Courses

HISTORY 101 U.S. History to 1877 Credits: 3

This course offers a broad survey of American history up to 1877.

HISTORY 102 U.S. History Since 1877 Credits: 3

This course covers American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present.

HISTORY 127 Global Inequality: Slavery in Historical and Archaeological Perspective Credits: 3

Using archaeological and historical evidence from around the world, including the state of Missouri and the Kansas City region, students will explore the conditions which gave rise to inequality. By exploring slavery in various forms, students will understand its historical development, as well as its continued impact on society today.

Co-requisites: DISC 100.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 127

HISTORY 201 European History to 1600 Credits: 3

This course surveys the political, social and cultural history of Europe from ancient times to 1600. Beginning with a brief description of the riverine civilizations of the ancient Near East, the course then examines the political and cultural evolution of classical Greco-Roman civilization, the medieval world, the rise of the national state, and the essential characteristics of the eras of the Renaissance and Reformation.

HISTORY 202 European History since 1600 Credits: 3

This course surveys the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe from about 1600 to the present. Emphasis is given to themes of continuity and change in European culture through the experience of political, scientific and industrial revolutions, conservative reactions, liberal reforms, nation building, imperialism, two world wars, fascism, communism and the Cold War.

HISTORY 206 World History To 1450 Credits: 3

This course surveys the cultural, social, economic, and political history of the world to 1450. It studies the development of civilizations in isolation as well as the origins, nature, and consequences of global forms of interaction and exchange.

HISTORY 208 World History since 1450 Credits: 3

This course surveys the social, economic, political history of the world from 1450 to the present. It studies the development of civilizations in isolation as well as the origins, nature, and consequences of global forms of interaction and exchange.

HISTORY 213 Researching Kansas City Credits: 3

Researching Kansas City is an interdisciplinary undergraduate research course open to honors and other high-achieving students. It will introduce students to scholarly research and analysis through the exploration of important issues of the past and present in Kansas City.

Prerequisite: Honors Program Student.

Cross Listings: HONORS 215.

HISTORY 215 Getting High: Alcohol & Drugs in American History Credits: 3

This class will investigate historical transformations in how American society has defined and responded to problematic drinking and drug use. The class will analyze what controversies surrounding various forms of intoxication indicate about the nature of American society and culture.

HISTORY 300B Special Studies In History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300BB Special Studies in History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300BL Special Studies In History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300C Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300CF Cluster Course: Race in American Film Credits: 3

This course examines representations of race and ethnicity in American film from the silent era onward in mainstream and countercultural traditions. It explores how social, political, and economic conditions contribute to constructions of race and ethnicity.

Cross Listings: ENGLISH 300CQ.

HISTORY 300CO CC:Women In the Ancient World Credits: 3

This focuses on the history, representation, literature, social lives, and political roles ow women in ancient civilization including Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Biblical World, Greece, and Rome. It integrates methodologies from history, art history and archaeology, literary studies, and women's studies.

HISTORY 300D Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300F Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300G Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300H Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300J Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300K Special Studies History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300L Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300MC Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300MM Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300P Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300R Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300RA Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300RB Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300RH Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300SS Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300W Special Studies History Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300WY Decade of Dissent: The 1960s Credits: 3

The social movements and conflicts that developed during the 1960s continue to define American culture. Questions of racial and gender equity, a greater willingness to challenge authority, concerns about the environment, and a new openness about issues of sexuality all developed during the sixties and remain as arenas of debate today. This course will examine the origins, contexts, and major themes of the these social and cultural movements.

HISTORY 301WI Historiography and Method Credits: 3

This basic course is required of all history majors at the beginning of the junior year. Content includes: 1) what history is; 2) its value and usefulness; 3) the diversity of our fields, approaches, and methods; and 4) the techniques of preparing and writing history papers. Texts and reading are approved by the Department (i.e.: Turabian for style). Although the emphasis is general instead of particular, the instructor will be assisted by other historians representing their main special interest areas.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

HISTORY 302 Colonial North America, 1492–1763 Credits: 3

This course examines European colonization in North America, from the voyage of Christopher Columbus to the eve of the American Revolution. Students will consider the Atlantic-world context of colonization, the environmental factors that shaped colonial development, and the complex interactions of European, African, and Indian peoples.

HISTORY 303 The American Revolution, 1763-1789 Credits: 3

This course examines the history of the American Revolution, from the explosive political crisis of the 1760s to the struggle over ratification of the Constitution. Students will consider the origins and conduct of the war, as well as the Revolution’s far-reaching political, social, and economic consequences.

HISTORY 304 America, 1783-1828: The National Experience Credits: 3

The two major threads of this course are the formation and implementation of the Constitution and the cultural adolescence of the new nation. Topics considered include the political bequest of the framers' generation, the growing pains of territorial expansion and industrialism, the paradoxical development of regionalism and nationalism.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5504.

