Courses

ENGLISH 5500 Graduate Study In English Credits: 3

An introduction to methods of research and scholarship related to English studies. The course uses a wide spectrum of print and digital materials, library facilities (including archives and Special Collections), databases, and other resources to explore English studies as an academic discipline and profession.

ENGLISH 5500P Special Topics Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5501 Magazine Editing Credits: 3

A course combining academic study of editorial management, publishing operations, and language skills, with "hands on" experience in article evaluation, editing, magazine production, and legal matters such as copy right and libel. Class work concentrates on authentic and effective language use, with attention given to copy editing, grammar, typography, printing processes, financing and distribution for commercial and small-press publications.

ENGLISH 5502 Magazine Nonfiction Credits: 3

This course emphasizes the origination and execution of nonfiction magazine articles for a variety of publications. Special attention is given to successful queries and the various writing techniques required for different kinds or articles. Students learn re-structuring and revision and the legalities affecting writers. Students are expected to complete three publishable articles.

ENGLISH 5503 Old English Credits: 3

This course is a study of Old English, its grammar, its poetic style, and its literature, both poetry and prose.

ENGLISH 5508 Harlem Renaissance Credits: 3

This course examines the period from 1920 to 1940, known as the Harlem Renaissance, a time of unprecedented literary and cultural creativity by Black artists. This course explores a variety of cultural productions, not only traditional forms of literature such as novels, short stories, plays and poetry, but also nonliterary objects of study such as painting, sculpture, and music.

ENGLISH 5510 Black Women Writers Credits: 3

This course explores the writings of African American Women Writers. The course examines how these writers have interacted with and often revised stereotypical representations of African American womanhood typically found within canonical and African American male literatures. The course will examine literature (which might include fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama) of the 19th and 20th centuries; the majority of the works will be by modern and contemporary authors such as Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, and Terry McMillan. By placing the works in this sort of cultural and historical context, it will be possible to examine the unique tradition of African American women's writings as well as individual texts.

ENGLISH 5512 Chaucer Credits: 3

Readings from Chaucer's most important works, especially "The Canterbury Tales" and "Troilus and Criseyde" with emphasis on them as types of medieval genres and on the Middle English language. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5513 Renaissance Literature I Credits: 3

English literature from the time of Wyatt and Surrey to the beginning of the 17th century, including the works of Spenser, Marlowe, Sidney, Shakespeare and others. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5514 Milton Credits: 3

A study of Milton's prose and poetry, with special attention to "Paradise Lost". Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5515 Restoration And Early 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the late 17th century to the mid-18th cetury. Selected writers may include Addison and Steele, Behn, Congreve, Defoe, Dryden, Finch, Pope, Rochester, Swift, and Wortley Montagu.

ENGLISH 5516 The Romantic Period Credits: 3

An extensive study of selected writers (such as Austen, Barbauld, Byron, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Hemans, Keats, Gilpin, the Shelleys, Wollstonecraft, and Wordsworth) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Romantic period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 5517 Modern Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by modernist poets such as Hopkins, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Moore, Pound, H.D., Eliot, Millay, Hughes. Students will make in class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographic work.

ENGLISH 5518 19th-Century American Literature Credits: 3

An intensive study of either selected major American writers in the 19th century or of 19th-century literary movements. Students will make in class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5519 Teaching Writing: Theories, Histories, Contexts, Practices Credits: 3

This course focuses on issues related to the teaching of English at the high school and college levels, with an emphasis on the teaching of writing. Issues addressed may include assignment design, teaching invention and revision, response to and evaluation of writing, collaborative learning, relationships between reading and writing, classroom uses of electronic media, and institutional contexts within which teachers work. The course is required of Graduate Teaching Assistants in the UMKC Composition Program, to be taken either prior to or concurrently with their first semester of teaching. Secondary English teachers and others interested in English teaching are also welcome.

ENGLISH 5520 Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

Studies in methods and objectives for the teaching of English with special attention to secondary school teaching. This course is repeatable for credit with advisor approval.

