit: 1.5

This course goes beyond the explanation of basic concepts of marketing. The goal is to present a strategic and integrative perspective of marketing in the contemporary digital, global and competitive marketing environment. The emphasis is on the interface between an organization's objectives, capabilities, resources and marketplace needs and opportunities. Examples of major topics to be covered are market-oriented philosophy and corresponding strategy, customer relationship management, branding and brand equity, services marketing, marketing ethics, defensive and offensive marketing strategies, product positioning, distribution and pricing strategies.

MKT 5531 Contemporary Marketing Management Credits: 3

An advanced survey course that emphasizes the core marketing decision variables: product, price, place, and promotion. The emphasis is on the interface between an organization's objectives, capabilities, resources and marketplace needs and opportunities. The subject matter is applicable to firms that produce and/or services, and for-profit and non-profit organizations. Topics include market-oriented problem solving, consumer behavior, marketing ethics, competitive strategy, and product management in domestic and global environments.

MKT 5539 Digital (and Direct) Marketing Credits: 3

This course focuses on front-end and back-end marketing activities using digital as well as direct marketing tools. Major topics include developing an overall digital marketing strategy that includes inline and traditional media, online marketing, affiliate marketing, social media, web analytics and mobile marketing. The course also focuses on developing and maintaining relationships between the firm and customers and between the firm and other suppliers.

Prerequisites: MKT 5501 (or equivalent).

MKT 5543 Marketing Research and Decision Making Credits: 2

Market Research equips students to be intelligent users of market data for the purpose of decision making regarding the market mix and target marketing. The design of research projects, questionnaire design, sampling, data collection techniques, data analysis, and the presentation of results are covered.

MKT 5544 Marketing and Supply Chain Management Credits: 2

Students learn the processes involved in the marketing of goods and services, including the meaning and importance of marketing terminology, the marketing mix, the marketing concept, consumerism, market segmentation, market and marketing research, supply chain management and the impacts of different competitive structures on marketing decision making.

MKT 5555 International Marketing Credits: 3

This course focuses on marketing problems confronting international business managers and the ways they may be analyzed and resolved. The course content includes concepts and techniques useful in international marketing; effects of national differences on marketing practices; organization for international marketing; and strategy formulation for international markets.

Prerequisites: MKT 5501, MGT 5501 (or equivalent).

MKT 5560 Buyer Behavior Credits: 3

A review of behavioral science concepts applicable to an understanding of constituent decision making. Special emphasis is placed on applications of these concepts, by the student, to problems of offer planning, pricing, distribution and promotion.

Prerequisites: MKT 5501 (or equivalent).

MKT 5561 Promotional Strategies In Marketing Credits: 3

Emphasis will be placed on the organization's persuasive communications to customers and prospective customers within a framework of the system of distribution. The central focus concerns how marketing management allocates the promotional mix within the organization's total marketing program. Topics will include the following: 1) promotional mix, 2) campaign strategies, 3) campaign coordination and 4) follow-up control of promotional programs.

Prerequisites: MKT 5501 (or equivalent).

MKT 5562 Marketing Research Credits: 3

This course acquaints the student with the special problems of understanding and applying various measurement techniques to marketing problems. Specific topics to be investigated will depend upon the instructor and the students' areas of interest and specific competencies.

Prerequisites: DSOM 5505, MKT 5501 (or equivalents).

MKT 5565 Marketing Management Credits: 2

Examines the role of marketing in driving profitable revenue growth in companies The focus is placed on tools and approaches to analyzing and understanding customer needs- including the roles of market research and brand equity- and the development of integrated marketing plans to deliver to those needs.

Prerequisites: Admission to Executive MBA Program.

MKT 5570 MBA Capstone-Developing and Maintaining a Customer Centric Organizational Culture Credits: 3

This course begins by providing students a historical view of developing and maintaining a customer centric organizational culture and the impact of same on employees, suppliers, strategic partners and customers. Students are provided practical guidelines and actions and are required to develop an organizational culture plan.

Prerequisites: MSA, MPA, MSF, MSERE, or MSGE program student.

MKT 5575 Advanced Marketing Strategy Credits: 3

This course focuses on advanced marketing skills and practical techniques for defining and meeting the needs of the chosen market. The emphasis is on key drivers of marketing effectiveness, including creating a market-oriented culture, customer-focused information systems, the relationship of various components of marketing, and the response to marketing variables. A variety of pedagogical approaches, including applied projects, may be employed.