HISTORY 305 America, 1828-1852: The Jacksonian Period Credits: 3

An analysis of the political, social, economic, and intellectual factors in American society, 1828-1852. The period featured the presidency of Andrew Jackson, the shaping of a new democratic ideology, the culmination of manifest destiny, the quickening of the antislavery impulse, the Mexican War, the growing sectional split, and the Compromise of 1850.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5505.

HISTORY 306 America, 1850-1877: Civil War and Reconstruction Credits: 3

A survey of the political, social and economic factors leading to the dissolution of the federal union is followed by a consideration of the major features and developments of the war period. This, in turn, leads to an analysis of the major factors and relationships involved in the "reconstruction" of the federal union. The course covers the years 1850 to 1877.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5506.

HISTORY 306A History of Christianity to the Middle Ages Credits: 3

This course examines the cultural, historical and theological development of Christianity from its origins to the High Middle Ages. The main themes follow the mechanisms and conditions shaping Christianity's expansion into a major cultural, social, institutional, and intellectual force in Western Europe with a focus on patterns of crisis and reform.

HISTORY 307 America 1877-1917: Development of Industrial America Credits: 3

This course deals with the reactions of different groups of Americans to the industrialization and urbanization of the United States from 1877 to 1917, using concepts associated with modernization upon the behavior of the business community, farmers, laborers, immigrants, professionals and major ethno-cultural groupings. Other contemporary proposals for the adjustment to industrialism are explained as well as the programs which each group eventually used to adjust to modern society.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5507.

HISTORY 307A History of Christianity from the Middles Ages to Present Credits: 3

This course examines the cultural, historical and theological development of Christianity from the High Middle Ages to the present. The main themes follow the development of foundational Christian theological thought and practice into what are now mainstream Western Christian theologies, the institutional histories of Western Christianity, and the cultures of Western civilization.

HISTORY 308A America: 1914-1945: The Era Of The World Wars Credits: 3

This course examines United States social, intellectual, economic, political and diplomatic history from the beginning of World War I to the end of World War II. Special emphasis is placed on the coexistence of realism and idealism in American foreign policy, the evolution of power shifts within the American federal system, and the causes and consequences of rapid urban growth and increased industrial sophistication. Students examine the material and social texture of life during the two world wars, the so-called "roaring 20s", and the Great Depression through contemporary art forms (especially novels) and historical monographs.

HISTORY 308B Cold War, Conformity, and Dissent: America, 1945-1989 Credits: 3

This course examines United States social, cultural, intellectual, economic, political, and transformational history from the end of World War II in 1945 to the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989. Given our focus on the recent past, special emphasis is placed upon the importance of the historical perspective to an understanding of contemporary affairs. Major themes include: America's rise to the world power, the development of the Keynesian welfare state, the concentration of corporate wealth and power, the persistence of poverty amidst plenty, and the changing status of American women and racial and ethnic minority groups.

HISTORY 309 World War II Film and Propaganda Credits: 3

This course examines film and propaganda, including posters, political cartoons, speeches, and other media, created in prewar or wartime conditions by both the Allies and Axis powers from 1933 to 1945 as it affected World War II.

HISTORY 330PW The Works of Western Man Credits: 4

In the period 1750-1987, the nations bordering the Atlantic Ocean, largely relying on their technological advances, became world powers. This course, relying on analysis of films plus required readings, will survey the energy sources employed, the tools developed, and the regimes of the workplace which led to this dominance. Grades will be assigned to three types of exercises: frequent quizzes, a mini-project in historical research and a book critique of a piece of fiction.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

HISTORY 331P America In The Machine Age Credits: 4

The United States has experienced repeated waves of technological advancements. This course will largely focus on industrialization in the 19th century as well as consumer society of our own era. How Americans produced goods and what were the dynamics of the market place are two central themes. Required readings will be complemented by films and presentations from resource persons throughout Kansas City. A research project and three tests are required.

HISTORY 348 Missouri/Kansas Border Wars Credits: 3

This course explores the history of the Civil War on the Missouri/Kansas border, where residents first shed blood over the issue slavery. An exploration of this most uncivil of wars provides insight into the ways in which societies can be fragmented by ideology and ultimately rebuilt upon different lines.

HISTORY 354R Women in Modern America Credits: 3

This course traces the part women have played in the processes of industrialization and urbanization. It looks at the general demographic, economic and social changes affecting women of all classes, as well as the role of middle-class women in the progressive, prohibition and suffrage movements. The course will also study the impact of the two world wars and the Depression upon the roles of women.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5554.

HISTORY 355BA Indians of North America to 1789 Credits: 3

The history of the native peoples of North America from their origins to the era of the American Revolution.

HISTORY 355BB Indians of North America Since 1789 Credits: 3

The history of the native people of North America (Indians and Inuit) and their interaction with the European invaders since 1789. This course is the sequel to HISTORY 355BA, Indians of North America to 1789.

