History (HISTORY)

Courses

HISTORY 101 U.S. History to 1877 Credits: 3

This course offers a broad survey of American history up to 1877.


HISTORY 101 - MOTR HIST 101: American History I
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

HISTORY 102 U.S. History Since 1877 Credits: 3

This course covers American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present.


HISTORY 102 - MOTR HIST 102: American History II
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

HISTORY 201 European History to 1600 Credits: 3

This course surveys the political, social and cultural history of Europe from ancient times to 1600. Beginning with a brief description of the riverine civilizations of the ancient Near East, the course then examines the political and cultural evolution of classical Greco-Roman civilization, the medieval world, the rise of the national state, and the essential characteristics of the eras of the Renaissance and Reformation.


HISTORY 201 - MOTR WCIV 101: Western Civilization I
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

HISTORY 202 European History since 1600 Credits: 3

This course surveys the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe from about 1600 to the present. Emphasis is given to themes of continuity and change in European culture through the experience of political, scientific and industrial revolutions, conservative reactions, liberal reforms, nation building, imperialism, two world wars, fascism, communism and the Cold War.


HISTORY 202 - MOTR WCIV 102: Western Civilization II
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

HISTORY 206 World History To 1450 Credits: 3

This course surveys the cultural, social, economic, and political history of the world to 1450. It studies the development of civilizations in isolation as well as the origins, nature, and consequences of global forms of interaction and exchange.


HISTORY 206 - MOTR HIST 201: World History I
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

HISTORY 208 World History since 1450 Credits: 3

This course surveys the social, economic, political history of the world from 1450 to the present. It studies the development of civilizations in isolation as well as the origins, nature, and consequences of global forms of interaction and exchange.


HISTORY 208 - MOTR HIST 202: World History II
CORE 42 MOTRANSFER GUARANTEED

HISTORY 215 Getting High: Alcohol & Drugs in American History Credits: 3

This class will investigate historical transformations in how American society has defined and responded to problematic drinking and drug use. The class will analyze what controversies surrounding various forms of intoxication indicate about the nature of American society and culture.

HISTORY 300AM Special Topics in Antiquity and Medieval History Credits: 3

This course addresses special topics in Antiquity and Medieval History. Topics are focused and specialized based on faculty interests and change from semester to semester. Special topics courses are repeatable for credit when the topic changes. See notes in Pathway each semester for the specific topic.

HISTORY 300EM Special Topics in Early and Modern European History Credits: 3

This course addresses special topics in Early and Modern European History. Topics are focused and specialized based on faculty interests and change from semester to semester. Special topics courses are repeatable for credit when the topic changes. See notes in Pathway each semester for the specific topic.

HISTORY 300HW Special Topics in World History Credits: 3

This course addresses special topics in World History. Topics are focused and specialized based on faculty interests and change from semester to semester. Special topics courses are repeatable for credit when the topic changes. See notes in Pathway each semester for the specific topic.

HISTORY 300P Special Studies Credits: 1-3

HISTORY 300PH Special Topics in Public History Credits: 3

This course addresses special topics in Public History. Topics are focused and specialized based on faculty interests and change from semester to semester. Special topics courses are repeatable for credit when the topic changes. See notes in Pathway each semester for the specific topic.

HISTORY 300US Special Topics in United States History Credits: 3

This course addresses special topics in United States History. Topics are focused and specialized based on faculty interests and change from semester to semester. Special topics courses are repeatable for credit when the topic changes. See notes in Pathway each semester for the specific topic.

HISTORY 300WY Decade of Dissent: The 1960s Credits: 3

The social movements and conflicts that developed during the 1960s continue to define American culture. Questions of racial and gender equity, a greater willingness to challenge authority, concerns about the environment, and a new openness about issues of sexuality all developed during the sixties and remain as arenas of debate today. This course will examine the origins, contexts, and major themes of the these social and cultural movements.

HISTORY 301WI Historiography and Method Credits: 3

In this course, students will come to a deeper understanding of the uses and production of knowledge, with the goal of becoming better thinkers, writers, and readers. Rather than survey a particular time period, region, or theme, students will explore the methods and practice of academic history. This class is a prerequisite for HISTORY 498WI and will prepare students to conduct original historical research.