Prerequisites: MKT 5501 (or equivalent).

MKT 5587 Special Topics Credits: 3

The study of a contemporary topic of interest. This course is designed to facilitate one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possible only offering of new topics.

MKT 5595 Internship Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community.

MKT 5597 Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

MKT 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

Public Administration Courses

PUB-ADM 410 Research Methods In Public Administration Credits: 3

This introductory course focuses on quantitative empirical research design and statistical analyses in relation to public administration issues and concerns.

Prerequisites: Admission to MPA 5 year program.

PUB-ADM 420 Urban Environmental Policy Credits: 3

Our cities are a first line of action in our efforts to sustain our environment. Many have begun to examine and address the connection between city problems and environmental and climate change, and the disproportionate impacts that they often have on the disadvantaged, yet these initiatives address only the surface of the issue. It is essential for scientists, public administrators, environmentalists, and policy thinkers to pay greater attention to the environmental challenges of our cities. Students examine and assess the challenge of understanding, developing and implementing coherent environmental policy to address such challenges in urban communities.

PUB-ADM 421 Managing for Sustainability in an Urban Environment Credits: 3

Managing for sustainability requires an understanding of theories of organization, environmental management, and sustainability, including how to define and achieve sustainability. Students examine the complexities associated with issues of sustainability and the interrelationship between the global, the local and the personal. This includes consideration of how organizations function, the obstacles to sustainability confronted by sustainability managers, and specific management strategies and tools available to sustainability managers. It also involves the study of change models and their application by managers faced with the challenge of moving an organization from an old operational model to a more sustainable new organizational design.

PUB-ADM 422 Ethics for Nonprofit and Public Administrators Credits: 3

It is essential that organization and community leaders and managers understand the imperatives of ethical practice and ethical leader and manager behavior in nonprofit and governmental settings. Students are prepared to identify and assess the ethical implications of management and policy alternatives, to spot ethical issues before they become crises, and to competently and confidently develop and implement ethical decisions and actions in policy and practice. The ethical dimensions of democracy, political loyalty, pressure politics, interest group issues, pluralism, diversity and multi-cultural challenges, corruption and evil, honesty, the limits of ethical codes, whistle-blowing are included.

PUB-ADM 448 Leadership For Public Service Credits: 3

The two core purposes of this course are for students to learn about effective and ethical leadership, and for students to understand and develop their own capacity for leadership. The course is organized around three general themes: 1) leadership as relations with subordinates, including issues of work motivation; 2) leadership as lateral relations, including organizational politics and conflict management and resolution; and 3) leadership as influence in the organization's environment.

Prerequisites: Admission to MPA 5 year program.

PUB-ADM 455 Non-Profit Leadership Issues Credit: 1

Focusing on leadership issues in nonprofits, this course will explore issues in an intensive seminar format (fifteen class hours). Topics include building and renewing nonprofit boards, and the power of diversity in nonprofit organizations. Recommended for nonprofit management students.

PUB-ADM 455B Non-Profit Leadership Issues: Board-Staff Relations Credit: 1

PUB-ADM 495 Voluntarism, Philanthropy & The Non-Profit Sector In The U.S. Credits: 3

This course provides a survey of the origins, development and contemporary functioning of the private, nonprofit sector in the U.S. The course explores theories and concepts that describe the social, political, legal and economic meaning of voluntarism, philanthropy and the nonprofit sector

PUB-ADM 497 Special Topics In Public Administration Credits: 1-3

Study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

Prerequisites: senior standing.

PUB-ADM 497B Special Topics In Public Administration Credits: 1-3

PUB-ADM 5506 Management in Context Credit: 1.5

This course introduces students to the context of management in business, public, and nonprofit organizations with a specific emphasis on the political, regulatory, social, natural and global environment of management. Students who successfully complete this course gain an understanding of organizations and management that can be utilized in day-to-day work environments, apply theories and concepts to identify organizational issues, problems, and/or ethical considerations, and strengthen their ability to integrate and understand course content in a graduate program within the Bloch School of Management. Working individually and in groups, students will be asked to ex[lain in written and oral formats, and in general and specific terms, what an organization is, how it works, and how it relates to them, to other organizations, and the environment.

PUB-ADM 5510 Research Methods In Public Administration Credits: 3

This introductory course focuses on quantitative empirical research design and statistical analyses in relation to public administration issues and concerns.