ENGLISH 5520A Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5520B Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5520D Greater Kansas City Writing Project Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5522 Medieval Literature Credits: 3

Western religious and secular verse and prose to the 15th century. Late Middle English works are read in the original; all other selections in translation. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5523 Renaissance Literature II Credits: 3

English literature from 1600 to the beginning of the Restoration, including the works of Donne, Jonson, Milton, and other contemporaries. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5526 The Victorian Period Credits: 3

An intensive study of selected writers (such as Arnold, Braddon, the Brontes, the Brownings, Dickens, Darwin, Eliot, Gaskell, Hardy, Ruskin, and the Rossettis) organized around literary themes and/or cultural issues important to the Victorian period.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 327.

ENGLISH 5527 Contemporary Poetry Credits: 3

Study of works by contemporary poets (post- World War II), such as Auden, Bishop, Hayden, Berryman, Rukeyser, Larkin, Rich, Plath, Heaney, Boland, and Komunyakaa. Students will make in class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographic work.

ENGLISH 5528 20th Century American Literature Credits: 3

Major American writers or literary movements of the 20th century. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5529 Graduate Seminar: Screenwriting Credits: 3

A seminar on advanced theory in narrative screenwriting, script analysis and constructive story editing. Students draft, revise and workshop a short film script or a feature screen play, and deliver a pitch, treatment, draft and revision of the first act and detailed outline of the whole script. Students workshop feature screenplays in small groups.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 429B or COMM-ST 454.

Cross Listings: COMM-ST 354.

ENGLISH 5531 Late 18th-Century British Literature Credits: 3

British literature from the mid to late 18th century. Selected writers may include Blake, Burney, Collins, Equiano, Fielding, Gray, Johnson, Sheridan, and Wollstonecraft.

ENGLISH 5532 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction Credits: 3

A course for advanced students of fiction writing. The class will proceed through analysis of models, discussion of general principles, and critique of student work. Students will simultaneously be encouraged to experiment and to refine the form and subjects best suited to their talents. Emphasis will remain on the short story, though there may be units in other forms--novella, film script, the non-fiction essay. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

ENGLISH 5533 Histories Of Writing, Reading, And Publishing Credits: 3

A study of selected topics concerning the material practices of writing, reading, and publishing within specific cultural and historical contexts. Issues examined may include authorship, education, information technologies, libraries, literacy, periodicals, popular literature, publishers, and communities of readers.

ENGLISH 5534 Postcolonial Literature Credits: 3

An exploration of postcolonialism through the study of literary and theoretical texts created by or representing peoples whose historical experience has been decisively shaped by the experience or legacies of colonialism. Texts will be drawn from a variety of genres and from several countries. The course will consider several definitions of postcolonialism and related terms such as cosmopolitanism, hybridity, diaspora, and nationalism.

ENGLISH 5535 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry Credits: 3

An advanced poetry workshop that includes intensive reading of contemporary poetry and aims at each student creating a portfolio of publishable poems. The focus of the course will vary to address a variety of topics such as metaphor and closure; imitation and the line; form and voice. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

ENGLISH 5536 Poetic Forms Credits: 3

An advanced creative writing course that focuses on intensive study of and practice in metrics and traditional and nonce forms. May be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 315 or equivalent.

ENGLISH 5537 Prose Forms Credits: 3

This course covers techniques for planning and drafting major prose forms. Students will learn how to use content as a guide to inventing new forms (i.e. novella, novel, linked-story collection, episodic novel, essay novel, and creative nonfiction book.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 432WI, ENGLISH 435WI.

ENGLISH 5538 Women's Literature in Africa and the African Diaspora Credits: 3

This course is a comparative examination of the variety of literary works produced by women of African descent in the United States, the Caribbean and Africa. Students will explore the cross-cultural implications of texts in light of the intersections of gender, race and class.

Cross Listings: BLKS 5538.

