Courses

HISTORY 5500B Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500BB Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500C Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500CL Cluster Course:Nordic Culture Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500CP Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500CZ Special Studies History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500D Special Topics in History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500E Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500G Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500GB Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500GR Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500H Special Topics In History For Graduate Students Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500JCA Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500LA Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500P Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500R Special Topics in History for Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 400.

HISTORY 5500RC Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500RD Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500RJ Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500SS Special Topics In History For Graduate Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5500W Special Topics in History for Graduate Students Credits: 3

HISTORY 5500Z Special Studies: Labor In Industrial America Credits: 3

This course examines the history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1877 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement, the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers' relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

HISTORY 5501A Religion in America Credits: 3

An in-depth examination of selected aspects of the history of religions in America from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis will be given to methodological issues in the study of American religious history.

HISTORY 5502 America,1000-1763: The Formative Era Credits: 3

Early American history emcompasses the formative era of many institutions and attitudes which still persist in present-day America. A study of how these patterns and policies emerged will enlighten us as to our current ways our society seeks to adapt to change.

HISTORY 5503 America, 1763-1783: The Revolutionary Heritage Credits: 3

The American Revolution created American history by creating a new nation. What the American Revolution was depends to a large extent upon what Americans think they are or ought to be. The goals of this course, therefore, are twofold: (1) to probe the nature, causes and consequences of the American Revolution; (2) to assess the intentions and behavior of both the Framers of the Constitution in 1763-1783 and the inheritors of modern America.

HISTORY 5504 America, 1783-1828: The National Experience Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 304.

HISTORY 5505 America, 1828-1852: The Jacksonian Period Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 305.

HISTORY 5506 America, 1850-1877: Civil War and Reconstruction Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 306.

HISTORY 5506A History of Christianity to Middle Ages Credits: 3

This course examines the historical and theological development of Christianity from its origins to the High Middle Ages. The main themes follow the mechanisms and conditions shaping Christianity's expansion into a major social, institutional, and intellectual force with a focus on pattern of crisis and reform. This course is based on the study of primary sources (both texts and objects) and modern scholarship.

HISTORY 5507 America 1877-1917: Development of Industrial America Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 307.

HISTORY 5507A The History of Christianity from the Middle Ages to the Present Credits: 3

This course examines the historical and theological development of Christianity from the High Middle Ages to the present. The main themes follow the mechanisms and conditions shaping Christianity's expansion into a major social, institutional and intellectual force with a focus on patterns of crisis and reform. This course is based on the study of primary sources ( both texts and objects) and modern scholarship.

HISTORY 5508A America 1914-1945: The Era of the World Wars Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 308B.

HISTORY 5508B America 1945-Present: Our Times Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 308B.

HISTORY 5511 Medieval Civilization I Credits: 3

Medieval Civilization I

HISTORY 5512 Medieval Civilization II Credits: 3

Medieval Civilization II

HISTORY 5512A Medieval Women & Children Credits: 3

This course explores the roles of women in the social, economic, political, and cultural environments of medieval and early modern Europe. We examine the lives of women in all areas of life, from the ordinary to the extraordinary, in urban and rural environments, from the centers of religious and political power to the margins of society. Focus will be on the world of work for urban and peasant women and on the social and legal institutions of marriage, kinship, and the family. The course makes extensive use of primary source by and about women during this period.

HISTORY 5513 Renaissance Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 413.

HISTORY 5514 Reformation Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 414.

HISTORY 5515B 17Th And 18Th Century European History Credits: 3

This course is designed to present the upper-division undergraduate with a firm grasp of the major intellectual, cultural, political and economic development of 17th and 18th century Europe. It considers the bitter Thirty Years War in Century Europe, the rise of the Netherlands, the fall of Italy and Spain, the rise of constitutional and absolutist styles of government, the scientific revolution, the colonization by Europeans of the Pacific and Indian Ocean Basins, Enlightenment political philosophy, the Agricultural Revolution, and the French Revolution. Also offered for undergraduates as 415B. Graduate students will be held to a higher standard in terms of additional, in-depth historiographic research, writing, and discussion.