PUB-ADM 5523 Public Policy Context for Business Decisions Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide intensive exposure to the forces and personailities in Washington, D.C. that shape America's business policy. EMBA participants learn how to understand and anticipate the impact of public policy on theirbusinesses and how to become more effective participants in the national decision-making process.

Prerequisites:Admission to the Executive MBA program.

PUB-ADM 5525 Financial Accountability And Policy Development Credits: 3

Modern fiscal policy and its administrative implications to planning, budgeting, revenue administration, accounting and appraisal, and the process for assuring accountability in the development, timing, and execution of public programs.

Prerequisites: PUB-ADM 5510 (or equivalent).

PUB-ADM 5526 The Politics Of Administration Credits: 3

This course will introduce the subject of public administration from a political perspective. Special attention will be given to an examination of the administrative branch of government. More specifically, the course will focus on the demands directed to administrators from various sectors of the political system, ways in which administrators respond to those demands, and methods available for the analysis of public policies that help us assess the impacts that flow from administrators' actions.

PUB-ADM 5528 Supervision, Performance Leadership, & Human Resource Management Credits: 3

Focuses on the public service leader as a catalyst in developing and sustaining high-performance, outcome-based cultures and as a human resource strategist in marshaling the workforce. Geared to the work of nonprofit, health care, and government executives and managers, the course addresses strategies for developing, organizing, and mobilizing the workforce to accomplish the organization's mission. Topics include recruiting, engaging and retaining talent, including volunteers; developing and coaching subordinates; appraising and rewarding performance; delegation; and legal dimensions of HR, including anti-discrimination law.

Prerequisites: PUB-ADM 5548.

PUB-ADM 5529 Social Responsibility and Social Entrepreneurship Credits: 2

Using the social enterprise concept, students learn the theory that major companies can move social responsibility from a cost center to a profit center. In this evolving landscape, social entrepreneurs are at the vanguard of creating new business models for neglected markets that corporations can emulate, partner with or acquire to take to scale. As the traditional lines blur among nonprofits, government and business, it is critical that business students understand the opportunities and challenges in this new landscape.

PUB-ADM 5530 Capstone Seminar In Public Administration Credits: 3

This course examines theories of public organizational design, structure and change, including various issues in the administration of public organizations. Questions of professional ethics and management in the public interest are also considered. This is the final course in the MPA core curriculum.

Prerequisites: PUB-ADM 5525, PUB-ADM 5526, PUB-ADM 5544, PUB-ADM 5548 (or equivalents), or concurrent enrollment. Health-services students can substitute HLTH-ADM 5571 for PUB-ADM 5525, and HLTH-ADM 5578 for PUB-ADM 5544.

PUB-ADM 5535 Urban Policy And Administration Credits: 3

An examination of the formulation and administration of policies by urban governments. The course examines (a) the historical and intergovernmental contexts for decision making by urban governments, (b) the governmental forms and political processes employed in making these decisions, and (c) the various urban problems and service delivery issues which require decisions in the contemporary city.

PUB-ADM 5536 Managing Urban Economic Development Credits: 3

This course explores what managers in the public, nonprofit and private sectors need to know about urban economic development. Topics include (a) theories of urban economic development, (b) varying forms of development (e.g., attraction of new industries, central business district development, neighborhood economic development), (c) policy managerial tools for stimulating development, and (d) issues of equity in economic development.

PUB-ADM 5538 Comparative Urban Administration Credits: 3

An analysis of urban administration and planning in different comparative political, economic, and cultural settings. Analytical techniques will be applied to case studies of selected urban administrative processes involving American and other cities.

PUB-ADM 5539 Urban Planning for Public Administrators Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide students in urban administration with a comprehensive overview of the planning process. Course topics include a review of planning and the problems of effective planning implementation.

PUB-ADM 5540 Metropolitan Governance Credits: 3

Relatively few of the problems confronting urban areas are confined to a single city and the most challenging problems usually require regional solutions. This graduate-level course examines the challenges encountered in governing metropolitan regions, the key actors in this process, and the means by which regional problems are identified and addressed. The topics covered in this course include: regional politics and the obstacles to intergovernmental cooperation; the role of councils of government and other regional bodies in metropolitan governance; and the powers, obligations, and roles of municipal and county government in regional systems of governments.