HISTORY 302 Colonial North America, 1492–1763 Credits: 3

This course examines European colonization in North America, from the voyage of Christopher Columbus to the eve of the American Revolution. Students will consider the Atlantic-world context of colonization, the environmental factors that shaped colonial development, and the complex interactions of European, African, and Indian peoples.

HISTORY 303 The American Revolution, 1763-1789 Credits: 3

This course examines the history of the American Revolution, from the explosive political crisis of the 1760s to the struggle over ratification of the Constitution. Students will consider the origins and conduct of the war, as well as the Revolution’s far-reaching political, social, and economic consequences.

HISTORY 304 The Early American Republic, 1789–1850 Credits: 3

This class will survey major themes in the history of the early American republic, from the passage of the Constitution in 1789 to the California Gold Rush of 1849.

HISTORY 306 America, 1850-1877: Civil War and Reconstruction Credits: 3

The 1850s-1870s were pivotal decades in the history of the United States. This course examines the many important political and military developments of the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction, while also exploring the social, economic, and cultural aspects of the period with a special emphasis on the politics of slavery, the process of emancipation, and the experiences of women.

HISTORY 306A History of Christianity to the Middle Ages Credits: 3

This course examines the cultural, historical and theological development of Christianity from its origins to the High Middle Ages. The main themes follow the mechanisms and conditions shaping Christianity's expansion into a major cultural, social, institutional, and intellectual force in Western Europe with a focus on patterns of crisis and reform.

HISTORY 307A History of Christianity from the Middles Ages to Present Credits: 3

This course examines the cultural, historical and theological development of Christianity from the High Middle Ages to the present. The main themes follow the development of foundational Christian theological thought and practice into what are now mainstream Western Christian theologies, the institutional histories of Western Christianity, and the cultures of Western civilization.

HISTORY 309 World War II Film and Propaganda Credits: 3

This course examines film and propaganda, including posters, political cartoons, speeches, and other media, created in prewar or wartime conditions by both the Allies and Axis powers from 1933 to 1945 as it affected World War II.

HISTORY 334 History of Technology Credits: 3

The course examines technology as it shapes and is shaped by human society. Students will consider technology as a product of historically-specific and sometimes overlapping contexts shaped by culture, economics, natural environments, and social processes.

HISTORY 343 Oral History Credits: 3

This course focuses on the methods, theories, ethics, practices, and applications of tools in documenting and recovering the experiences of people hidden from the “traditional records.” Through lectures, readings, discussions, and fieldwork, students will learn the various steps in developing a robust oral history project. Students will go out into the community to capture the histories of communities in Kansas City.

HISTORY 348 Missouri/Kansas Border Wars Credits: 3

This course explores the history of the Civil War on the Missouri/Kansas border, where residents first shed blood over the issue slavery. An exploration of this most uncivil of wars provides insight into the ways in which societies can be fragmented by ideology and ultimately rebuilt upon different lines.

HISTORY 349 Civil War in Memory and Film Credits: 3

This course explores how the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction has been portrayed in film, literature, and art, and if the popular memory of the war accurately reflects the history. We also will discuss how the understanding of this pivotal event in American History has changed over time and how cultural artifacts often say more about the time in which they were produced than the actual history of the Civil War.

HISTORY 356 Rise of the City in the U.S. Credits: 3

This course examines the evolution of U.S. cities from the Pre-Colonial era to contemporary times. Students will grasp the major themes and topics in American Urban History including: city planning beginnings, industrialization, (im)migration to the city, Progressivism and urban politics, urban decline and renewal, social movements, and suburbanization. This course will have a special emphasis on issues of race, class, and gender, and how these affected the growth of American cities.

HISTORY 357 The American West Credits: 3

This course deals with the relationship of the American West to the social and economic development of the United States. Major emphasis is placed on the role of the trans-Mississippi West in the economic growth of the national economy. Related cultural and political events are evaluated in the terms of the many Western frontiers. Emphasis will be placed on the Turner thesis, the Indian heritage, frontier violence, and the cow town experience.

HISTORY 358 History of the Early American South Credits: 3

Exploring the history of the early American South serves as a window into crucial issues in American history, such as the history of slavery and race relations and the coming of the Civil War. This course examines the lived experiences of the South’s diverse inhabitants, with a special focus on women and enslaved and indigenous peoples, from the establishment of Jamestown through the Civil War. How white Southerners defended their society and slavery through their promotion of a separate southern nation also will be discussed.