ENGLISH 5540 American Culture Credits: 3

Texts that offer perspectives on key historical themes of American culture. Texts may be grouped around any culturally significant principle (e.g. region, race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion) or theme (e.g. the mythology of the frontier, marriage and domesticity, the American Dream). Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5541 Girls And Print Culture Credits: 3

This course deals with girls' relationships to the continually evolving print culture. Students will examine various literary representations of girlhood by adult writers, explore texts directed at girls (e.g., conduct books, periodicals, textbooks), and study the writing and reading practices of girls themselves.

ENGLISH 5545 History And Principles Of Rhetoric Credits: 3

A study of selected writings of ancient and modern rhetoricians illustrating key issues in the development of Western discourse theory and practice. Issues examined include the relationships between rhetoric and knowledge, orality and literacy, and rhetoric and poetics. Attention will also be given to the implications of rhetorical theory for modern language instruction. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5546 From Field Shout to Hip Hop: African American Poetic Traditions Credits: 3

This course examines the development of African American poetry from its early forms as field shouts, ballads, and blues to present forms including spoken word and hip hop. Includes authors such as Phillis Wheatley, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Tupac Shakur, and Jessica Care Moore.

ENGLISH 5547 Theory and Criticism in English Studies Credits: 3

A survey of major schools and methods of literary theory and criticism. Authors and texts to be determined by the instructor of the course.

ENGLISH 5548 External Internship Credits: 1-3

Students may complete an external internship involving writing and editing with a publishing company, trade magazine, literary or academic journal, other print or electronic media organization, or with advertising, public relations, or non-profit firms. Internships are granted on a competitive basis. Students will compile a portfolio of their work under the direction of the internship supervisor to be submitted for evaluation to the department’s internship coordinator.

ENGLISH 5549A Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course provides practical experience with New Letters magazine, New Letters on the Air, and BkMk Press in business analysis/reporting, copy-editing, manuscript evaluation, promotion/grant development, library research, market research, and other skills. The practicum is limited to three students per semester, to be chosen on the basis of demonstrated writing and organizational skills. References are required. May be taken for no more than three credit hours over a maximum of two semesters. Permission of the instructors required.

ENGLISH 5549B Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course covers the basics of producing an issue of an academic journal. Students acquire hands-on experience at all stages of production.

ENGLISH 5549C Publication Practicum Credits: 1-3

This course allows students to work with a faculty member on an ad hoc project for publication such as a special journal issue or festschrift, book manuscript, a new scholarly edition of a primary text, or a digital edition. Course may be repeated once for continued work on the same project.

ENGLISH 5550 Graduate Seminar Credits: 3

Authors, works and intellectual currents which form the basis of these seminars may vary from semester to semester, depending upon the instructor's design for the course. May be repeated for credit. Continued in ENGLISH 5555.

ENGLISH 5550A Graduate Seminar Medieval Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550B Graduate Seminar Renaissance Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550C Graduate Seminar Neo-Classical Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550D Graduate Seminar 19th Century Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550E Graduate Seminar American Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550F Graduate Seminar Modern Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550G Graduate Seminar Literary Criticism Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550H Graduate Seminar Studies In Fiction I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550I Graduate Seminar In Dramatic Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550J Graduate Seminar: History Of The English Language Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550K Graduate Seminar: Creative Writing Prose Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550M Graduate Seminar In Rhetoric And Composition Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550MA Greater Kansas City Writing Project: Invitational Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550MC Greater K.C. Writing Project:Writing & The Teaching Of Literature Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550MD Greater Kc Writing Project:Critical Thinking & Process Writing Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550ME Greater K.C. Wrtg Project:Researching The Theories Of Tchng Wrtng Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550N Graduate Seminar: Criticism Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5550P Graduate Seminar: Sociolinguistics And Dialectology Credits: 3

Seminar focusing on the role of social factors in language use, and on the origin and development of regional and urban dialects in English. Special attention will be paid to sociolinguistic motivations for change, variation and merger in dialects and languages in contact, and Black English.