HISTORY 5516 The French Revolution and Napoleon Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 416R.

HISTORY 5517 19th Century European History Credits: 3

This upper-division course will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture in 19th century Europe, paying particular attention to the rise of modern ideologies and identities, world hegemony, and the social technologies of dehumanization that foreshadowed the unprecedented inhumanities of the 20th century. Graduates will be held to a higher standard in terms of additional, in-depth historiographic research, writing, and discussion.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 417R.

HISTORY 5518 20th Century European History Credits: 3

This upper-division course traces the history of Europe in the 20th century. It will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture, paying particular attention to the issues of modernity and postmodernity, imperialism and decolonization, dehumanization and genocide as well as the role of ordinary people in these systems of mass destruction. Graduate students will be held to a higher standard in terms of additional, in-depth historiographic research, writing, and discussion.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 418R.

HISTORY 5519 Contemporary European History: 1950-2000 Credits: 3

This upper-division course traces the history of Europe in the period of living memory. It will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics social relations and culture, paying particular attention to the rise of globalization and the condition of postmodernity, decolonization and neo-colonization, European unification and everyday life. Graduate students will be held to a higher standard in terms of additional, in-depth historiographic research, writing, and discussion.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 419R.

HISTORY 5521 Oral History Credits: 3

This course focuses on the methods, theories, ethics, practices, and applications of tools in documenting and recovering the experiences of people hidden from the “traditional records.” Through lectures, readings, discussions, and fieldwork, students will learn the various steps in developing a robust oral history project. Students will go out into the community to capture the histories of communities in Kansas City.

HISTORY 5525R European Criminal Justice History, 500-1900 Credits: 3

This course will survey European crime, criminal procedure, policing and punishment between 500 and 1900. Particular attention will be given to changing methods of proof (oaths, ordeals, juries); changing type of criminal activity (banditry, vagrancy, witchcraft, professional theft) and changing penal strategies (the stocks, breaking on the wheel, the workhouse, the prison, the penitentiary). English experiences are emphasized.

HISTORY 5526 Modern Latin America Credits: 3

This course studies social, political, economic and cultural trends in Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Discussion topics include nation building after Independence with an emphasis on gender and race in the creation of national identities and new forms of social stratification; integration of national economies into the world economic system; the expansion of political participation and citizenship; immigration (national and transnational) and the tensions caused by the forces of modernization and tradition. Although the purpose of the course is to provide a general background for a large and diverse region (more than 20 countries), case studies from Argentina, Mexico and Brazil will illustrate the above-mentioned themes and will provide the basis for a comparative regional perspective.

HISTORY 5526R The Scientific Revolution 1500-1700 Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 426R.

HISTORY 5527 The Darwinian Revolution, 1650-1900 Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 427R.

HISTORY 5528A History Of The Body Credits: 3

This advanced course will explore the new field of the history of the body, with particular attention to sexuality and gender. Topics will include the history of sexualities, the body and society, body disciplines, medical practices and representations of illness, beauty, and fashion, and the relationship between sexualities and nationalisms.

HISTORY 5528B Women & Medicine:Patients & Practitioners From Antiquity-Present Credits: 3

This course explores, in a selective fashion, the role of women in Western Medicine both as health care providers and patients. The subject of the history of medicine is too broad to be covered comprehensively in a semester, and so we will focus on diseases or physical conditions which were believed to be limited to women-childbirth, certain mental health conditions, reproductive health, breast cancer-as well as the increasing marginalization of women within the profession of health care providers to those branches concerned primarily with "women's problems.

HISTORY 5531 Medieval England, 1066 to 1485 Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 431R.

HISTORY 5532 Tudor-England, 1485-1688 Credits: 3

This course covers the history of England from the accession of Henry VII in 1485 to the crowning of William and Mary in the Glorious Revolution. Its main emphasis is the Tudor dynasty 1485-1603 with special reference to the transformation of England into a modern state, Re-Reformation, the role of Parliament, etc. The course concludes with the major characteristics of the early Stuart period.