HISTORY 365A American Environmental History Credits: 3

This course examines the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. The main argument of this course will be that American history looks very different through an environmental lens. Nature is an important category of historical analysis—as well as a topic worthy of historical study itself—and this course will examine themes as diverse as Native American ecology and the modern environmental crusade.

HISTORY 366RR American Labor History Credits: 3

This course examines the history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1750 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement, the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers' relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

HISTORY 369 Women in Early America Credits: 3

This course examines the ways in which gender, race, region, and class have shaped the historical experiences of American women. Students will trace women’s lives from pre-European contact to 1877 through an examination of a wide variety of social, cultural, economic, and political forces and factors.

HISTORY 371 American History Through Film Credits: 3

This course will move through the twentieth century and highlight major themes and developments that reveal the contours of American history as depicted in film. Students will examine the ways in which filmmakers have presented history, paying particular attention to the presentation of political, cultural, and social conflicts.

HISTORY 375 Success and Failure in Nineteenth Century America Credits: 3

This course traces the social history and cultural significance of success, failure, and poverty in nineteenth-century America. The class will investigate how diverse Americans made sense of the rapidly growing disparities of wealth that accompanied the rise of industrial capitalism.

HISTORY 379 Museums, Monuments, and American Life: An Introduction to Public History Credits: 3

This course will investigate the ways America commemorates, invokes, and misremembers its history—what scholars call public history. Students will learn the skills professionals use to communicate historical scholarship to wider audiences, and will grapple with the political and ethical issues that arise when we expand the discipline’s stakeholders.

HISTORY 391 Archival Methods Credits: 3

This combined discussion and research course will examine the research potential of primary-source materials in the custody of archival depositories and the methodology employed to effectively utilize these resources. An analysis of archival method, specifically in the areas of arrangement, description and preservation, will be emphasized during the discussion portion of the course. Much of the course will be devoted to independent research in various collections of archives in the area.

HISTORY 392A Archival Internship Credits: 1-3

Students work directly with professional archivists and other personnel at an organization of their choice in the area. Emphasis will be given to areas of arrangement, description and preservation of archival materials. Each student must make individual arrangements through the department.

Prerequisites: Departmental consent.

HISTORY 392B Public History Internship Credits: 1-3

Students work directly with public history and editorial personnel at an organization of their choice in the area. Depending on the institutional affiliation, emphasis will be given to museum operations and displays, editing, fundraising, and historical research and writing. Each student must make individual arrangements through the department.

Prerequisites: Departmental consent.

HISTORY 398 Black Civil Rights in the 20th and 21st Centuries Credits: 3

This course examines the fight for Black civil rights in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries, focusing on the Jim Crow period, the fight to end segregation, and the enduring problem of race in the United States.

HISTORY 400 Special Studies Credits: 1-3

Courses on subjects which are not a part of the regular department offering. The courses result from one or more of the following: (1) The expressed desire of students; (2) the broadened or refocused scholarship of a member of the history faculty; (3) the temporary presence of a scholar whose specialization is not reflected in the department's regular offerings; (4) the conclusion by the department that the course meets a community need; (5) the effort of the history faculty to provide an interdisciplinary approach to an era or topic. The course is experimental in the sense that it is a one-time offering with the potential of repetition or modification--depending upon student, faculty and community response.

HISTORY 400WI Special Studies Credits: 1-3

Special studies in History. Writing Intensive.

HISTORY 404 Women, Gender and Sexuality in Latin America Credits: 3

This course studies women, gender and sexuality in Latin America from the eve of conquest by the Portuguese and the Spanish in the fifteenth century to the present. It focuses on the exercise of power within and outside households and its impact on private and public spaces (both lay and religious). By introducing students to the analytical concepts of race, gender, masculinities and queer theory, this course discusses the creation and perpetuation of a hierarchical social order that affected European, Indigenous and Afro-Latin American men and women.

HISTORY 405 Colonial Latin America (From the Encounter to the Early 19th Century) Credits: 3

This course discusses the conquest and colonization of Latin America by the Spanish and the Portuguese imperial powers from the time of the encounter to the early nineteenth century. It studies the Iberian, Indigenous and African cultures and their influence in the creation of a hierarchical imperial order. Emphasis is given to the impact of the conquest, the economics of exploitation, race, sexual and gender identities, and religious and legal domination.