HISTORY 356 Rise of the City in the U.S. Credits: 3

This course treats the background and major developments of the urbanization of the United States. Includes the American urban tradition, the scope of urbanization, colonial beginnings, urban rivalries, promotion, case studies of cities, the growth of urban services, the slum, problems of government, population trends, urban planning, and suburban growth. Consideration is also given to the methods and techniques of urban research and history of the development of this field.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5556.

HISTORY 356R Kansas City: History of a Regional Metropolis Credits: 3

This course uses Kansas City as an urban laboratory to help students better understand the dynamics of the urbanization process in America. It features lectures and discussions on such subjects as early settlement patterns, the battle for the first bridge over the Missouri River, the development of an economy based on agricultural pursuits, the City Beautiful Movement, the social fabric, the Pendergast Machine, and the impact of World War II and after. The course fits Kansas City into the larger framework of the American urban mosaic.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5556R.

HISTORY 357 The American West Credits: 3

This course deals with the relationship of the American West to the social and economic development of the United States. Major emphasis is placed on the role of the trans-Mississippi West in the economic growth of the national economy. Related cultural and political events are evaluated in the terms of the many Western frontiers. Emphasis will be placed on the Turner thesis, the Indian heritage, frontier violence, and the cow town experience.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5557.

HISTORY 358 History of the American South I Credits: 3

A study of the political, intellectual, cultural, economic, and social development of the American South up to and including the Civil War. Special topics discussed will be the plantation system, slavery, abolition, secession, the Confederacy, and the interaction of the region with the nation.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5558R.

HISTORY 360R Constitutional History of the United States Credits: 3

The general question covered is: how does American society govern itself? Topics include the fusion of Anglo traditions and American environment, creation of the American republic under the Constitution of 1787, the struggle for sovereignty during the Marshall-Taney era, and the Supreme Court's utilization of the 14th Amendment to adapt the Constitution to modernity.

HISTORY 361 America and the World in the Global Age: 1900 to the Present Credits: 3

Following a rapid survey of American diplomatic and transnational affairs before 1900, this course analyzes America's increasingly complex encounters with the world - by government officials and non-state actors - since that date. Attention is given to the interrelationships of domestic and international contexts, with an attempt to discover political, geographic, technological, cultural, and economic influences that have shaped this area of American development.

HISTORY 364R Nature, Culture And The Human Experience Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to various interpretations of nature with a focus on American culture and society. We will consider ideas about nature from diverse perspectivesincluding history, literature, philosophy and religion-in order to understand how human perceptions and uses shape relations with the natural world. Specific themes include such diverse topics as the aesthetic tradition, environmental thought, and environmental justice.

HISTORY 365A American Environmental History Credits: 3

This course examines the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. The main argument of this course will be that American History looks very different through an environmental lens. Nature is an important category of historical analysis-as well as a topic worthy of historical study itself-and this course will examine themes as diverse as Native American ecology to the modern environment crusade.

HISTORY 366RR American Labor History Credits: 3

This course examines the history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1750 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement, the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers' relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5566RR.

HISTORY 368 Children and Youth in American History Credits: 3

This course-which brings a gendered perspective to the history of childhood and the study of youth-focuses on the changing construction of girlhood and boyhood from precontact to the present. We will examine the variety of forces that have scripted the lives of children and adolescents and explore the active role they have played in shaping their lives and American culture. We will make use of the scholarly literature on childhood and youth as well as examine such primary sources as childbearing manuals, laws, literature, cartoons, and toys as material culture.

HISTORY 369 Women and Work in Early America Credits: 3

This course examines the ways in which gender, race, region, and class have shaped the historical experiences of American women. Students will trace women’s lives from pre-European contact to 1877 through an examination of a wide variety of social, cultural, economic, and political forces and factors.

HISTORY 370 Introduction to Material Culture Credits: 3

This course will consider the ways in which material culture contributes to our understanding of history. Scholars have increasingly recognized the significance of "the things they left behind," particularly as they provide insights to the lives of those who did not leave extensive written records. Students will consider all aspects of material culture, drawing largely on examples from American history: architecture, domestic utensils and furnishings, clothing, tools, and good agricultural practices. The courses will emphasize the process of handicraft technology as well as the product, and will consider the impact of modernization upon both process and product.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5570.

HISTORY 371 American History Through Film Credits: 3

This course will move through the twentieth century and highlight major themes and developments that reveal the contours of American history as depicted in film. Students will examine the ways in which filmmakers have presented history, paying particular attention to the presentation of political, cultural, and social conflicts.

HISTORY 379 Museums, Monuments, and American Life: An Introduction to Public History Credits: 3

This course will investigate the ways America commemorates, invokes, and misremembers its history—what scholars call public history. Students will learn the skills professionals use to communicate historical scholarship to wider audiences, and will grapple with the political and ethical issues that arise when we expand the discipline’s stakeholders.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5579.