HISTORY 5533 History of Britain 1603-1832 Credits: 3

This course analyzes the rise and fall of the Stuart dynasty and the effects of civil war, rebellion, and religious turmoil on the peoples of Britain. The domination of politics and culture by the aristocracy in the eighteenth century is examined. The rise of the Navy due to constant warfare and the exploration of the Pacific are discussed. The monarchy of George III, the loss of the American colonies, and the wars with Napoleon are examined. Finally, the Agricultural and early Industrial Revolutions are considered through an analysis of the social changes they brought in Britain and the Empire

HISTORY 5534 History of Technology Credits: 3

The course examines technology as it shapes and is shaped by human society. Students will consider technology as a product of historically-specific and sometimes overlapping contexts shaped by culture, economics, natural environments, and social processes.

HISTORY 5536 Modern German History: 1890-1990 Credits: 3

This course traces history of Central Europe from the fall of Bismarck to the reunification of Germany one century later. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society, elites and 'ordinary' Germans, in the various German-speaking regimes that existed over the course of this era: two empires, two interwar republics, two fascist dictatorships, and three post-fascist republics. All assigned readings will be in English; a background knowledge of European history is recommended.

HISTORY 5537 Nazi Germany Credits: 3

Nazi Germany

HISTORY 5544 Islam & the Arabs: The Formative Period Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 444R.

HISTORY 5545 The Ottoman Empire in the Middle East to WWI Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 445.

HISTORY 5546 The Middle East from World War I to the Present Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 446R.

HISTORY 5548 Missouri/Kansas Border Wars Credits: 3

This course explores the history of the Civil War on the Missouri/Kansas border, where residents first shed blood over the issue slavery. An exploration of this most uncivil of wars provides insight into the ways in which societies can be fragmented by ideology and ultimately rebuilt upon different lines.

Prerequisites: undergraduate degree.

HISTORY 5549 Civil War in Memory and Film Credits: 3

This course explores how the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction has been portrayed in film, literature, and art, and if the popular memory of the war accurately reflects the history. We also will discuss how the understanding of this pivotal event in American History has changed over time and how cultural artifacts often say more about the time in which they were produced than the actual history of the Civil War.

HISTORY 5552 Latin American History through the Movies Credits: 3

This course explores the national cinemas and film industries of various regions in Latin America. Students will analyze films both as artistic endeavors and as sociological documents that provie a window into the socio-historical context of the nation in question. This course will also examine the history of Latin American cinema from the beginnngs of sound to present.

HISTORY 5554 Women in Modern America Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 354R.

HISTORY 5556 Rise of the City in the U.S. Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 356.

HISTORY 5556R Kansas City: History of a Regional Metropolis Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 356R.

HISTORY 5557 The American West Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 357.

HISTORY 5558 Black Civil Rights in the 20th and 21st Centuries Credits: 3

This course examines the fight for black civil rights in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries, focusing on the Jim Crow period, the fight to end segregation, and the enduring problem of race in the United States.

HISTORY 5558R History of the American South Credits: 3

History of the American South

HISTORY 5559 World War II Film and Propaganda Credits: 3

This course examines film and propaganda, including posters, political cartoons, speeches, and other media, created in prewar or wartime conditions by both the Allies and Axis powers from 1933 to 1945 as it affected World War II.

HISTORY 5561R American Foreign Relations Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 361.

HISTORY 5562J Japanese Civilization Credits: 3

A survey of Japanese civilization and cultural history from the prehistorical period to the present. Emphasis on the interplay between religion, the arts, politics, and social structure.

HISTORY 5563R Military History of the U.S. Credits: 3

Military History of the U.S.

HISTORY 5566R American Economic History Since 1865 Credits: 3

The course deals with the emergence of Industrial America since 1865. It will cover the rise to dominance of the large modern corporation, with the problem of economic and social instability and stability, with the rise of trade associations, cartels, and government regulation in an unstable economy, and with the evolution of American economic policy and national economic planning.