HISTORY 406 Modern Latin America Credits: 3

This course studies social, political, economic and cultural trends in Latin America from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Discussion topics include nation building after independence with an emphasis on gender and race in the creation of national identities and new forms of social stratification; integration of national economies into the world economic system; the expansion of political participation and citizenship; and immigration and the tensions caused by the forces of modernization and tradition.

HISTORY 407 Latin American Crises and Opportunities Credits: 3

This course studies why Latin America has experienced in the 20th and 21st centuries recurrent economic and political crises – and why it is still a land of enormous opportunity. While this is primarily a history course, it undertakes a multidisciplinary examination of the region’s strengths and weaknesses by discussing theories of economic development, political and sociological models as well as the influence of crime and violence. Case studies anchored in representative countries will be used to illustrate historical trends. We will study key export commodities (from silver to cocaine), formal and informal labor markets (including child labor), and women’s participation in economic development.

HISTORY 411A Medieval Civilization I Credits: 3

This course covers the period between the decline of the Roman Empire in the West and the Investiture Controversy. Topics include the rise of Christianity and early church-state relationships; the barbarian invasions and the various Germanic kingdoms; the age of Charlemagne; monasticism and feudalism. There will also be special sessions on the civilizations of Islam and Byzantium.

HISTORY 411B Medieval Civilization II Credits: 3

This course engages the study of medieval European civilization from the Carolingian Age (ca. 750 CE) to the Age of Exploration (ca. 1500). Topics include the connections between social, economic, political, and intellectual cultures of the Middle Ages; wars of religion and conquest; the Black Death; the development of systems of law and justice; and constructions of society and social groups, including gender and sexuality.

HISTORY 412A Women and Gender in the Middle Ages Credits: 3

This course explores the history of women, and the social, political, and intellectual constructions of gender in medieval European culture, from about 500 CE to about 1500 CE, through both primary and secondary sources. Topics include changes to the social, political, economic, and legal status of women during the medieval millennium; the roles of women in medieval religious cultures (including Judaism and Islam); the position of women in the family and kinship structures of medieval Europe; and the ways in which gender was constructed and modeled, including definitions and the performance of masculinity.

HISTORY 414 Reformation Credits: 3

Beginning with a description and analysis of the social, intellectual and political aspects of the later Middle Ages, the course continues with an examination of those profound religious, social and political changes which mark the 16th century as the end of the Middle Ages and the beginning of the modern secular era.

HISTORY 416R The French Revolution and Napoleon Credits: 3

This course covers European history during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Era. It will open with a survey of Europe during the late 18th century focusing on France during the last phase of the old regime. The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars will make up the bulk of the semester’s material. These events affected all of Europe and the course will be taught in that manner. The last segment of the course will cover the legacy of the Revolution and Napoleon and conclude with the revolutions of 1848.

HISTORY 420CC World War I in Film: The World made Modern Credits: 3

This cluster course examines World War I and its legacy through the lenses of international history and film studies. It explores the origins and conduct of the "Great War," as it was called at the time, as well as its transforming effects on the modern international relations and the ongoing process of globalization. It also examines how the war spurred the growth of an infant motion picture industry, and how movies produced during the decades that followed helped shaping popular memories of the conflict-reflecting and shaping cultural discourses regarding the myth or reality of modern civilizational progress; the ethics of modern weaponry; the individual's placed in mass society; constructions of class, race, and gender; and the meaning of national identify in a globalizing world. The class will draw on selected history texts and an array of films and film clips.

HISTORY 430RA World War One through its Artifacts Credits: 3

This course focuses on the global causes, character, and consequences of the First World War from 1914 to 1918. Students will also learn how to apply interdisciplinary theories of material culture to artifacts located at institutions of public memory such as the National World War One Memorial Museum at Liberty Memorial.

HISTORY 431R History of the British Isles, ca. 500 to 1500 Credits: 3

This course explores the history of the British Isles from the transition from the Roman period and the settlement of the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes in what became England, to about 1500. Although emphasis will be on England, the course will also cover the medieval cultures of Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, especially as these regions interacted with England. Emphasis on the assessment of primary sources in translation will enable students to explore the social, political, legal, and intellectual cultures of the medieval British Isles.

HISTORY 432R Tudor England, 1485-1603 Credits: 3

This course covers England from the accession of Henry VII, the first Tudor, to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603. Topics to be covered are: transformation of England into a modern state, the Reformation, the role of Parliament, and conflicts with European powers, especially Spain.