HISTORY 391 Archival Methods Credits: 3

This combined discussion and research course will examine the research potential of primary-source materials in the custody of archival depositories and the methodology employed to utilize effectively these resources. An analysis of archival method, specifically in the areas of arrangement, description and preservation, will be emphasized during the discussion portion of the course. Most of the course will be devoted to independent research in various collections of the Regional Archives of the Kansas City Federal Records Center. The course will meet at such places as the Federal Records Center, 2306 Bannister Road, or the Truman Library for both the discussion and research segments.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5591.

HISTORY 392A Archival Internship Credits: 1-3

Students work directly with professional archivists and other personnel at the Kansas City Federal Records Center, the Truman Library, Jackson County Historical Society, and similar facilities in the area. Emphasis will be given to areas of arrangement, description and preservation of archival materials. Each student must make individual arrangements through the department.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5592.

HISTORY 392B Public History Internship Credits: 1-3

Students work directly with public history and editorial personnel at the Kansas City Museum, the Kansas City Pitch Weekly, the Truman Library, and similar facilities in the area. Depending on the institutional affiliation, emphasis will be given to museum operations and displays, editing, fund-raising, historical research and writing. Each student must make individual arrangements through the department.

HISTORY 393 Museum Studies Credits: 3

This course is designed to acquaint students with specific careers in museums and historical agencies; to introduce students to the wide range of operating issues facing those working in the museum profession on a day-to-day basis; and to familiarize students with the organizations, reference works and resources available to develop the skills and training required for those who choose to make this their profession.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5593.

HISTORY 394 African American History Before 1877 Credits: 3

This course is a survey of the African American experience from Pre-Columbian exploration through reconstruction. The course focuses on the trans-Atlantic slave trade, slavery in the colonies as well as resistance and abolition movements.

HISTORY 395 African American History Since 1877 Credits: 3

This course is a survey of African Americans in the United States from 1877 to the present. The course explores the post-reconstruction era, civil rights and black nationalistic movements; the concepts of racism, desegregation/integration and separation. Contemporary issues facing a multiracial and pluralistic society are also addressed.

HISTORY 398 Black Civil Rights in the 20th and 21st Centuries Credits: 3

This course examines the fight for black civil rights in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries, focusing on the Jim Crow period, the fight to end segregation, and the enduring problem of race in the United States.

HISTORY 400 Special Studies Credits: 1-3

Courses on subjects which are not a part of the regular department offering. The courses result from one or more of the following: (1) The expressed desire of students; (2) the broadened or refocused scholarship of a member of the history faculty; (3) the temporary presence of a scholar whose specialization is not reflected in the department's regular offerings; (4) the conclusion by the department that the course meets a community need; (5) the effort of the history faculty to provide an interdisciplinary approach to an era or topic. The course is experimental in the sense that it is a one-time offering with the potential of repetition or modification--depending upon student, faculty and community response.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5500R.

HISTORY 400B Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400C Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400CC Special Studies Credits: 3

HISTORY 400CL Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400CP American Social Film: Silver Screen and the American Dream Credits: 3

This course will combine American social history and American film history. Using Hollywood entertainment films, the course will look at Hollywood as an indicator of social, political, and economic conditions in the U.S. from the early 1900s to the late 1950s. The main topics are war and the threat of war, poverty and affluence, racial tensions, censorship, and political zealotry. A paper is required, and a social history textbook, a film history textbook, a play by Arthur Miller and a collection of articles constitute core readings.

Cross Listings: ENGLISH 300CD.

HISTORY 400CW Cluster Course: Critical Issues in Women's & Gender Studies Credits: 3

What does it mean to grow up female in America? How does being female influence the body, the mind, identity? This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the issues that have shaped the lives of American women throughout the life cycle and across the timeline. This course examines the role that culture and society have played in shaping and defining what it means to be an American girl and woman.

Cross Listings: ENGLISH 300CW.

HISTORY 400CY Cluster Course: The Ancient World And The Cinema Credits: 3

This course will explore the tradition of depicting the ancient Mediterranean world in film from the early silent era to the present. Topics to be covered include the ways that filmmakers respond to literary and historical sources from the ancient world, interact with the artistic tradition of films about the ancient world, the relation of these films to other works by the same creative personnel (directors, actors, writers, producers, etc.), and the political and cultural contexts in which the films were released.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 300CY, COMM-ST 300CY, ENGLISH 300CY.

HISTORY 400D Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400F Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400G Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400GN Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400J Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400JCA Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400K Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400LA Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400M Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400SS Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400T Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400W Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 400WI Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 401A Religion in America Credits: 3

An in-depth examination of selected aspects of the history of religions in America from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis will be given to methodological issues in the study of American religious history.

HISTORY 404 Women and Gender in Latin America Credits: 3

This course studies gender in Latin America from the eve of conquest by the Portuguese and Spanish in the fifteenth century to the present. It examines how ideas about gender affected the lives of Latin American men and women. This course additionally analyzes how gender and race contributed to the creation of a hierarchical social order. Finally, it discusses the exercise of authority within and outside households and its impact on private and public spaces.