HISTORY 5566RR American Labor History Credits: 3

This course examines the history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1750 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement, the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers' relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

HISTORY 5569 Women and Work in Early America Credits: 3

This course examines the ways in which gender, race, region, and class have shaped the historical experiences of American women. Students will trace women’s lives from pre-European contact to 1877 through an examination of a wide variety of social, cultural, economic, and political forces and factors.

HISTORY 5570 Introduction to Material Culture Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 370.

HISTORY 5570R Ancient Egypt Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 470.

HISTORY 5571 American History Through Film Credits: 3

This course will move through the twentieth century and highlight major themes and developments that reveal the contours of American history as depicted in film. Students will examine the ways in which filmmakers have presented history, paying particular attention to the presentation of political, cultural, and social conflicts.

HISTORY 5571R Ancient Greece Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 471.

HISTORY 5572R Ancient Rome Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 472.

HISTORY 5574 Late Antiquity: The Transformation of the Mediterranean World (200-600 AD) Credits: 3

The decline of the Roman Empire and the barbarian invasions transformed the Mediterranean and European worlds, forming the foundation of Europe and the Islamic world. Students will investigate the multicultural society of Late Antiquity and become familiar with the primary sources for the period.

HISTORY 5575 Ancient Israel Credits: 3

Judaism has had a tremendous impact on our civilization and yet most Americans are only dimly aware of its origins and development. This course will trace the roots of the Jewish religion in its historical context from its beginning through the formation of rabbinic culture. The rise of Christianity will be examined in its original Judaic context, and recent discoveries, particularly those pertaining to the Dead Sea Scrolls, will be interpreted.

HISTORY 5575R The History of Ancient Israel Credits: 3

The History of Ancient Israel

HISTORY 5576R Medieval Jewish History Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 476.

HISTORY 5577R Modern Jewish History Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 477.

HISTORY 5578R The Holocaust and the State of Israel Credits: 3

The Holocaust and the State of Israel

HISTORY 5579 Public History: Theory and Method Credits: 3

This course explores the theoretical and methodological challenges that surround the public preservation and presentation of history in spaces like museums and historical societies. Students will learn the skills professionals use to communicate historical scholarship to wider audiences and will grapple with the issues around expanding history's stakeholders.

HISTORY 5580 The History Of The American South I Credits: 3

A study of the political, intellectual, cultural, economic, and social development of the American South up to and including the Civil War. Special topics discussed will e the plantation system , slavery, abolition, secession, the Confederacy and the interaction of the region with the nation.

HISTORY 5581 Research Methodologies Credits: 3

An introduction to a variety of research tools and techniques including such topics as evidence, critical method, verification, bibliography, book review, computers, statistics, and archival methods.

HISTORY 5581GR How To - History I Credits: 3

This foundational course in the doing of history will use the "great books" of historical scholarship to introduce graduate students to historical questions, methods, theories, and rhetorical strategies. The goal of the course is for the student to learn how to engage in historical criticism and formulate historical questions for themselves. This required course must be taken in the first year of graduate study in history.

HISTORY 5582 Colloquium In American History I Credits: 3

These courses are designed to acquaint the graduate student with the writings and theories of major American historians. Faculty lectures are combined with student bibliographical essays and the reading of important historical works in order to prepare the student for the final examination taken upon completion of M.A. course work. Books read in the course compose a large proportion of the departmental reading list.

HISTORY 5582GR How To - History II Credits: 3

This foundational course in the doing of history will introduce graduate students to professional obligations and research methodologies of academic historians. Pragmatic in focus, it will prepare students for all stages of research and teaching through all aspects of an historical career from graduate school to full professorship or other directions. This required course must be taken in the first year of graduate study in history and it fulfills the SGS recommendation for ethical instruction.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 5581GR.

HISTORY 5583 Colloquium In American History II Credits: 3

These courses are designed to acquaint the graduate student with the writings and theories of major American historians. Faculty lectures are combined with student bibliographical essays and the reading of important historical works in order prepare the student for the final examination taken upon completion of M.A. course work. Books read in the course compose a large proportion of the departmental reading list.