PUB-ADM 5541 Public Policy Development and Analysis Credits: 3

Public, nonprofit, and health organizations must navigate dense systems of complementary and contradictory public policies. These policies assign value to the actions of citizens, and are designed through a process of negotiation and analysis. In this course students will develop the frameworks and analytical methods necessary to understand the process of policy creation as well as the costs and benefits associated with any given policy, including the economic foundations for policy and the impact of policy on management decisions.

PUB-ADM 5544 Program Evaluation Credits: 3

Survey of the tools and procedures for evaluating and analyzing policies and programs in the public sector, including nonprofit and human services organizations. Consideration of such topics as definition of goals, developing measures of effectiveness, evaluation research designs, benefit-cost analysis, and the special problems of rational analysis in a political environment.

Prerequisites: PUB-ADM 5510 (or equivalent).

PUB-ADM 5546 Socially Responsible Management and Ethics Credits: 2

An introduction to the context of management in business, public, and nonprofit organizations with a specific emphasis on the political, regulatory, social, natural and global environment of management. Students gain an understanding of organizations and management that can be used in day-to-day work environments, apply theories and concepts to identify organizational issues, problems, and/or ethical considerations. Working individually and in groups, students explain in written and oral formats, and in general and specific terms, what an organization is, how it works, and how it relates to them, to other organizations, and the environment.

PUB-ADM 5548 Leadership For Public Service Credits: 3

The two core purposes of this course are for students to learn about effective and ethical leadership, and for students to understand and develop their own capacity for leadership. The course is organized around three general themes: 1) leadership as relations with subordinates, including issues of work motivation; 2) leadership as lateral relations, including organizational politics and conflict management and resolution; and 3) leadership as influence in the organization's environment.

PUB-ADM 5551 Strategic Management In Nonprofit Organizations Credits: 3

This is an advanced course in the nonprofit management emphasis. Following review of the legal and economic uniqueness of private, nonprofit organizations, the course helps students develop a strategic framework and apply the key concepts to the management of nonprofit enities. Recommended

Prerequisites: PUB-ADM 495, PUB-ADM 5548 (or equivalent).

PUB-ADM 5552 Community Organizations And Public Policy Credits: 3

This course includes examination of both neighborhood organizations and organizations intended to promote other communities of interest. In relation to neighborhood organizations, topics considered include the varieties of neighborhoods, the role of neighborhood organizations in local politics, the use of neighborhoods in administrative and political decentralization, and federal policy toward neighborhood issues. In relation to other community organizations, topics considered include the basis of such organizations, their roles in public affairs and their effects on policy processes.

PUB-ADM 5553 Legal Framework & Financial Management Of Nonprofit Organizations Credits: 3

Utilizing a comparative approach the course examines the legal basis and tax treatment of private, nonprofit organizations in the U.S. Related topics also considered include concepts of fund and cost accounting, budgeting processes, earned income strategies, employee compensation and benefits practices, laws and regulations affecting lobbying, competition with business and unrelated business income tax.

PUB-ADM 5554 Seminar on Social Entrepreneurship Credits: 3

Seminar on Social Entrepreneurship is a graduate-level special-topics seminar that offers students from across the university the opportunity to engage in an In-depth examination of social entrepreneurship and how it is being understood, developed and practiced in the nonprofit sector. Students will gain a broad understanding of the various conceptions, types and aspects of social entrepreneurship, learn about processes for engaging in entrepreneurial nonprofit organization development, and discuss design and implementation issues with nonprofit leaders who have implemented various forms of social entrepreneurship.

PUB-ADM 5555 Topics In Nonprofit Fundraising Credits: 1-3

In order to flexibly treat the variety of strategies and techniques of charitable fundraising, these courses will usually be offered in variable credit hour segments, covering traditional and emerging fundraising topics. Each semester, two two-credit-hour segments and two one credit-hour segments will be offered. The two credit hour courses - Organizing for Successful Fund Raising" and "Creating and Implementing the Annual Development Plan" - cover the basics of fund raising. The one-credit hour courses allow students to explore several different issues related to fund raising such as direct marketing and planned giving. These courses are recommended for nonprofit management students.