HISTORY 406 Modern Latin America Credits: 3

This course studies social, political, economic and cultural trends in Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Discussion topics include nation building after independence with an emphasis on gender and race in the creation of national identities and new forms of social stratification; integration of national economies into the world economic system; the expansion of political participation and citizenship; immigration (national and transnational) and the tensions caused by the forces of modernization and tradition. Although the purpose of the course is to provide a general background for a large and diverse region (more than 20 countries), case studies from Argentina, Mexico and Brazil will illustrate the above-mentioned themes and will provide the basis for a comparative regional perspective.

HISTORY 408 Gender, Health, and Development in Senegal Credits: 3

This course examines women’s economic empowerment, health education initiatives, philanthropy, and social entrepreneurship in West Africa and Senegal in particular. In the main city of Dakar we will visit indigenous and global nonprofits to study their policies and processes. The culture, both urban and rural, will be experienced in order to provide a unique perspective on the Senegalese and their culture.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing - must meet requirements established by study abroad office

Cross Listings: HLSC 408, WGS 408.

HISTORY 411A Medieval Civilization I Credits: 3

This course covers the period between the decline of the Roman Empire in the West and the Investiture Controversy. Topics include the rise of Christianity and early church-state relationships; the barbarian invasions and the various Germanic kingdoms; the age of Charlemagne; monasticism and feudalism. There will also be special sessions on the civilizations of Islam and Byzantium.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5511.

HISTORY 411B Medieval Civilization II Credits: 3

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5512.

HISTORY 412A Medieval Women & Children Credits: 3

This course explores the roles of women in the social, economic, political and cultural environments of medieval and early modern Europe. We examine the lives of women in all areas of life, from the ordinary to the extraordinary, in urban and rural environments, from the centers of religious and political power to the margins of society. Focus will be on the world of work for urban and peasant women and on the social and legal institutions of marriage, kinship and the family. The course makes extensive use of primary sources by and about women during this period.

HISTORY 412B The Black Death and Late Medieval Society Credits: 3

This course examines all aspects of late medieval and early Renaissance society in Western Europe. The Black Death of 1348/1349 serves as the entry point into the historical study of the economy, demography, and culture during this transitional period.

HISTORY 413 Renaissance Credits: 3

Beginning with a definition and exploration of the Renaissance as a period of gradual transition between the Middle Ages and the beginning of modern culture, this course concerns itself primarily with the rise and spread of Humanism; the revival of interest in antiquity; the growth of individualism; and the rise of secularism, as well as with the artistic achievements of the period.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5513.

HISTORY 414 Reformation Credits: 3

Beginning with a description and analysis of the social, intellectual and political aspects of the later Middle Ages, the course continues with an examination of those profound religious, social and political changes which mark the 16th century as the end of the Middle Ages and the beginning of the modern secular era.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5514.

HISTORY 415B 17th and 18th Century European History Credits: 3

this course is designed to present the upper-division undergraduate with a firm grasp of the major intellectual, cultural, political and economic developments of 17th and 18th century Europe. It considers the bitter Thirty Years War in Central Europe, the rise of the Netherlands, the fall of Italy and Spain, the rise of constitutional and absolutist styles of government, the scientific revolution, the colonization by European of the Pacific and Indian Ocean Basins, Enlightenment political philosophy, the Agricultural Revolution, and the French Revolution.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5515B.

HISTORY 416R The French Revolution and Napoleon Credits: 3

Narrative history concentrating on the explosive and colorful events and personalities in France, but also showing the European and Western context and impact of the revolution and Napoleon. Illustrated accounts cover such "great days" as the storming of the Bastille, the fall of Robespierre, and Napoleon's Coup of 18 Brumaire, and great battles. Main periods are: the origins of the revolution (economic, social, political, intellectual); revolution and reconstruction (1789-92); through terror to Thermidor (Jacobins and sans-culottes); Napoleon's wars and reconstruction (France and Europe). Cinema, slides and martial music periodically. Discussion of major authors and interpretations.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5516.

HISTORY 417R Nations & Empires:19th Century Europe Credits: 3

This upper-division course will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture in 19th century Europe, paying particular attention to the rise of modern ideologies and identities, world hegemony, and the social technologies of dehumanization that foreshadowed the unprecedented inhumanities of the 20th century.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5517.

HISTORY 418R The Age of Extremes 20th Century History Credits: 3

This upper-division course traces the history of Europe in the 20th century. It will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture, paying particular attention to the issues of modernity and post modernity, imperialism and decolonization, dehumanization and genocide as well as the role of ordinary people in these systems of mass destruction.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5518.

HISTORY 419R Contemporary Europe: 1930-2000 Credits: 3

This upper-division course traces the history of Europe in the period of living memory. It will survey significant trends in warfare, politics, economics, social relations and culture, paying particular attention to the rise of globalization and the condition of postmodernity, decolonization and neocolonization, European unification and everyday life.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5519.