HISTORY 433R History of Britain 1603-1832 Credits: 3

This course surveys the history of Britain from the the rise of the Stuart dynasty through the Industrial Revolution, with particular emphasis on the cultural aspects of political, social, economic, and military changes. Topics include: the domination of the aristocracy; the rise of the Navy; the exploration of the Pacific; the monarchy of George III; the loss of the American colonies; the wars with Napoleon; the Agricultural and early Industrial Revolutions; and the social changes they brought in both Britain and the Empire.

HISTORY 436R Modern German History Credits: 3

This course traces the history of Central Europe from the fall of Bismarck to the reunification of Germany one century later. It will ask students to think critically about the relationship between state and society, elites and 'ordinary' Germans, in the various German-speaking regimes that existed over the course of this era: two empires, two interwar republics, two fascist dictatorships, and three post-fascist republics. All assigned readings will be in English; a background knowledge of European history is recommended.

HISTORY 464 Paleography Credits: 3

This course focuses on introducing students to historical forms of European handwriting from the end of the Roman period up to the twentieth century. Students will learn to read various texts written in Latin and the vernaculars, with an emphasis on exploring primary sources and their social, legal, and intellectual contexts. Some preparation in first-year Latin is recommended.

HISTORY 469 Archeology and Biblical History Credits: 3

An examination of ancient Israel as she emerges from the ruins of the past, both lapidary and literary. Through a study of the "mute documents," artifacts man-made (storied cities, household utensils, inscribed shards from Jericho to Jerusalem) we gain an insight indispensable for Biblical studies, for ancient Near Eastern history.

HISTORY 470 Ancient Egypt Credits: 3

This course describes the political, social and cultural evolution of ancient Egypt from pre-dynastic times, with major emphasis upon the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms (especially the 18th dynasty and the reign of Akhenaton).

HISTORY 471 Ancient Greece Credits: 3

This course begins with a survey of the pre-classical Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations and then describes the rise of prominent Greek city-states (with particular emphasis upon the evolution of Sparta and the political, social and cultural contributions of Athens). The course concludes with the rise of Macedon and Alexander's conquests and significance.

HISTORY 472 Ancient Rome Credits: 3

This course covers Roman history from its origins (including the Etruscans) to the decline of the imperial system. Particular emphasis is placed upon the political, social and economic developments in the Republic, the death of the Republic, the early Principate, and the factors that led to Rome's decline in the ancient world.

HISTORY 474 Late Antiquity: The Transformation of the Mediterranean World (200–600 AD) Credits: 3

The decline of the Roman Empire and the barbarian invasions transformed the Mediterranean and European worlds, forming the foundation of Europe and the Islamic world. Students will investigate the multicultural society of Late Antiquity and become familiar with the primary sources for the period.

HISTORY 476 Medieval Jewish History Credits: 3

This course covers the general period from the decline of the Roman Empire to the dawn of early modern times. It is concerned with Jewish centers of life and learning in the Diaspora, both East and West. The course considers the Jews under Islamic rule from the time of Mohammed through the Golden Age of Moorish Spain. The focus then shifts to the situation of the Jews in Christian Europe, from the period of Constantine to the expulsions from England, France and Christian Spain. The Jews in the Ottoman Empire are mentioned and the course ends with the episode of Sabbatai Zevi, the false Messiah.

HISTORY 494 Public History and New Media Credits: 3

This course provides students with an understanding of how new media can advance the work of cultural heritage. While contributing to an ongoing digital project, the course will consider how historians utilize digital technology to analyze primary sources as well as how historical and cultural institutions use social media to reach broader audiences.

HISTORY 496 Historical Research Project Credits: 1-3

Working extensively with an individual faculty member actively engaged in his/her research, students practice the multiple facets of investigating the sources of history, developing a comprehensive analysis from such sources, and composing a persuasive interpretation.

Prerequisites: Departmental consent.

HISTORY 497 Special Topics and Readings Credits: 1-6

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

HISTORY 498WI Senior Capstone Credits: 3

This is the capstone course in the department and is required for majors in their senior year. It consists of tutorial sessions with a regular faculty member and independent research leading to a major paper using original source materials.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 301WI.

HISTORY H497 Special Topics and Readings Credits: 1-6

Intensive reading and/or research in an area selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.