PUB-ADM 5555A Topics In Nonprofit Fund Raising: Organizing For Successful Fund Raising Credits: 1-3

PUB-ADM 5555B Topics In Nonprofit Fund Raising: Creating & Implementing Annual Development Plans Credits: 1-3

PUB-ADM 5555C Topics In Nonprofit Fund Raising: Direct Marketing & Direct Mail In Fundraising Credits: 1-3

PUB-ADM 5555D Topics In Nonprofit Fund Raising: Planned Giving and Major Gift Solicitation Credits: 1-3

PUB-ADM 5555E Topics In Nonprofit Fund Raising: Contemporary Trends/Ethical Issues In Fund Raising Credits: 1-3

PUB-ADM 5555F Topics In Nonprofit Fund Raising: Prospect Research And Proposal Writing Credits: 1-3

PUB-ADM 5555G Topics In Nonprofit Fundraising Credits: 1-3

PUB-ADM 5556 Innovation In Nonprofit Management And Leadership Credits: 3

This course provides an opportunity for students in the nonprofit management specialization to examine "breaking" innovations in nonprofit management and leadership. Intra- and inter-sectoral collaborative strategies and total quality management are illustrative examples. Other topics will be considered as warranted. Recommended preparation: PUB-ADM 5525, PUB-ADM 5548 (or equivalents), and at least six hours of nonprofit management coursework.

PUB-ADM 5558 Ethics for Nonprofit and Public Administrators Credits: 3

It is essential that organization and community leaders and managers understand the imperatives of ethical practice and ethical leader and manager behavior in nonprofit and governmental settings. Students are prepared to identify and assess the ethical implications of management and policy alternatives, to spot ethical issues before they become crises, and to competently and confidently develop and implement ethical decisions and actions in policy and practice. The ethical dimensions of democracy, political loyalty, pressure politics, interest group issues, pluralism, diversity and multi-cultural challenges, corruption and evil, honesty, the limits of ethical codes, whistle-blowing are included.

PUB-ADM 5559 Voluntarism, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector Credits: 3

This course provides a survey of the origins, development and contemporary functioning of the private, nonprofit sector in the U.S. The course explores theories and concepts that describe the social, political, legal and economic meaning of voluntarism, philanthropy and the nonprofit sector.

Cross Listings: PUB-ADM 495.

PUB-ADM 5565 Topics In Urban Administration Credits: 1-3

To flexibly treat the variety of strategies, information, and techniques in urban administration and leadership, these courses will be offered in variable credit hour segments. Each semester, courses will be offered around traditional and emerging topics. An initial "basics" series will be offered on community development organizations, urban economic development and community development strategies.

PUB-ADM 5565A Community Economic Development:The Planning Context Credit: 1

PUB-ADM 5565B Community Economic Development Tools & Techniques Credit: 1

PUB-ADM 5565C Implementing Effective Community Economic Development Credit: 1

PUB-ADM 5565D Topics in Urban Administration Credits: 1-3

To flexibly treat the variety of strategies, information, and techniques in urban administration and leadership, these courses will be offered in variable credit hour segments. Each semester, courses will be offered around traditional and emerging topics. An initial "basics" series will be offered on community development organizations, urban economic development and community development strategies.

PUB-ADM 5566 Urban Environmental Policy Credits: 3

Our cities are a first line of action in our efforts to sustain our environment. Many have begun to examine and address the connection between city problems and environmental and climate change, and the disproportionate impacts that they often have on the disadvantaged, yet these initiatives address only the surface of the issue. It is essential for scientists, public administrators, environmentalists, and policy thinkers to pay greater attention to the environmental challenges of our cities. Students examine and assess the challenge of understanding, developing and implementing coherent environmental policy to address such challenges in urban communities.

PUB-ADM 5567 Managing for Sustainability in an Urban Environment Credits: 3

Managing for sustainability requires an understanding of theories of organization, environmental management, and sustainability, including how to define and achieve sustainability. Students examine the complexities associated with issues of sustainability and the interrelationship between the global, the local and the personal. This includes consideration of how organizations function, the obstacles to sustainability confronted by sustainability managers, and specific management strategies and tools available to sustainability managers. It also involves the study of change models and their application by managers faced with the challenge of moving an organization from an old operational model to a more sustainable new organizational design.

PUB-ADM 5570 Diversity In The Workplace Credits: 3

This course explores the many issues raised by the growing diversity of backgrounds (e.g., race, gender, culture) employees bring to the workplace. The course will examine diversity issues including demographics, relevant legislation, values questions, demands on management, and effects on service delivery to clients. To better illustrate the issues, some class sessions will feature guest lecturers representing a diversity of backgrounds and work settings.