HISTORY 420CC World War I in Film: The World made Modern Credits: 3

This cluster course examines World War I and its legacy through the lenses of international history and film studies. It explores the origins and conduct of the "Great War," as it was called at the time, as well as its transforming effects on the modern international relations and the ongoing process of globalization. It also examines how the war spurred the growth of an infant motion picture industry, and how movies produced during the decades that followed helped shaping popular memories of the conflict-reflecting and shaping cultural discourses regarding the myth or reality of modern civilizational progress; the ethics of modern weaponry; the individual's placed in mass society; constructions of class, race, and gender; and the meaning of national identify in a globalizing world. The class will draw on selected history texts and an array of films and film clips.

HISTORY 425R European Criminal Justice History, 500-1900 Credits: 3

This course will survey European crime, criminal procedure, policing and punishment between 500 and 1900. Particular attention will be given to changing methods of proof (oaths, ordeals, juries); changing type of criminal activity (banditry, vagrancy, witchcraft, professional theft) and changing penal strategies (the stocks, breaking on the wheel, the workhouse, the prison, the penitentiary). English experiences are emphasized.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5525R.

HISTORY 426R The Scientific Revolution, 1500-1700 Credits: 3

An analysis of the intellectual and social currents which culminated in the Scientific Revolution. After presenting the Renaissance world view, the course will examine the influence of humanism, art, religion, and the voyages of discovery on science, as a prelude to understanding the achievements of Galileo, Harvey, Newton, and the scientific societies of the 17th century.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5526R.

HISTORY 427R The Darwinian Revolution, 1650-1900 Credits: 3

An inquiry into the intellectual background of Darwin's "Origin of Species." The course will examine 18th- and 19th-century attitudes toward time, species, change, race, the age of the earth, the nature of fossils, creation, and evolution, as background to understanding the achievement of Darwin and the reception of his work.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5527.

HISTORY 428A History Of The Body Credits: 3

This advanced course will explore the new field of the history of the body, with particular attention to sexuality and gender. Topics will include the history of sexualities, the body and society, body disciplines, medical practices and representations of illness, beauty and fashion, and the relationship between sexualities and nationalisms.

HISTORY 428B Gender & Medicine: Patients & Practitioners From Antiquity to Present Credits: 3

This course explores, in a selective fashion, the role of women in Western medicine both as health care providers and patients. The subject of the history of medicine is too broad to be covered comprehensively in a semester, and so we will focusing on diseases or physical conditions which were believed to be limited to women--childbirth, certain mental health conditions, reproductive health, breast cancer-- as well as the increasing marginalization of women within the profession of health care providers to those branches concerned primarily with "women's problems.

HISTORY 430RA 'We Are The Dead': The Great War Experience Through its Artifacts Credits: 3

World War One was the "war to end all wars"; all previous wars were indeed eclipsed by its scale of destruction. And yet, it was a war that initiated a century of continual bloodshed and crimes against humanity. This course will explore the causes, nature and consquences of the Great War of 1914-18. It will be taught on different themes each Winter semester at the National World War One Memorial Museum at Liberty Memorial.

HISTORY 431R Medieval England, 1066 To 1485 Credits: 3

Beginning with the Norman conquest of England in 1066, this course traces the history of Medieval England through the establishment of the Tudor dynasty. Covered will be such items as the rise of the Angevin Empire, the conflict between monarch & nobility, the evolution of Parliament, as well as the Anglo-French rivalry which culminated in the Hundred Years' War.

HISTORY 432R Tudor England, 1485-1603 Credits: 3

This course covers England from the accession of Henry VII, the first Tudor, to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603 Topics to be covered are: transformation of England into a modern state, the Reformation, the role of Parliament, conflicts with European powers, especially Spain, etc.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5532.

HISTORY 433R History of Britain 1603-1832 Credits: 3

This course surveys the history of Britain from the the rise of the Stuart dynasty through the Industrial Revolution, with particular emphasis on the cultural aspects of political, social, economic, and military changes. Topics include: the domination of the aristocracy; the rise of the Navy; the exploration of the Pacific; the monarchy of George III; the loss of the American colonies; the wars with Napoleon; the Agricultural and early Industrial Revolutions; and the social changes they brought in both Britain and the Empire.

HISTORY 434R History of Britain 1832-Present Credits: 3

This course surveys the history of the British Isles from the industrial revolution to the present day, with a particular emphasis on the cultural aspects of political, social, economic, and military changes. Topics include Victorian society, the rise of the class system, imperialism, the domestic impact of the two world wars, the reaction to the loss of the Empire, pop culture, and contemporary issues.

HISTORY 436R Modern German History Credits: 3

This course traces the history of Central Europe from the fall of Bismarck to the reunification of Germany one century later. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society, elites and 'ordinary' Germans, in the various German-speaking regimes that existed over the course of this era: two empires, two interwar republics, two fascist dictatorships, and three post-fascist republics. All assigned readings will be in English; a background knowledge of European history is recommended.