ENGLISH 5551 Shakespeare Comedies And Histories Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major comedies and history plays with special emphasis on his dramatic works before 1600. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5552 Early English Drama Credits: 3

English religious and secular drama prior to Shakespeare. Mystery and morality plays are studied with emphasis on their literary and social backgrounds. Close readings of such works as "Everyman," "The Wakefield Second Shepherd's Play," and "The Spanish Tragedy." Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5553 Modern Drama 1880-1945 Credits: 3

A study of modern drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory, and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the earlier modern playwrights from Ibsen to Shaw, with special attention to naturalism. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5554 The Civil Rights Movement in African American Literature Credits: 3

This course examines how African American literature shaped ideas about freedom, rights, citizenship and race in the civil rights movement. It draws on a variety of literary forms-speeches, essays, autobiographies, fiction, drama, poetry and film-to explore the movement's impact on communities and cultures as well as its various debates and competing visions.

ENGLISH 5555 Graduate Seminar Credits: 3

Graduate Seminar - second half.

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 5550.

ENGLISH 5555A Graduate Seminar Medieval Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555B Graduate Seminar Renaissance Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555C Graduate Seminar Neo-Classical Literature I Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555D Graduate Seminar In 19th-Century Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555E Graduate Seminar American Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555F Graduate Seminar In Modern Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555G Graduate Seminar Literary Criticism Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555H Graduate Seminar Studies In Fiction II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555I Graduate Seminar In Dramatic Literature II Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555J Graduate Seminar English Language Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555K Graduate Seminar In Creative Writing:Poetry Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555M Graduate Seminar: Composition Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5555N Graduate Seminar: Prose Fiction Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5556 Studies In The Novel 1740-1900 Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major novelists of the eighteenth or nineteenth century. The content of the course will change, depending on the instructor. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5557 Stages toward Freedom: African American Dramatic Traditions Credits: 3

This course explores the development of African American dramatic traditions from the eighteenth century through the Harlem Renaissance, Black Arts Movement, to current postmodernism. Includes authors such as W.W. Brown, Zora N. Hurston, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks.

ENGLISH 5558 Slave Narratives: Race, Gender and Writing Freedom Credits: 3

A truly American, home grown genre and powerful force in the development of American political and social realities, the African American Slave Narrative is an established, recognized influence in the development of African American and American literary history. In this course you will have the opportunity to explore the historical trajectory of the Slave Narrative, looking at early formulations of its structure, purpose and conventions—especially in terms of gender and race, subsequent various permutations, and the eventual development of the Neo-slave Narrative as its resurrection, which adds to the complexity and theoretical impact of the literary autobiography from black perspectives.

ENGLISH 5559 African American Migrations in Literature Credits: 3

The course examines representations of two different trajectories of migration in African American literature: African American journeys from the south to northern and mid-western regions of America, and concurrent migrations of Caribbean people to the US in the early twentieth century.

ENGLISH 5560 Special Topics Credits: 1-4

The professor who gives this course determines what its content shall be. All aspects of English studies are within its possible range.

ENGLISH 5561 Shakespeare:Tragedies And Romances Credits: 3

A study of Shakespeare's major tragedies and late romances with special emphasis on his dramatic literature after 1600. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5562 Restoration And 18th- Century Drama Credits: 3

The drama after the restoration of the monarchy and the reopening of the theatres through the 18th century. Special emphasis is placed on the comedy of manners and the heroic drama in the Restoration and the sentimental comedy in the 18th-century. Includes such playwrights as Dryden, Congreve, Etherege, Wycherley, Steele, Lillo, Cumberland, Sheridan, and Goldsmith. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5563 Contemporary Drama Credits: 3

A study of contemporary drama: Continental, British, and American, including history and development, critical theory and literary evaluation. This course will focus on the more recent writers, including the absurdists, with special attention to experimental drama. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5564 Medieval Methods & Paleography Credits: 3

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of medieval handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will examine the historical and cultural settings for medieval texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textural transmission in the medieval world. In addition to gaining familiarity with the many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal, and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for practical archival work in various European nations.