PUB-ADM 5573 Health and Social Equity Credits: 3

Examines the complex relationship between the social and political environment and health outcomes. All policy is health policy – economic, transportation, natural and built environments, schools. This course examines how social equity shapes health behaviors and how the life odds in different communities expose the historical legacies of past injustices. Only ten percent of health disparities are explained by access to care, although health care and health insurance dominate the public conversation. Draws on guest speakers, books, journal articles, popular press, film and art; as varied as are the social determinants of health, so are media that explore those relationships.

Cross Listings: HLTH-ADM 5573.

PUB-ADM 5581 Seminar In Urban Administration Credits: 3

Advanced work on special topics in urban administration. Topics will vary.

Prerequisites: PUB-ADM 5535.

PUB-ADM 5582 Developing and Managing the Nonprofit Social Enterprise Credits: 3

This graduate-level course offers students from across the university the opportunity to learn about and better understand the processes and practices associated with developing and operating a nonprofit social enterprise. Students learn through team-based simulation experience what Is required to create and operate successful social enterprises, and engage in extensive discussions with nonprofit leaders who have implemented some form of social enterprise or other Innovative earned-Income initiative.

PUB-ADM 5585 Seminar In Public Affairs Credits: 3

Advanced work on special topics in public affairs.

PUB-ADM 5585A Seminar In Public Affairs Credits: 3

Advanced work on special topics in public affairs.

PUB-ADM 5585B Seminar In Public Affairs Credits: 3

Advanced work on special topics in public affairs.

PUB-ADM 5585C Seminar In Public Affairs Credits: 3

Advanced work on special topics in public affairs.

PUB-ADM 5587 Special Topics Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possible only offering of new topics.

PUB-ADM 5595 Internship Seminar Credits: 1-3

Combined classroom study and field internship. To be offered only when government agency internships approved by the Public Administration Committee are available.

Prerequisites: 18 credit hours of completed courses.

PUB-ADM 5598A Supervised Research: Nonprofit Management Credits: 1-6

PUB-ADM 5598C Supervised Research: Urban Administration Credits: 1-6

PUB-ADM 5598G Supervised Research: Unspecified Credits: 1-6

PUB-ADM 5599 Thesis Credits: 1-9

PUB-ADM 5610 Inquiry In Public Administration And Affairs Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide Ph.D. students a thorough grounding in strategies of inquiry. Issues considered include competing metatheoretical paradigms and alternative conceptions of explanation in the social and policy sciences, the implications of such alternatives for empirical research, the variety and standards of qualitative and quantitative approaches to theory and research, theory construction, and research ethics. Contemporary problems in public administration and affairs research and theory are emphasized.

PUB-ADM 5620 Literature Of Public Affairs And Administration Credits: 3-6

This course grounds the student in the central ideas of the public affairs and administration literature and in the prominent themes of the discipline. The course is offered in two versions: A, in which the political science approach to public affairs and administration is emphasized; and B, in which the organizational theory and behavior approaches to public affairs and administration are emphasized. Ph.D. students whose coordinating discipline is public affairs and administration are ordinarily expected to complete both versions.

Prerequisites: PUB-ADM 5525, PUB-ADM 5526, and PUB-ADM 5544 (for PUB-ADM 5620A); PUB-ADM 5530, PUB-ADM 5548 (for PUB-ADM 5620B).

PUB-ADM 5620A Literature Of Public Affairs And Administration: Political Science Credits: 3-6

PUB-ADM 5620B Literature Of Public Affairs And Administration:Organizational Theory & Behavior Credits: 3-6

PUB-ADM 5699 Dissertation And Research In Public Affairs And Administration Credits: 1-12

Dissertation research and writing in the Public Affairs and Administration discipline.

PUB-ADM 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

PUB-ADM 598E Supervised Research: International Management Credits: 1-6

Real Estate Courses

RL-EST 321 Real Estate Principles Credits: 3

The student will be introduced to the very basics of real estate from the terminology, real estate's role in the economy, legal foundations, government controls, appraisal processes, valuation processes, brokering and closing transactions, time value of money, basic management issues and lease clauses, and basic standard form purchase contracts.

RL-EST 322 Real Estate Principles II Credits: 3

This practical course is designed to build upon the terminology and professional obligations learned in Principles I. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the basic concepts of real estate and provide initial exposure to the real estate profession. Completion of the course will provide students with a better understanding of the complexity and breadth of the real estate industry.