HISTORY 437AWI Imperial Germanies, 1848-1918 Credits: 3

This course traces the history of German-speaking Central Europe from the Revolutions of 1848 to the collapse of the Hohenzollern and Habsburg empires at the end of World War One. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society and the role played by 'elite' and 'ordinary' people in shaping German history. This reading and writing intensive course will be run as a seminar. Final grades will be based on a portfolio of assignments of which students will select what they consider to be the best examples of their work.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 202, HISTORY 208 (or equivalent).

HISTORY 437BWI First German Republics, 1917-1935 Credits: 3

This course traces the history of the two German Republics during the inter-war years-the First Austrian Republic and the so-called Weimar Republic-from the peace movements of the First World War to the solidification of fascist dictatorships. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society and the role played by "elite" and "ordinary" people in shaping German history. This reading-and writing-intensive course will be run as a seminar. Final grades will be based on a portfolio of assignment of which students will select what they consider to be the best portfolio of assignments of which students will select what they consider to bet the best examples of their work.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 202, HISTORY 208 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

HISTORY 437CWI The Third Reich, 1930-1950 Credits: 3

This course traces the history of the Third Reich--its origins, nature, and crimes against humanity--from its first electoral successes in the Great Depression to the trials of its leaders for various war crimes. At its center stand the challenging questions of the ethical and historical responsibility for the Holocaust. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society and the roles played by 'elite' and 'ordinary' people in shaping this tragic era of German and European history. This reading- and writing-intensive course will be run as a seminar. Final grades will be based on a portfolio of assignments o which students will select what they consider to be the best examples of their work.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 202, HISTORY 208 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

HISTORY 437DWI Cold War Germanies, 1941-1991 Credits: 3

This course traces the history of the three postwar German Republics-- the Second Austrian Republic, the German Democratic Republic, and the Federal Republic of Germany -- from the initial plans of the Allies for postwar reconstruction to the Reunification of Germany in 1991. It will ask students to think critically about relationship between state and society and the role played by 'elite' and ' ordinary' people in shaping, and in the remembering, of German history. This reading-and writing-intensive course will be run as a seminar. Final grades will be based on a portfolio of assignments of which students will select what they consider to be the best examples of their work.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 202, HISTORY 208 (or equivalent), RooWriter.

HISTORY 444R Islam and the Arabs: The Formative Period Credits: 3

The first semester of a three-semester sequence begins with a brief overview of the geography and topography of the Middle East. The course proceeds with a discussion of the conditions of pre-Islamic Arabia; the appearance of Muhammad and his mission; the rise and spread of Islam; the establishment and consolidation of the Arab dynasties in the Middle East, North Africa and Spain; Islamic institutions; and Islamic society and culture. The time span will be approximately 500 A.D. to the Mongol conquest of Baghdad in 1258.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5544.

HISTORY 445 The Ottoman Empire in the Middle East to World War I Credits: 3

The second semester of a three-semester sequence covers the transition from Arab to Turkish hegemony in most of the Middle East as well as the restoration of native Persian dynasties in Iran and their subsequent development. The emphasis is on the rise and decline of the Ottoman Turkish Empire. Attention is given to the Ottoman provinces and to the national movements of subject peoples. The course ends with an overview of World War I and the peace treaties which marked the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5545.

HISTORY 446R The Middle East from World War I to the Present Credits: 3

The third semester of a three-semester sequence deals with the emergence of the modern countries of the Middle East after World War I and their history and course of development to the present day. There will be a general survey of the government and politics, economic situation, and social and cultural characteristics of each important country in the area. In addition, special topics will be discussed such as the modernization process, ideological alternatives, relations with the great powers, the economics and politics of oil, and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5546.

HISTORY 462J Japanese Civilization Credits: 3

A survey of Japanese civilization and cultural history from the prehistorical period to the present. Emphasis on the interplay between religion, the arts, politics, and social structure.

HISTORY 464 Medieval Methods and Paleography Credits: 3

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of medieval handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will examine the historical and cultural settings for medieval texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textural transmission in the medieval world. In addition to gaining familiarity with the many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal, and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for practical archival work in various European nations.

Prerequisites: LATIN 110.

HISTORY 468R Archaeology and the History of Antiquity Credits: 3

This course will analyze the contributions of archaeology to the understanding of ancient history. It will cover archaeological excavations and their pertinence to classical civilization in the Near East and Greece. The techniques and methodology of field archaeologists will be discussed and demonstrated. Archaeological excavations relating to the Hittite capital, to the Ugaritic tablets, to the Minoan-Mycenaean civilization and its link to the Near East will be treated.

HISTORY 469 Archeology and Biblical History Credits: 3

An examination of ancient Israel as she emerges from the ruins of the past, both lapidary and literary. Through a study of the "mute documents," artifacts man-made (storied cities, household utensils, inscribed shards from Jericho to Jerusalem) we gain an insight indispensable for Biblical studies, for ancient Near Eastern history.