HISTORY 5583GR Medieval Methods & Paleography Credits: 3

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in these fields. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course examines the historical and cultural settings for texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textual transmission in the medieval and early modern world. In addition to gaining familiarity with many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal, and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for archival work in various European nations.

HISTORY 5584R Colloquium In European History I Credits: 3

The European History Colloquium I will examine some of the crucial problems or watersheds in European history from antiquity through the Reformation. Course requirements include weekly discussions on specific topics and a research paper or project due by the end of the semester.

HISTORY 5585 Colloquium In European History II Credits: 3

The European History Colloquium II will examine some of the crucial problems or watersheds in European history from the Reformation through the 20th century. The course seeks to provide an in-depth study of specific topics and of the associated bibliography.

HISTORY 5585GR Colloquium in U.S. History Credits: 3

Students read broadly in the historiography of a particular historical problem, place, period, or specialization in U.S. History in order to master the relevant literature and hone their skills of historical criticism.

Co-requisites: HISTORY 5581GR.

HISTORY 5586GR Colloquium in World History Credits: 3

Students read broadly in the historiography of a particular historical problem, place, period, or specialization in world history in order to master the relevant literature and hone their skills of historical criticism.

Co-requisites: HISTORY 5581GR.

HISTORY 5587R Research Seminar Credits: 3

Students in this course will produce a major research paper under the direction of the instructor: a self-contained thesis chapter, an article for publication or the equivalent.

HISTORY 5587RA Research Seminar Credits: 3

HISTORY 5587RB Research Seminar Credits: 3

HISTORY 5590 History Of The American South II Credits: 3

A study of the political, intellectual, cultural, economic, and social development of the American South since the Civil War. Topics discussed will be the molding of a "New South,: twentieth century internal developments and the interaction of the region with the nation.

HISTORY 5591 Archival Methods Credits: 3

HISTORY 5592 Public History Internship Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 5593 Museum Studies Credits: 3

This course is designed to acquaint students with specific careers in museums and historical agencies; to introduce students to the wide range of operating issues facing those working in the museum profession on a day-to-day basis; and to familiarize students with the organizations, reference works and resources available to develop the skills and training required for those who choose to make this their profession.

HISTORY 5594 Public History and New Media Credits: 3

This course provides students with an understanding of how new media can advance the work of cultural heritage. While contributing to an ongoing digital project, the course will consider how historians utilize digital technology to analyze primary sources as well as how museums use social media to reach broader audiences.

HISTORY 5597 Non-Thesis Research/Reading Credits: 1-6

Individual direction of student reading or research by selected, consenting faculty. This course can be taken only when faculty supervision is unavailable in colloquia or seminars.

HISTORY 5599R Thesis Credits: 1-6

A contribution to knowledge based upon extensive research and reflective of careful analysis. Before writing a thesis, the student must clear the topic and research design with the Supervisory committee.

HISTORY 5680 Doctoral Colloquium Credits: 3

This course will examine the writings and theories of major historians in a particular field of history. The authors, works and intellectual currents which form the basis of the colloquium will vary from semester to semester, depending upon the professor's expertise and design for the course.

HISTORY 5687 Doctoral Research Seminar Credits: 3

Students in this course will produce a major research paper under the direction of the instructor. This shall consist of a self-contained chapter of the dissertation or a work of publishable quality. May be repeated for credit.

HISTORY 5687RB Doctoral Research Seminar Credits: 3

Students in this course will produce a major research paper under the direction of the instructor. This shall consist of a self-contained chapter of the dissertation or a work of publishable quality. May be repeated for credit.

HISTORY 5697 Doctoral-Level Independent Reading Credits: 1-6

Individual reading under the supervision of members of the History Doctoral Faculty in preparation for the Comprehensive Examination for the Ph.D.

HISTORY 5699R Dissertation Credits: 1-15

Course credits in dissertation.

HISTORY 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1

HISTORY 5990 Capstone Credits: 1-6