Prerequisites: RL-EST 321 or ENT 321.

RL-EST 421 Real Estate Finance Fundamentals Credits: 3

This course will provide a fundamental understanding of basic financial concepts of real estate including compounding and discounting, construction of amortization tables and after-tax yield analysis for a simple real estate investment. It also touches on the basics of title insurance, ownership issues, fixed rate verses variable rate mortgages in residential real estate, understanding housing bubbles, and trends in valuation of residential real estate. In addition, the student will complete mathematical comparisons of leasing versus owning a home.

Prerequisites: FIN 325.

RL-EST 425 Principles of Real Estate Property Management Credits: 3

Explores the complexities of managing apartments, condominiums, office buildings, industrial property, and shopping centers. This course covers rental markets, development of rental schedules, leasing techniques and negotiations, repairs and maintenance, tenant relations, merchandising, selection and training of personnel, accounting and owner relations.

RL-EST 496 Internship: Real Estate Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community. Internship coursework is evaluated on a credit/no credit basis.

RL-EST 497 Special Topics: Real Estate Credits: 1-3

Study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

Prerequisites: senior standing.

RL-EST 5555 Real Estate Forum Credit: 1

Real estate is an interdisciplinary field of study which involves a number of related professions. In this course students will be exposed to the full array of disciplines by listening to, and interacting with, a series of industry leaders. These leaders will be drawn from such fields as architecture, brokerage, construction, development, consulting/appraisal, finance, investment, law and global fields. The course will be open to students from across campus to help sensitize others to the breadth of the discipline and the nature of inquiry and career paths it entails. Students will learn the entrepreneurial spirit that it takes to succeed.

RL-EST 5556 Entrepreneurial Real Estate Process Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course adopts an entrepreneurial approach to the real estate process spanning concept generation, planning, research, acquisition, design, construction, finance, and investment. The course is open to students from various units across campus. Students will engage in experiential learning to sensitize them to the breadth of inquiry, critical thinking and analysis involved in contemporary real estate. Instruction focuses on creation of optimal spatial solutions for targeted users on targeted sites that are economically viable, sustainable and environmentally responsible. The course emphasizes the importance of focusing on value creation, control and capture across the full life cycle of real estate.

RL-EST 5557 Urban Planning Contexts for Real Estate Decisions Credits: 3

Overview of forces and trends affecting community growth and change history, ecology, economics, demography, design and development pertaining to human settlement patterns and their interrelationship in the urbanization process, especially at the national, regional, townscape and neighborhood level.

RL-EST 5558 Capital Markets Credits: 3

The course examines the influence of capital markets on real estate by covering the structure and operation of the private and public, debt and equity real estate capital markets, as well as derivative markets that involve real estate. A thorough range of topics in equity real estate investment are examined including: private equity markets, private equity deal structuring, public and private real estate investment trusts (REITs), measuring risk and return; structuring optimal portfolios, portfolio valuation issues, valuing publicity traded real estate securities, performance evaluation and attribution, and real estate risk management techniques. This course also covers a variety of topics in commercial real estate debt markets including: the structure of the US mortgage finance system, and the valuation of mortgages and commercial mortgage backed securities.

RL-EST 5559 Corporate Real Estate Credits: 3

This course concentrates on the decisions any business faces when it comes to finding a location/s in which to operate their business/s. It deals with financial and subjective decision making models to chose a location that will create the lease occupancy cost to the business owner as well as maximizing the operation of their business. Various modeling techniques will include Lease vs Lease Analysis; Lease vs Own Analysis, Location Factor Analysis standard lease provisions, construction management topics and public-private incentives and the impact on a corporate financial statement under the current regulations of FASB 13.

RL-EST 5571 Real Estate Finance Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the full spectrum of real estate finance and investment analysis. It helps students quantify the financial implications of various real estate decisions for individual properties as well as more strategic decision-making applied to real estate portfolios. Using a combination of experiential and incremental learning students develop the foundation skills necessary to support more advanced concepts and financial theory. The course explores time value of money, law, leverage, underwriting, discounted cash flow, investment analysis, and capital markets. Students also develop advanced modeling skills and learn how to apply state-of-the art financial packages to support decisions.

Prerequisites: RL-EST 5556.