HISTORY 470 Ancient Egypt Credits: 3

This course describes the political, social and cultural evolution of ancient Egypt from pre-dynastic times, with major emphasis upon the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms (especially the 18th dynasty and the reign of Akhenaton).

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5570R.

HISTORY 470P Ancient World: The Social History Of The Ancient World Credits: 4

The optional four-credit-hour component (modified independent study) will concern the social aspects of these civilizations, i.e., their daily lives. Readings and audiovisual aids will be used to help the student who will be expected to choose one aspect of each civilization, such as women, slavery, merchants, education, medicine, etc., and write a five-page paper about that topic for each period, i.e., Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome.

HISTORY 471 Ancient Greece Credits: 3

This course begins with a survey of the pre-classical Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations and then describes the rise of prominent Greek city-states (with particular emphasis upon the evolution of Sparta and the political, social and cultural contributions of Athens). The course concludes with the rise of Macedon and Alexander's conquests and significance.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5571R.

HISTORY 471P Ancient World: The Political Structure Of The Ancient World Credits: 4

The four-hour lecture period on weeknights will emphasize the historical aspects of the ancient civilizations. The lectures will be chronologically organized to focus upon their evolution from their rise to their collapse.

HISTORY 472 Ancient Rome Credits: 3

This course covers Roman history from its origins (including the Etruscans) to the decline of the imperial system. Particular emphasis is placed upon the political, social and economic developments in the Republic, the death of the Republic, the early Principate, and the factors that led to Rome's decline in the ancient world.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5572R.

HISTORY 472P Ancient World: The Cul/Intellectual Dimension Of Ancient Civi Credits: 4

The four weekend periods will provide the students with a general picture of these civilizations: society, religion, economics, and culture (w.f., arts, literature, philosophy, science, etc.). Guest lecturers, slides, films and video cassettes will be used to introduce the varied aspects of these ancient peoples.

HISTORY 474 Late Antiquity: The transformation of the Mediterranean World (200–600 AD) Credits: 3

The decline of the Roman Empire and the barbarian invasions transformed the Mediterranean and European worlds, forming the foundation of Europe and the Islamic world. Students will investigate the multicultural society of Late Antiquity and become familiar with the primary sources for the period.

Cross Listings: CLASSICS 474, HISTORY 5574.

HISTORY 475WI The History of Ancient Israel Credits: 3

Judaism has had a tremendous impact on our civilization and yet most Americans are only dimly aware of its origins and development. This course will trace the roots of the Jewish religion in its historical context from its beginnings through the formation of rabbinic culture. The rise of Christianity will be examined in its original Judaic context, and recent discoveries, particularly those pertaining to the Dead Sea Scrolls, will be interpreted.

Prerequisites: RooWriter.

HISTORY 476 Medieval Jewish History Credits: 3

This course covers the general period from the decline of the Roman Empire to the dawn of early modern times. It is concerned with Jewish centers of life and learning in the Diaspora, both East and West. The course considers the Jews under Islamic rule from the time of Mohammed through the Golden Age of Moorish Spain. The focus then shifts to the situation of the Jews in Christian Europe, from the period of Constantine to the expulsions from England, France and Christian Spain. The Jews in the Ottoman Empire are mentioned and the course ends with the episode of Sabbatai Zevi, the false Messiah.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5576R.

HISTORY 477 Modern Jewish History Credits: 3

This course surveys modern Jewish history from the Napoleonic period to World War II. Analyzing the social status of the Jews in Medieval Europe, it proceeds towards a discussion of the growth of the national state and the breakup of the Holy Roman Empire and analyzes the growth of socialism, integral nationalism, and liberalism as they affected the Jewish communities in Europe and America. The course serves as a survey of modern political and economic trends as they affect a distinct group.

Cross Listings: HISTORY 5577R.

HISTORY 494 #Heartlandia: Digital Histories of the Midwest Credits: 3

What is the Midwest? The course will consider the political, economic, and religious history of mid-America in order to define the Midwest. Students will collaboratively contribute to an ongoing digital history project like a podcast or virtual exhibit, gaining an understanding of the region as well as new technical skills.

HISTORY 496 Historical Research Project Credits: 1-3

Working extensively with an individual faculty member actively engaged in his/her research, students practice the multiple facets of investigating the sources of history, developing a comprehensive analysis from such sources, and composing a persuasive interpretation.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 301WI.

HISTORY 497 Special Topics and Readings Credits: 1-6

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

HISTORY 497XCA Special Topics and Readings Credits: 1-6

Special Topics and Readings

HISTORY 498WI Senior Capstone Credits: 3

This is the capstone course in the department and is required for majors in the senior year. It consists of tutorial sessions with a regular faculty member and independent research leading to a major paper using original source materials. Performance in this course will weigh heavily in the award of departmental honors.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 301WI, RooWriter.

HISTORY H497 Special Topics and Readings Credits: 1-6

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.