Prerequisites: First Year Latin.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5583.

ENGLISH 5565 Studies In Modern Novel Credits: 3

An intensive study of no more than three major 20th- century novelists. The content of the course will change depending on the instructor. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5566CA Cluster Course: Images Of The Human Body In The Renaissance Credits: 3

Focusing on Renaissance conceptions of the human body, this cluster treats the following topics as they are reflected in Renaissance literature, art, astrology, astronomy, biology, anatomy, medicine, and politics: A) The dignity of the human body B) Microcosm and macrocosm. C) The human body and the heavens D) Stranger manifestations: freaks and beasts E) The humors F) Disorders of the human body G) The body politic H) The human body as an object of study.

ENGLISH 5566CF Courts And Culture In The Middle Ages Credits: 3

This cluster course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Middle Ages, focusing on medieval cultures in Europe. Arranged around a series of themes, the cluster will read a variety of documentary and literary texts to investigate not only the "high culture" of the courts but also the interactions of people from various social backgrounds in Western Europe.

ENGLISH 5575 Advanced Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction Credits: 3

This course is devoted to the study and crafting of the personal essay. Students will explore - and - practice many different varieties of this diverse form. Whether in the guise of aesthetic appreciation, cultural critique, personal history, political reportage, or travelogue, our course readings are first and foremost PERSONAL narratives, both troubled and enriched by their subjectivity (the essay's ' I '). Students will study the many challenges particular to this form (most of which concern notions of truth, and its rendering) and strive to overcome them as they create vivid personal narratives of their own.

ENGLISH 5582 European Literature: 18th Century Credits: 3

The 18th-century course will focus on a representative sampling from authors such as Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Voltaire, Prevost, La Bruyere, La Rochefoucauld, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau, Schiller, Goethe, and Grimmelshausen. Students will make in-class presentations and submit papers requiring research and bibliographical work.

ENGLISH 5591 Research In Selected Fields Credits: 1-3

Individual study under the direction of a senior member of the department, leading to the writing of a formal or scholarly paper. May be repeated for credit.

ENGLISH 5598A MFA Thesis Credits: 3-6

Under the guidance of a graduate MFA faculty member, students completing the MFA must complete and orally defend a publishable or producible manuscript. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit.

ENGLISH 5599 Research And Thesis Credits: 1-9

A student, with permission of the graduate committee, may write a thesis for 3 hours credit.

ENGLISH 5600 Introduction To Doctoral Study In English Credits: 3

Introduction to research skills necessary for doctoral work, particularly for writing the thesis; attention will be paid both to traditional skills such as bibliography and to computer skills.

ENGLISH 5601 Culminating Experience in Literature Credit: 1

Under the guidance of a graduate faculty member in English, students following the program of study in Literature must revise and orally defend a 20-30 page paper in Literature on a pass/no pass basis.

ENGLISH 5602 Culminating Experience in Language & Literature Credit: 1

Under the Guidance of a graduate faculty member in English, Students following the program of study in Language & Literature must revise and orally defend a 20-30 page paper in Language & Literature on a pass/no pass basis.

ENGLISH 5603 Culminating Experience in Manuscript, Print Culture, & Editing. Credit: 1

Under the guidance of a graduate faculty member in English, students following the program of Study in Manuscript, Print Culture, and Editing must revise and orally defend a 20-30 page paper in Manuscript, Print Culture, and Editing on a pass/no pass basis.

ENGLISH 5650 Doctoral Seminar Credits: 3

ENGLISH 5691 Doctoral Research In Selected Fields Credits: 3

Individual study under the direction of a senior member of the department leading to the writing of a formal or scholarly paper. May be repeated for credit.

ENGLISH 5699 Research And Dissertation Credits: 1-15

Research and preparation for the doctoral dissertation.

ENGLISH 5899 Required Graduate Enrollment Credit: 1