RL-EST 5572 Global Real Estate Credits: 3

Globalization is one of the key forces that have forced the real estate industry to recognize that while real estate may be located in a specific market, it is subject to a number of national and global forces. In this course, students will learn how globalization of the business, economic and capital markets affects real estate and how global capital flows affect the value of individual investments. Students will also learn how globalization has affected the key players –developers, investors, space users and lenders— and the impact on how they approach real estate on a country-specific and global basis.

Prerequisites: RL-EST 5571.

RL-EST 5573 Real Estate Feasibility and Market Analysis Credits: 3

This course helps students develop entrepreneurial, fact-based approaches to problem-solving and decision support. It incorporates experiential learning to help students deploy quantitative and qualitative approaches that incorporate the perspectives of space users, space producers, and market facilitators. Students learn how to address the goals and objectives of a particular client, while also considering the externalities and impacts such decisions have on the built environment. Students will integrate critical thinking with spatial and financial analytical methods and state-of-the-art tools to quantify market demand and to translate that demand to a spatial solution that is marketable and financially feasible.

Prerequisites: RL-EST 5556.

Co-requisites: ENT 5576.

RL-EST 5574 Real Estate Construction and Development Credits: 3

This course explores principles and techniques of construction project management and real estate development. Adopting a holistic perspective it places the production of real estate in a broader context of product life cycles drawing on systems analysis, planning, programming, budgeting and staffing, controlling major projects. Students apply experiential learning and assume the role of a developer who marshals the resources needed to produce real estate. It explores new projects and renovation of existing space with emphasis on customizing products to fit user needs. The course sensitizes students with emphasis on creating sustainable products that are socially responsible and economically viable.

Prerequisites: RL-EST 5556.

RL-EST 5575 Real Estate Taxation Credits: 3

This course concentrates on factors affecting real estate investments; legal forms of ownership, depreciation, tax basis, tax impacts on exchanges, syndications, real estate securities, and other federal laws affecting real estate.

RL-EST 5576 Real Estate Property and Portfolio Management Credits: 3

This course explores the complexities and integration of property and portfolio management which are critical to the creation, control and capture of real estate value. Students learn how to approach real estate in a more holistic manner by integrating management functions that range from individual property types to portfolios of properties. Students learn how to incorporate marketplace factors in their decisions and apply modern portfolio theory and other tools to construct and manage properties and portfolios in a socially responsible manner. Using experiential methods students learn to apply critical thinking to solve complex property and portfolio management problems.

Prerequisites: RL-EST 5571.

RL-EST 5577 Real Estate Valuation Credits: 3

This course provides students with an understanding of real estate appraisal garnered through a combination of lectures, projects and discussions. Students explore valuation theory, behavioral processes, and the unique nature of the inefficient real estate market. Through hands on exercises that constitute the experiential learning students apply best practices embedded in the three approaches to value that underpin real estate appraisal: cost, income and sales comparisons. Students also analyze the impact of macroeconomic conditions, supply/demand conditions, capital flows, and investor behavior. Students develop proprietary valuation models and apply appropriate quantitative tools and software for predicting most probable prices.

Prerequisites: RL-EST 5556.

RL-EST 5578 Legal Context of Real Estate Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course acquaints business and law school students with legal issues in development, ownership and operation of commercial real estate. It also explores the roles of various professionals in real estate transactions. Students will learn legal concepts and terminology, and acquire familiarity with key issues and documents relating to real estate decisions and entrepreneurship, including leasing, insurance, negotiations, construction and architect’s contracts, transactions, regulation, financing and bankruptcy. Students learn how to apply risk management to design and construction contracts, insurance, bonding and indemnification, as well choice of business entity, income tax planning and negotiation of joint ventures.

RL-EST 5579 Real Estate Capstone Credits: 3

This course is a group simulation of an actual case in real estate that enables students to utilize all of their previous course experience on a real-world case in real estate. It is intended that this case study will enable students to appreciate the multiple facets of real estate, and the need to call upon the tools, concepts and skills taught in the analysis of the highest and best use of the subject property.

RL-EST 5587 Special Topics Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate one of two purposes: an initial offering of a new course (prior to formal approval) or an initial and possible only offering of new topics.

RL-EST 5595 Internship Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for students to integrate their academic studies via employment with a business/organization in the community.

RL-EST 5597 Real Estate: Independent Study Credits: 1-6

Independent study and research in areas of special interest under individual faculty direction.

RL-EST 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1